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steve1948
@steve1948

Posts: 28
Joined: Feb 20, 2017

Cpap and sleep

Posted by @steve1948, Feb 24, 2017

I was in the hospital for pneumonia and while I was getting a nebulizer treatment the therapist asked if I use a Cpap at home, at the time I didn’t have one. Now mind you I was only sleeping for 2 hrs a night during my pneumonia bout (2 weeks) and the therapist asked if I were open to using a BPAP (what they call it in a hospital) it was a large machine and I said of course. Upon using it I still only slept for 2 hours but it was a very restful 2 hours of sleep and was welcomed. I told my Pulmonologist and got set up for a sleep study, and it is all history. I sleep more restful (have much less visits to the bathroom at night) and use it religiously. Medicare covered my testing and machine. After my test my doc told me I stopped breathing x amount of times a minute, and was restless (tossed and turned) an ungodly amount of time during my test. On the follow up test (with the Cpap) the number decreased significantly. My sister snores like a constant thunder storm and she went for a test and got her Cpap, and now she doesn’t snore at all and tells me she sleeps much better.
There are two ways to use the machine, with a nostril mask (so to speak) and a full mask (you usually see on TV movies). The latter is what I use, I couldn’t get use to the nostril application, and if you were to catch a cold, I don’t know how well it would work, but I use the mask never the less. Hope this helps, and do read the instructions about your machine.

REPLY

I am glad you were able to find about and get the cure for sleep apnea. Sleep apnea can be a very dangerous condition if left untreated so it is good you got your sister treated as well. It can be genetic in that you inherit a palate (upper part of mouth) that is soft and can collapse. My father had sleep apnea. CPAP and BPAP are two different machines. CPAP is continuous in that it monitors the pressure you need and increases the pressure if needed. BPAP is also know as Bi-PAP and provides in and out pressure at a set level. Thank you for providing your experience and alerting others to this condition.

Hi, @steve1948 — wondering how it's going with your sleep and the CPAP?

@johnhans— sounds like you have a CPAP as well? Is yours working well for you?

@lisalucier

Hi, @steve1948 — wondering how it's going with your sleep and the CPAP?

@johnhans— sounds like you have a CPAP as well? Is yours working well for you?

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My CPAP machine is working well. I have been told by my lung doctor that I only need come back every 2 years for a checkup since it is doing so well for me. Thank you for asking Lisa.

@lisalucier

Hi, @steve1948 — wondering how it's going with your sleep and the CPAP?

@johnhans— sounds like you have a CPAP as well? Is yours working well for you?

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That's really good news, @johnhans. Glad the CPAP is working well.

In your case, did your doctor find your sleep apnea to be genetic, then, due to a soft/collapsible palate?

My father-in-law was diagnosed with sleep apnea about 7-8 years ago, and I know the CPAP made a huge difference for him in sleep quality, and I think for my mother-in-law's peace of mind, too. One of his sons, my brother-in-law, was also found to have sleep apnea this past year and now also uses a CPAP.

Wondering if you could share anything your doctor may have shared with you about the genetic component of this condition?

@lisalucier

Hi, @steve1948 — wondering how it's going with your sleep and the CPAP?

@johnhans— sounds like you have a CPAP as well? Is yours working well for you?

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My doctor just noted that there is sometimes a genetic factor. Research has shown the link. Please see this government study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2699830/ to see all the genetic factors involved. It is good to note that there is a large minority who are not overweight and still have sleep apnea. As the study notes, the throat and face help determine the if sleep apnea is going to occur.

I would have never guessed I had sleep apnea. A month or so ago I had a test ordered for a home sleep apnea study with an oximeter by a Mayo doctor treating me for lymphedema and swelling in my right leg. He did a great job of asking me some key questions and then ordered a few extra tests to help with health issues not directly tied to my lymphedema. The home study identified that I had obstructive sleep apnea and after meeting with the Sleep Medicine doctor to go over the results, he ordered the overnight study that gathers a lot more detailed information than the home study with the oximeter.

Sunday evening I went into the Clinic for my overnight sleep study and it was eye opening for me. Mayo Clinic Sleep Medicine is really good at making you feel comfortable and how the test is done. They even have you watch a 10 minute video of an actual overnight test that used an actor just so you would get the feel of what happens during the test. I thought the video was helpful and took away a little of the apprehension I was having. Monday morning after the test I had a followup with the Sleep Medicine doctor again to go over the results. I did find out on a scale of 5 to 55 for apnea with 55 being severe obstructive sleep apnea, my number was at 52. The doctor wrote a prescription for the CPAP machine and I picked it up at the Mayo Store and used it last night. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be but it is different. I did feel a little better today but I'm hoping it will help me get back some energy.

A special thank you to Jim @thankful for the full mask recommendation. They gave me the full mask that I used during the second part of the overnight study and the doctor said they will give me another one with the CPAP machine and it doesn't have to be the same so I picked out a F&P Simplus because it had a smooth turning tube in the mask that moved very easy. I thought it would be better than the one I used at the Clinic and I was right – very easy and a good fit. No leaks around the mask last night.

John

@johnbishop

I would have never guessed I had sleep apnea. A month or so ago I had a test ordered for a home sleep apnea study with an oximeter by a Mayo doctor treating me for lymphedema and swelling in my right leg. He did a great job of asking me some key questions and then ordered a few extra tests to help with health issues not directly tied to my lymphedema. The home study identified that I had obstructive sleep apnea and after meeting with the Sleep Medicine doctor to go over the results, he ordered the overnight study that gathers a lot more detailed information than the home study with the oximeter.

Sunday evening I went into the Clinic for my overnight sleep study and it was eye opening for me. Mayo Clinic Sleep Medicine is really good at making you feel comfortable and how the test is done. They even have you watch a 10 minute video of an actual overnight test that used an actor just so you would get the feel of what happens during the test. I thought the video was helpful and took away a little of the apprehension I was having. Monday morning after the test I had a followup with the Sleep Medicine doctor again to go over the results. I did find out on a scale of 5 to 55 for apnea with 55 being severe obstructive sleep apnea, my number was at 52. The doctor wrote a prescription for the CPAP machine and I picked it up at the Mayo Store and used it last night. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be but it is different. I did feel a little better today but I'm hoping it will help me get back some energy.

A special thank you to Jim @thankful for the full mask recommendation. They gave me the full mask that I used during the second part of the overnight study and the doctor said they will give me another one with the CPAP machine and it doesn't have to be the same so I picked out a F&P Simplus because it had a smooth turning tube in the mask that moved very easy. I thought it would be better than the one I used at the Clinic and I was right – very easy and a good fit. No leaks around the mask last night.

John

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I saw a neurologist at Mayo for follow-up after an episode of Transient Global Amnesia. She ordered the overnight oximetry test which showed evidence of apnea. The Mayo sleep doctor ordered a sleep study test but my insurance would not cover a stay in the lab. I went over to Gonda at night and was wired by a tech then I went back to my hotel wearing my sleep study gear! Good thing this was in Rochester, MN! I have been using a CPAP for about a year. I have found Mayo Clinic Connect to be invaluable in terms of help with some of the problems from using a CPAP…things like what to do about dry mouth, etc. Good Luck and welcome to the club,

@johnbishop

I would have never guessed I had sleep apnea. A month or so ago I had a test ordered for a home sleep apnea study with an oximeter by a Mayo doctor treating me for lymphedema and swelling in my right leg. He did a great job of asking me some key questions and then ordered a few extra tests to help with health issues not directly tied to my lymphedema. The home study identified that I had obstructive sleep apnea and after meeting with the Sleep Medicine doctor to go over the results, he ordered the overnight study that gathers a lot more detailed information than the home study with the oximeter.

Sunday evening I went into the Clinic for my overnight sleep study and it was eye opening for me. Mayo Clinic Sleep Medicine is really good at making you feel comfortable and how the test is done. They even have you watch a 10 minute video of an actual overnight test that used an actor just so you would get the feel of what happens during the test. I thought the video was helpful and took away a little of the apprehension I was having. Monday morning after the test I had a followup with the Sleep Medicine doctor again to go over the results. I did find out on a scale of 5 to 55 for apnea with 55 being severe obstructive sleep apnea, my number was at 52. The doctor wrote a prescription for the CPAP machine and I picked it up at the Mayo Store and used it last night. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be but it is different. I did feel a little better today but I'm hoping it will help me get back some energy.

A special thank you to Jim @thankful for the full mask recommendation. They gave me the full mask that I used during the second part of the overnight study and the doctor said they will give me another one with the CPAP machine and it doesn't have to be the same so I picked out a F&P Simplus because it had a smooth turning tube in the mask that moved very easy. I thought it would be better than the one I used at the Clinic and I was right – very easy and a good fit. No leaks around the mask last night.

John

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@johnbishop– John, so glad the in hospital sleep study went well and you were able to find a good mask! In my opinion, the mask is the most important part especially early on. If you can sleep comfortably with the mask, then the rest will go well. It took me about 2 weeks to fully get used to it and now I'm almost unaware I even have it on. Even if I decide to take a short mid afternoon siesta, I will use the C pap and always wake up refreshed! And now the REMS begin….

Hey JB,

I'm not sure if you were looking for feedback or were just posting your situation.

The scale referred to is the AHI scale and measures like this:
Normal sleep: Fewer than 5 events per hour
Mild sleep apnea: 5 to 14 events per hour
Moderate sleep apnea: 15 to 29 events per hour
Severe sleep apnea: 30 or more events per hour

So your 52 is a big deal. Fifty two times an hour your breathing/oxygen saturation is disrupted, blasting adrenaline thru your system and putting your heart health at risk.

My diagnosis put me at a 60 and with a breathing pattern referred to as Cheyne-Stokes which complicates the issue. Between the two I developed an arrhythmia called PVCs that, based on my last two 72 hour monitors, average 32,000 a day… a deadly combination.

I share this because after less than 60 nights on my ASV machine (by Res-Med w/water chamber), my AHI average for the last 10 days has been 6. And equally important is that my daily PVC load has come down dramatically. I'll be on a monitor again in about 3 weeks and am confident it will show me closer to 5,000/day.

So, my message to you, John, is to take this seriously – know your mask will take a while for you to get used to using thru the night and your mask will periodically leak, but hang in there – use your machine diligently and you'll see improvements in your rest, energy and general health!

Best, John

@menotpvcs

Hey JB,

I'm not sure if you were looking for feedback or were just posting your situation.

The scale referred to is the AHI scale and measures like this:
Normal sleep: Fewer than 5 events per hour
Mild sleep apnea: 5 to 14 events per hour
Moderate sleep apnea: 15 to 29 events per hour
Severe sleep apnea: 30 or more events per hour

So your 52 is a big deal. Fifty two times an hour your breathing/oxygen saturation is disrupted, blasting adrenaline thru your system and putting your heart health at risk.

My diagnosis put me at a 60 and with a breathing pattern referred to as Cheyne-Stokes which complicates the issue. Between the two I developed an arrhythmia called PVCs that, based on my last two 72 hour monitors, average 32,000 a day… a deadly combination.

I share this because after less than 60 nights on my ASV machine (by Res-Med w/water chamber), my AHI average for the last 10 days has been 6. And equally important is that my daily PVC load has come down dramatically. I'll be on a monitor again in about 3 weeks and am confident it will show me closer to 5,000/day.

So, my message to you, John, is to take this seriously – know your mask will take a while for you to get used to using thru the night and your mask will periodically leak, but hang in there – use your machine diligently and you'll see improvements in your rest, energy and general health!

Best, John

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@menotpvcs, Thank you John! I knew it wasn't good. Funny story – I was showing one of the doctors at a local clinic my Kardia ECG readout on my phone and he thought it showed some PVCs but he took my phone with him and showed it to a couple of other docs and they thought it was minor. I take the ECG everyday for history and it normally shows a "normal" ECG but once in awhile it will tell me it's unclassified or possible AFIB. I had told the doctor about this too and he compared with a recent ECG I had and didn't think it was abnormal. I have an app on my phone that downloads the data via bluetooth from my CPAP machine. It showed my AHI as 17.4 for the 8 hours of sleep last night using the CPAP. The doctor is looking to get the number down around 4 for the AHI. I have an appointment in about 8 weeks where I have to take the machine back and they download the data.

John
P.S. – I really do take it seriously even though I make some jokes about it sometimes.

@menotpvcs

Hey JB,

I'm not sure if you were looking for feedback or were just posting your situation.

The scale referred to is the AHI scale and measures like this:
Normal sleep: Fewer than 5 events per hour
Mild sleep apnea: 5 to 14 events per hour
Moderate sleep apnea: 15 to 29 events per hour
Severe sleep apnea: 30 or more events per hour

So your 52 is a big deal. Fifty two times an hour your breathing/oxygen saturation is disrupted, blasting adrenaline thru your system and putting your heart health at risk.

My diagnosis put me at a 60 and with a breathing pattern referred to as Cheyne-Stokes which complicates the issue. Between the two I developed an arrhythmia called PVCs that, based on my last two 72 hour monitors, average 32,000 a day… a deadly combination.

I share this because after less than 60 nights on my ASV machine (by Res-Med w/water chamber), my AHI average for the last 10 days has been 6. And equally important is that my daily PVC load has come down dramatically. I'll be on a monitor again in about 3 weeks and am confident it will show me closer to 5,000/day.

So, my message to you, John, is to take this seriously – know your mask will take a while for you to get used to using thru the night and your mask will periodically leak, but hang in there – use your machine diligently and you'll see improvements in your rest, energy and general health!

Best, John

Jump to this post

@johnbishop– I would think that the new C-paps are set up so the Drs. can view your numbers, etc. remotely. At least my newer machine I've had for 2yrs. is that way? The 2 previous machines I had, had a card reader that I brought in for them to read. Unless they need to make some in office adjustments (also which I believe then can do remotely) that would be the only reason? It used to be that often clients would lie about the frequency of them using the machine at all and the only way was for them to have the machine and view the internal program that would give them that info. Since essentially you are renting the machine until the payments pay for the machine and the proof that you are in fact using it needs to be verified by ther dr. to your insurance carrier or medicare.

@johnbishop and @thankful

This is all really interesting, but I'm feeling ignorant. Can you tell me what AHI means? Teresa

@menotpvcs

Hey JB,

I'm not sure if you were looking for feedback or were just posting your situation.

The scale referred to is the AHI scale and measures like this:
Normal sleep: Fewer than 5 events per hour
Mild sleep apnea: 5 to 14 events per hour
Moderate sleep apnea: 15 to 29 events per hour
Severe sleep apnea: 30 or more events per hour

So your 52 is a big deal. Fifty two times an hour your breathing/oxygen saturation is disrupted, blasting adrenaline thru your system and putting your heart health at risk.

My diagnosis put me at a 60 and with a breathing pattern referred to as Cheyne-Stokes which complicates the issue. Between the two I developed an arrhythmia called PVCs that, based on my last two 72 hour monitors, average 32,000 a day… a deadly combination.

I share this because after less than 60 nights on my ASV machine (by Res-Med w/water chamber), my AHI average for the last 10 days has been 6. And equally important is that my daily PVC load has come down dramatically. I'll be on a monitor again in about 3 weeks and am confident it will show me closer to 5,000/day.

So, my message to you, John, is to take this seriously – know your mask will take a while for you to get used to using thru the night and your mask will periodically leak, but hang in there – use your machine diligently and you'll see improvements in your rest, energy and general health!

Best, John

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@thankful Yuppers, that's what the doctor told me when he went through the procedure. He gave me a sheet with a list of 5 or 6 CPAP providers in the Rochester area but I told him I was going through Mayo Clinic as it's my in network provider and would be easier insurance wise. That's when he explained how it's paid for and you basically rent it for 13 months and then it's yours but has a 2 year warranty. The one he ordered for me or suggested I get is the Dreamsense as it has an auto function that you can use to lower the starting amount of air being pushed for 15 minutes to let you get to sleep if the pressure is hard to get used to. Mine is set to start at 08 and go as high as 18. I just have to turn it on and push another button to make it drop to 04 for 15 minutes. It does send data to the cloud if you use the app supplied (IOS or Android) by the CPAP company (www.dreammapper.com) but the doctor told me that they don't access it but it is used by researchers to write papers which seemed to bother him. He also told me he has to write a prescription every year after verifying the usage.

John

@hopeful33250

@johnbishop and @thankful

This is all really interesting, but I'm feeling ignorant. Can you tell me what AHI means? Teresa

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Hi Teresa @hopeful33250 — I had to look it up too. @menotpvcs described it well in the post above to me.

http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sleep-apnea/diagnosing-osa/understanding-results

@menotpvcs

Hey JB,

I'm not sure if you were looking for feedback or were just posting your situation.

The scale referred to is the AHI scale and measures like this:
Normal sleep: Fewer than 5 events per hour
Mild sleep apnea: 5 to 14 events per hour
Moderate sleep apnea: 15 to 29 events per hour
Severe sleep apnea: 30 or more events per hour

So your 52 is a big deal. Fifty two times an hour your breathing/oxygen saturation is disrupted, blasting adrenaline thru your system and putting your heart health at risk.

My diagnosis put me at a 60 and with a breathing pattern referred to as Cheyne-Stokes which complicates the issue. Between the two I developed an arrhythmia called PVCs that, based on my last two 72 hour monitors, average 32,000 a day… a deadly combination.

I share this because after less than 60 nights on my ASV machine (by Res-Med w/water chamber), my AHI average for the last 10 days has been 6. And equally important is that my daily PVC load has come down dramatically. I'll be on a monitor again in about 3 weeks and am confident it will show me closer to 5,000/day.

So, my message to you, John, is to take this seriously – know your mask will take a while for you to get used to using thru the night and your mask will periodically leak, but hang in there – use your machine diligently and you'll see improvements in your rest, energy and general health!

Best, John

Jump to this post

My machine is set for 15 to 20. I had something like 55 events when tested many years ago. Now if I cannot use it because the mask broke or I have a bad cold, I have trouble getting to sleep because it seems so strange without it. My father had sleep apnea and ending up dead because of it. He kept getting strokes since the loss of air causes the heart arrythmias which lead to clots. So may I encourage you John in keeping up the therapy. The use will prolong your life.

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