MAC and getting the COVID vaccine

Posted by cmi @cmi, Jan 6 6:34am

This is a wonderful team…like a real cooperativa family…we are a band of patients that strategize together…amazing. All good dialogue for “rits”…I also believe the CAT scan would be a good step…it arms the doctor with evidence.

I have another question for the group…what are the feelings on “us” being candidates for the Covid vaccine? Has anyone yet vaccinated? I see my ID doc this afternoon…it is one of my concerns. Any feedback appreciated.
Regina

@ling123

@imcoff Hi Lynn, are you sure your nausea and vomiting were from the vaccine shot? None of the people I know who have received Moderna vaccine has mentioned your symptoms. Fatigue, yes, chills, yes, the most serious may be low fever for a number of hours. But that is all I have heard.

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@ling123 I have had bad reactions to both doses. I don’t know if it’s because I am on the Big 3 and Arikayce and am the size of a ten year old or what it is … but I am struggling to get over this. I have been very nauseous but have not “ lost my cookies.” For me the side effects of the second Moderna have been brutal. ( chills, fever, aches – and I had it on Monday). I could not get out of bed on Tuesday. I wish there were a smaller dose for small people! The good news is that I guess it means that at age 71 my body is able to react to it and is making antibodies. My Chinese daughter GUI had the very painful armpit lymph gland thing and a very swollen , red, hot, and painful arm. My husband, age 75 had the Pfizer and had no side effects. One of our children was fortunate enough to get the J and J vaccine – one and done and had no side effects. So crazy, but soon I can hug again – and again – and again. @irene5

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@irene5

@ling123 I have had bad reactions to both doses. I don’t know if it’s because I am on the Big 3 and Arikayce and am the size of a ten year old or what it is … but I am struggling to get over this. I have been very nauseous but have not “ lost my cookies.” For me the side effects of the second Moderna have been brutal. ( chills, fever, aches – and I had it on Monday). I could not get out of bed on Tuesday. I wish there were a smaller dose for small people! The good news is that I guess it means that at age 71 my body is able to react to it and is making antibodies. My Chinese daughter GUI had the very painful armpit lymph gland thing and a very swollen , red, hot, and painful arm. My husband, age 75 had the Pfizer and had no side effects. One of our children was fortunate enough to get the J and J vaccine – one and done and had no side effects. So crazy, but soon I can hug again – and again – and again. @irene5

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@irene5 OMG Irene! I had no idea. Hope you'll get through this very soon. This is the first time I have heard of nausea and vomiting as side effects of the vaccine. I felt nothing except achiness at the injection site for my first shot. I'm getting my second shot this afternoon. Wonder how I will feel afterwards. I never had COVID and have not been on big 3. Everybody I know across the country who have had Moderna has either no side effect whatsoever, or very minor ones. Fingers crossed.

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@lmcoff

Hi All,

Newbie here. 🙂

I am wondering if there is something I can do to counteract nausea and vomiting from the Moderna 1st and 2nd shots? I just got my first shot today. Mostly just my arm hurts and I feel a little dizzy but it's not horrible. But nausea and vomiting (which everyone gets from time to time) completely freak me out.

Just trying to be prepared, since I am prone to getting side effects like these. Staying calm. LOL!

Lynn

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I just had my second Moderna shot yesterday. Not nauseous at all. My arm hurts, and I had a bad headache last night. That seems to be it so far

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@irene5

@ling123 I have had bad reactions to both doses. I don’t know if it’s because I am on the Big 3 and Arikayce and am the size of a ten year old or what it is … but I am struggling to get over this. I have been very nauseous but have not “ lost my cookies.” For me the side effects of the second Moderna have been brutal. ( chills, fever, aches – and I had it on Monday). I could not get out of bed on Tuesday. I wish there were a smaller dose for small people! The good news is that I guess it means that at age 71 my body is able to react to it and is making antibodies. My Chinese daughter GUI had the very painful armpit lymph gland thing and a very swollen , red, hot, and painful arm. My husband, age 75 had the Pfizer and had no side effects. One of our children was fortunate enough to get the J and J vaccine – one and done and had no side effects. So crazy, but soon I can hug again – and again – and again. @irene5

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I had my 2nd Pfizer shot on Tuesday at 9 am. At about 5 pm in the afternoon my heart went onto tachycardia. I have medication for it so i took it and went to bed. Next day I had muscle aches, exhaustion, and a low grade fever of 100.5 which lasted for the day. Now it’s Friday and I have been having the afib attacks on and off with my heart rate going as high as 130 beats per minute. Has anyone else had heart symptoms after their vaccine???

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My good friend died from covid in August. Just a few more months and he may have been helped by the vaccine. I have heard of several people reacting in different ways to the different vaccines; headache, nausea, aches, fever, exhaustions, but they always live to tell. How lucky are we to live in such an age that gallant women and men are willing to work around the clock for a year and more to find a vaccine for this very mysterious disease? The tired and beaten up health workers that continue to throw themselves into the ring everyday to care for the sick… people they don't even know. I am amazed and humbled from their enormity of character. I am so sad that I lost my good friend, Martin C. Warner, and for him, I dedicate my vaccine shots I receive starting next week. If I get sick, I will know that they are working and I will feel better in a few days. How lucky for me…. Miss you Marty.

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@bluesplashgirl

My good friend died from covid in August. Just a few more months and he may have been helped by the vaccine. I have heard of several people reacting in different ways to the different vaccines; headache, nausea, aches, fever, exhaustions, but they always live to tell. How lucky are we to live in such an age that gallant women and men are willing to work around the clock for a year and more to find a vaccine for this very mysterious disease? The tired and beaten up health workers that continue to throw themselves into the ring everyday to care for the sick… people they don't even know. I am amazed and humbled from their enormity of character. I am so sad that I lost my good friend, Martin C. Warner, and for him, I dedicate my vaccine shots I receive starting next week. If I get sick, I will know that they are working and I will feel better in a few days. How lucky for me…. Miss you Marty.

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I am so very sorry for your loss, Carolyn. This is a difficult path for most all, but for some, much more. May your friend rest in peace. I will be thinking of you both as I get my second vaccination next Wednesday. With sincere sympathy to you. Toni

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I had both pfizer doses more than a month ago and was beginning to feel more secure and letting up a bit. Just riding the elevator with other people and a friend stopped by. But now I'm anxious and thinking I should isolate again. Here's why.

First I'm not sure I correctly received the second dose. The vaccinator was an er doctor who told me she volunteered because she had been treating covid patients for almost a year and with every shot she gave she felt she was keeping someone out of her er. I thought that was so moving but then she fluffed the shot and had to do it again. There was no peirce just pressure so maybe she forgot to take the cap off? In any case she had to get another syringe. This time I felt the prick but she had trouble finding the spot to put the band aid. Thinking about it, when do er doctors ever give shots?. Still it's not brain surgery so she must have put the vaccine in my arm. Right?

But then I had no reaction at all to the second shot. I had a sore arm after the first one but nothing at all after the second. I envy anyone who had a reaction. Nausea? Chills? Fever? Jealous.

My body did not create the antibodies to pneumonia after vaccination and I was given the shot 3 times. Apparently my body is not good at creating antibodies.

Finally I read yesterday thst there were 89 breakthroughs in Minnesota. A breakthrough is when a vaccinated person comes down with covid. There were breakthroughs in several states and the author pointed out that the vaccine is 95% effective not 100% so some vaccinated people will still come down with the virus. While it's a small number of vaccinated people who have caught it compared to the large number of vaccines given, it's still scary.

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@jr2366

I think I want a little more research on vaccine for Covid

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The mRNA technology used to make Moderna and Pfizer has been being developed for over a decade

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@rits

I had both pfizer doses more than a month ago and was beginning to feel more secure and letting up a bit. Just riding the elevator with other people and a friend stopped by. But now I'm anxious and thinking I should isolate again. Here's why.

First I'm not sure I correctly received the second dose. The vaccinator was an er doctor who told me she volunteered because she had been treating covid patients for almost a year and with every shot she gave she felt she was keeping someone out of her er. I thought that was so moving but then she fluffed the shot and had to do it again. There was no peirce just pressure so maybe she forgot to take the cap off? In any case she had to get another syringe. This time I felt the prick but she had trouble finding the spot to put the band aid. Thinking about it, when do er doctors ever give shots?. Still it's not brain surgery so she must have put the vaccine in my arm. Right?

But then I had no reaction at all to the second shot. I had a sore arm after the first one but nothing at all after the second. I envy anyone who had a reaction. Nausea? Chills? Fever? Jealous.

My body did not create the antibodies to pneumonia after vaccination and I was given the shot 3 times. Apparently my body is not good at creating antibodies.

Finally I read yesterday thst there were 89 breakthroughs in Minnesota. A breakthrough is when a vaccinated person comes down with covid. There were breakthroughs in several states and the author pointed out that the vaccine is 95% effective not 100% so some vaccinated people will still come down with the virus. While it's a small number of vaccinated people who have caught it compared to the large number of vaccines given, it's still scary.

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Rita – Please relax – 89 breakthrough cases in MN out of 869,000 fully vaccinated people = .01 % getting sick – that means so far the vaccine is 99.99% effective at preventing infection. Further, only one has been hospitalized and none have died. Remember that the people vaccinated so far are the most at-risk of serious illness or death (over 65) and the most exposed – health care & education workers.

As for ER docs giving injections – it happens all the time. And I, who am an injection wimp, felt only a pinprick from both of my injections when given (though I did later have an immune reaction & sore arm.) A number of people here had no particular symptoms after the Pfizer vaccine – it seems more reacted to Moderna. If you are concerned about whether you are effectively vaccinated, please check back here later – I have turned to someone to learn how to go about getting an antibody test & what to do if you didn't form antibodies.

I have been following this closely because BOTH of my RN daughters in MN have had to tell vaccinated people that they tested positive and we all got very worried when it happened. But both report that the post-vaccine infections are being monitored very carefully, and serious infection is virtually 100% protected by the vaccine.

Also, at 95% the effectiveness of Covid vaccine is far above the seasonal flu shots (40-70% depending on the year) and even the new Shingrix vaccine (80-90%.)

I am in a community now where all the people I regularly associate with are fully vaccinated, and we still are being careful. And masking fully & distancing when we are out in public. This is as much to protect others if we are silently carrying the virus as because we are worried about getting sick. Also, eating out seems like the riskiest activity we normally would do, so we eat during off-peak hours, and only in places that offer outdoor dining or well-distanced indoor dining & have their staffs properly masked & cleaning things.
Sue

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@rits

I had both pfizer doses more than a month ago and was beginning to feel more secure and letting up a bit. Just riding the elevator with other people and a friend stopped by. But now I'm anxious and thinking I should isolate again. Here's why.

First I'm not sure I correctly received the second dose. The vaccinator was an er doctor who told me she volunteered because she had been treating covid patients for almost a year and with every shot she gave she felt she was keeping someone out of her er. I thought that was so moving but then she fluffed the shot and had to do it again. There was no peirce just pressure so maybe she forgot to take the cap off? In any case she had to get another syringe. This time I felt the prick but she had trouble finding the spot to put the band aid. Thinking about it, when do er doctors ever give shots?. Still it's not brain surgery so she must have put the vaccine in my arm. Right?

But then I had no reaction at all to the second shot. I had a sore arm after the first one but nothing at all after the second. I envy anyone who had a reaction. Nausea? Chills? Fever? Jealous.

My body did not create the antibodies to pneumonia after vaccination and I was given the shot 3 times. Apparently my body is not good at creating antibodies.

Finally I read yesterday thst there were 89 breakthroughs in Minnesota. A breakthrough is when a vaccinated person comes down with covid. There were breakthroughs in several states and the author pointed out that the vaccine is 95% effective not 100% so some vaccinated people will still come down with the virus. While it's a small number of vaccinated people who have caught it compared to the large number of vaccines given, it's still scary.

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@rits My husband had both shots of Pfizer vaccine. The first time he had a slightly sore arm. The second time he had nothing. You are probably good to go! irene5

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@irene5

@rits My husband had both shots of Pfizer vaccine. The first time he had a slightly sore arm. The second time he had nothing. You are probably good to go! irene5

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Or he's bad to go like me. Joking! Thanks.

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@sueinmn

Rita – Please relax – 89 breakthrough cases in MN out of 869,000 fully vaccinated people = .01 % getting sick – that means so far the vaccine is 99.99% effective at preventing infection. Further, only one has been hospitalized and none have died. Remember that the people vaccinated so far are the most at-risk of serious illness or death (over 65) and the most exposed – health care & education workers.

As for ER docs giving injections – it happens all the time. And I, who am an injection wimp, felt only a pinprick from both of my injections when given (though I did later have an immune reaction & sore arm.) A number of people here had no particular symptoms after the Pfizer vaccine – it seems more reacted to Moderna. If you are concerned about whether you are effectively vaccinated, please check back here later – I have turned to someone to learn how to go about getting an antibody test & what to do if you didn't form antibodies.

I have been following this closely because BOTH of my RN daughters in MN have had to tell vaccinated people that they tested positive and we all got very worried when it happened. But both report that the post-vaccine infections are being monitored very carefully, and serious infection is virtually 100% protected by the vaccine.

Also, at 95% the effectiveness of Covid vaccine is far above the seasonal flu shots (40-70% depending on the year) and even the new Shingrix vaccine (80-90%.)

I am in a community now where all the people I regularly associate with are fully vaccinated, and we still are being careful. And masking fully & distancing when we are out in public. This is as much to protect others if we are silently carrying the virus as because we are worried about getting sick. Also, eating out seems like the riskiest activity we normally would do, so we eat during off-peak hours, and only in places that offer outdoor dining or well-distanced indoor dining & have their staffs properly masked & cleaning things.
Sue

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@rits & @irene5 Here is the response I received from my go-to RN on the vaccine – she works in the ER and on the TeleMed & Covid lines for a major health care provider, and consults directly with the Covid specialists there. This is how they respond to vaccine questions:

"Some people don't have strong immune response to 1st or 2nd dose or both. Some people have strong response to 1st and not 2nd. Some people have strong response to 2nd and not first. Some people have strong reaction to both. The level of immune reaction that you can feel/see/measure has no impact on the vaccine's ability to protect you. Your body has received the info and build the antibodies.

Being tested for antibodies is not recommended. The test is expensive, and no medical decisions will be made from having it done no matter what the result is so most insurance companies will not pay for it."

That said, the vaccine manufacturers are also monitoring the early recipients to see when the immune response and/or antibodies begin to fade. That will be the key to determining if or when Covid vaccine boosters will be recommended, and whether they will need to "tweak" their formula to cover virus variants.

Based on all of the above, we need to realize that the world is not a perfect place, there is no perfect vaccine, nor any permanent preventative measure against all illness, disease and risk. I wear my seat belt because it reduces my risk of severe injury or death in a car accident, I clean, store & cook my food properly to reduce the risk of food-borne illness, I exercise to keep my body as strong as possible, I take prescribed meds to reduce the risk of my diseases progressing, I get preventative health screenings to reduce my risk of dying from cancer, and I get vaccines to reduce my risk of severe illness or death from infections. Is my life 100% risk free? No, but I still plan to live well & enjoy it.

Sue

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