Cpap and sleep

Posted by steve1948 @steve1948, Feb 24, 2017

I was in the hospital for pneumonia and while I was getting a nebulizer treatment the therapist asked if I use a Cpap at home, at the time I didn’t have one. Now mind you I was only sleeping for 2 hrs a night during my pneumonia bout (2 weeks) and the therapist asked if I were open to using a BPAP (what they call it in a hospital) it was a large machine and I said of course. Upon using it I still only slept for 2 hours but it was a very restful 2 hours of sleep and was welcomed. I told my Pulmonologist and got set up for a sleep study, and it is all history. I sleep more restful (have much less visits to the bathroom at night) and use it religiously. Medicare covered my testing and machine. After my test my doc told me I stopped breathing x amount of times a minute, and was restless (tossed and turned) an ungodly amount of time during my test. On the follow up test (with the Cpap) the number decreased significantly. My sister snores like a constant thunder storm and she went for a test and got her Cpap, and now she doesn’t snore at all and tells me she sleeps much better.
There are two ways to use the machine, with a nostril mask (so to speak) and a full mask (you usually see on TV movies). The latter is what I use, I couldn’t get use to the nostril application, and if you were to catch a cold, I don’t know how well it would work, but I use the mask never the less. Hope this helps, and do read the instructions about your machine.

@jakedduck1

I have a question re the Inspire device. I know virtually nothing about it but understand the patient must meet certain criteria like body mass and weight etc. Anyone know what other criteria must be met and is it set in stone? I’m not sure my cousin would qualify since he’s mentally handicapped and may have difficulty explaining if the device is functioning ideally. Would there be away to be monitored in the hospital after implant? I heard it takes about a month to get used to, is that true? Any other information anyone may have about it I’d be very appreciative to hear from you.
Thanks much,
Jake

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Hi Jake @jakedduck1 — I think there is a pretty good description of the device and who qualifies here:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/medical-professionals/pulmonary-medicine/news/the-emerging-option-of-upper-airway-stimulation-therapy/mac-20431242

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@johnbishop
I appreciate the information you provided very much. It answered a lot of questions I had. I’d like to hear, if possible, from actual users. Unfortunately some manufacturers are not always forthright with their research.
Thanks again,
Jake

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Has anyone have problems with memory loss due to sleep apnea machine?

Liked by Leonard

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@carmella6

Has anyone have problems with memory loss due to sleep apnea machine?

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Hi, @carmella6 – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your discussion and combined it with this discussion, "CPAP and Sleep." I did this so you could meet other members who have discussed sleep apnea machines, Please meet @steve1948 @johnbishop @gerryserafino @thankful @cece55 @alanbruce @bernese53 and others.

Have you noted memory loss since starting to use a machine for sleep apnea, carmella6? If so, will you share more about what you've noticed?

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@carmella6

Has anyone have problems with memory loss due to sleep apnea machine?

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@carmella6 I have not had memory problems from my CPAP machine. I did have memory problems from a medicine I was taking. That ended when I stopped taking the medication.

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Hi, @carmella6 – I would like to add my welcome to Connect along with @lisalucier and other members. I have not experienced memory loss from using a CPAP machine but I have learned that severe sleep apnea can cause memory loss.

If You Have Sleep Apnea, Your Memory May Decline Earlier in Life
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/if-you-have-sleep-apnea-your-memory-may-decline-earlier-in-life/

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Is there a scale that measures the severity of Sleep Apnea?
Jake

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@jakedduck1

Is there a scale that measures the severity of Sleep Apnea?
Jake

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Hi Jake @jakedduck1 — There is a scale of sorts. Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) measures sleep apnea severity. The AHI is the sum of the number of apneas (pauses in breathing) plus the number of hypopneas (periods of shallow breathing) that occur, on average, each hour. … Fifteen to 30 is moderate, while a greater than 30 AHI is considered severe. When I did my overnight sleep study at Mayo Clinic mine was at 52 which the doctor told me was severe obstructive sleep apnea. Now with a CPAP machine mine is running between 3 and 5 most days.

More info here: https://www.sleephealth.org/ufaqs/what-is-ahi-represent/

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Thank you John for the information. It’s very much appreciated.
Jake

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@lisalucier

Hi, @carmella6 – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your discussion and combined it with this discussion, "CPAP and Sleep." I did this so you could meet other members who have discussed sleep apnea machines, Please meet @steve1948 @johnbishop @gerryserafino @thankful @cece55 @alanbruce @bernese53 and others.

Have you noted memory loss since starting to use a machine for sleep apnea, carmella6? If so, will you share more about what you've noticed?

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Thank you Lisa! I have been tested for memory loss and they can't find anything. I have lost my short term and long term memory. I have been tested for EVERYTHING. Memory loss started a few years ago, but has gotten worst. I am also loosing my hair on top.:(

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@johnbishop

Hi, @carmella6 – I would like to add my welcome to Connect along with @lisalucier and other members. I have not experienced memory loss from using a CPAP machine but I have learned that severe sleep apnea can cause memory loss.

If You Have Sleep Apnea, Your Memory May Decline Earlier in Life
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/if-you-have-sleep-apnea-your-memory-may-decline-earlier-in-life/

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Thank you I will look at that website.

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Don't send anymore e-mails!!!!!!!

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@granny55, To stop all notification emails from this discussion, click Unsubscribe at the bottom of this email notification when you receive it.

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@johnbishop

Hi Jake @jakedduck1 — There is a scale of sorts. Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) measures sleep apnea severity. The AHI is the sum of the number of apneas (pauses in breathing) plus the number of hypopneas (periods of shallow breathing) that occur, on average, each hour. … Fifteen to 30 is moderate, while a greater than 30 AHI is considered severe. When I did my overnight sleep study at Mayo Clinic mine was at 52 which the doctor told me was severe obstructive sleep apnea. Now with a CPAP machine mine is running between 3 and 5 most days.

More info here: https://www.sleephealth.org/ufaqs/what-is-ahi-represent/

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Hi, @johnbishop – great that you've reduced your AHI with the CPAP machine. How's it gone getting used to the machine and the mask?

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@lisalucier

Hi, @johnbishop – great that you've reduced your AHI with the CPAP machine. How's it gone getting used to the machine and the mask?

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Hi Lisa @lisalucier — Thanks for posting…I was actually thinking about posting an update as I am used to the CPAP and the AHI has gotten fairly consistent with a few bumps in the road. I have been CPAP mask shopping again but haven't decided. The one I have is the ResMed AirFit F20 full face mask and I use a cloth comfort cover (https://cpapcomfortcover.com/fits-airfit-and-airtouch-f20-full-face-mask/) which really helps. Even with the comfort cover I have nights where I feel claustrophobic and still get a sore spot on the top of my nose.

I can generally tell when I go to bed at night whether it's going to be a good night or a so-so night. Mainly it's from how I can breath through my nose with my mouth closed. If it's not really clear and my right nostril seems plugged it's not looking good. When it's like this it doesn't matter what I do – blow my nose, try to irrigate it, etc, nothing works to make it open up. I found out when I was first diagnosed that I have a deviated septum and I had asked the doctor about it but he didn't think it would make any difference as to the obstructive sleep apnea. Right now I'm thinking maybe it will but don't know if it's worth getting it fixed. I was going to discuss with my doctor but need to set up another appointment with him.

Anyone out there with a deviated septum that has had it fixed? Did it make a difference using your CPAP?

AHI

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