What's your review of Cochlear Osia 2 System?

Posted by edemmenegger @edemmenegger, Jun 12 5:24pm

I am getting the implants in a week or so. Would like to hear from people who are using these bone conduction devices.

@jpj

Did you have poor hearing in just the ear that you added cochlear ? How is the hearing in your non cochlear ear?

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Yes. The hearing in my non cochlear is the same. This device balances it out.
Check out OSIA 2 in you tube. It will show you how it is done.😊

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@edemmenegger

Thank you for welcoming me to this community, Colleen. I appreciated the discussion between Lizzy, Tony, Joyces and others. Also got a second chance to look at the FDA benefits and risks. I am 73, have been using bilateral hearing aids (Oticon and Phonak), from about 2005 until now. Increasing chronic infection and discharge in both ears, and resistance to oral antibiotics, has led me to being no longer able to wear hearing aids. I am still using a hearing aid in my left ear, but I need to wipe out the external ear canal every 15-30 minutes to keep it from "flooding out." ;-{> Bone conduction implants are now the best way for me to have hearing assist, and Cochlear's Osia 2 was suggested by my doctor in Madison, WI.

But the information on the internet, including what you pointed me to, pre-dates some of the advances available in this newer Cochlear Osia system. My main question is – who can I talk with who has had this system implanted? Because there is no external abutment, and the external processor is held magnetically to the subcutaneous electronics, I wonder how having it affects sleep, showering, use of an Android phone rather than the directly associated I-phone, wearing head coverings, etc.

I have not seen posts on any blog or forum from 2020 or 2021, which are the first years Osia 2 is being used, and would love to hear from someone currently getting used to them.

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I just had the Osia 2 anchorage system implanted in my right ear on July 13 2021. The short surgery was not painful as I was under anesthesia, and it was just a little uncomfortable for a couple of days. My scalp is still numb on my right side although I am getting more feeling week by week. I received my processor on August 16th, and the change was immediate. Before surgery I was completely deaf on my right side due to sudden hearing loss 2 years ago (with severe vertigo). I tried the Cros, but my ear canal was too tiny to hold it, and it sounded like a tin can, Now I can hear everything through the bone conduction. Although I do have a regular hearing aid for my good ear, I do not use it unless I am going out in public. I no longer need it to watch TV or in one on one conversation because the Osia picks up the slack. I used to view TV with the closed captions because I would miss most of what was said. I can now tell where sound is coming from including when I am driving. I was becoming somewhat reclusive because I simply could not hear anything in a group, and I was also concerned that I could not tell what direction an emergency siren was coming from when I was driving. The Osia has been life changing for me. I do get a mild, occasional feedback, but we are still in the process of adjustment for the processor. I am wearing it for a month and making note of any issues, although I will say there are very few. We can make adjustments when I go back for followup. It has literally opened up my world.
If your ENT considers you a good candidate, you should definitely consider the Osia 2.
In answer to your question about sleeping, you do not sleep with the Osia attached. It is attached to a magnet in your scalp, and you simply remove it to sleep, shower, swim, etc. There is a waterproof cover you can purchase if you wish to use the processor while swimming. For the first three weeks after surgery, I did not sleep on the implant side,, but now I do. I hope this helps. If you have other questions, just post here.
Oh, and one other thing, the audiologist will have an Osia attached to a headband that you can try our to see if it will work for you. Even though the headband made a big difference, it is even better with the magnet on the bone.

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@nat2021

My hearing in my right ear is nearly nothing. My other ear is not as bad but will be.The implant helped in ways that the hearing aids did not. No more whistling, hurting ect. This implant is magnetic and works in the bone conduction of the bad ear. Please read or you tube it (Osia 2.) It is fairly new and only 7 surgeons are qualified to perform this particular surgery. I was just lucky to found him in San Antonio Texas. This device is a dream come true.

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Wow, I just got my Osia 2, and I did not realize that so few surgeons could do this. I guess I was very lucky to have one in Fort Worth.

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@lmayo

Wow, I just got my Osia 2, and I did not realize that so few surgeons could do this. I guess I was very lucky to have one in Fort Worth.

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It is amazing! I am so glad I did it.
I was lucky as well. I saw this doctor in hum bug.
Best decision ever. Hope yours is the same!

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@lmayo

I just had the Osia 2 anchorage system implanted in my right ear on July 13 2021. The short surgery was not painful as I was under anesthesia, and it was just a little uncomfortable for a couple of days. My scalp is still numb on my right side although I am getting more feeling week by week. I received my processor on August 16th, and the change was immediate. Before surgery I was completely deaf on my right side due to sudden hearing loss 2 years ago (with severe vertigo). I tried the Cros, but my ear canal was too tiny to hold it, and it sounded like a tin can, Now I can hear everything through the bone conduction. Although I do have a regular hearing aid for my good ear, I do not use it unless I am going out in public. I no longer need it to watch TV or in one on one conversation because the Osia picks up the slack. I used to view TV with the closed captions because I would miss most of what was said. I can now tell where sound is coming from including when I am driving. I was becoming somewhat reclusive because I simply could not hear anything in a group, and I was also concerned that I could not tell what direction an emergency siren was coming from when I was driving. The Osia has been life changing for me. I do get a mild, occasional feedback, but we are still in the process of adjustment for the processor. I am wearing it for a month and making note of any issues, although I will say there are very few. We can make adjustments when I go back for followup. It has literally opened up my world.
If your ENT considers you a good candidate, you should definitely consider the Osia 2.
In answer to your question about sleeping, you do not sleep with the Osia attached. It is attached to a magnet in your scalp, and you simply remove it to sleep, shower, swim, etc. There is a waterproof cover you can purchase if you wish to use the processor while swimming. For the first three weeks after surgery, I did not sleep on the implant side,, but now I do. I hope this helps. If you have other questions, just post here.
Oh, and one other thing, the audiologist will have an Osia attached to a headband that you can try our to see if it will work for you. Even though the headband made a big difference, it is even better with the magnet on the bone.

Jump to this post

Thanks so much for the excellent feedback. What was the time from start to satisfaction?

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what are the pros & cons on tinnitus? how much risk in making it worse? as I understand it its dicy?

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Hi–
I just happened to do a quick internet search of Osia to see if there were more user testimonials out since there weren't many when I got mine back in January (activated in February) of this year (2021). I LOOOOOOOVE MY OSIA!
I've had issues with my left ear since childhood and I always considered it my bad ear. I had ear surgery to repair my left ear drum when I was 8 years old, which resulted in my ear canal growing smaller than it should be. I've had moderate hearing loss in that ear since childhood (it's hard to hear conversations well). Then, in October 2020, I went deaf in my right ear (SSHL)–the ear I've relied on all these years!
I work at a college and sometimes teach classes, so I needed a remedy quickly. I did my research and knew I wanted a bone-conduction device. I had my Osia 2 implant surgery in January and the device was activated in February. My out-patient surgery lasted three hours. I was pretty sore (probably from having my neck held to the side during surgery) for about 10 days. Once my swelling went down and the soreness dissipated, I started feeling better. Note: It was all completely tolerable and worth it.
I've got to run, but I'll come back and share more information this afternoon.

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Sorry–I meant to say I stumbled upon this conversation thread as I was searching Osia 2 reviews. So I created an account and here I am. 🙂

So I'm still totally deaf on my right side (SSHL), but I have the Osia 2 on my left side now to bring my left ear/side up to a good working level. They considered giving me a second bone-conduction device on my right side, but I didn't have good bone conduction scores so we decided against it. I'm getting on well with just left-side hearing.

@edemmenegger– To answer your questions, I've always slept only on my back and on my right side. Since the implant is on my left side, my sleep isn't affected. As you probably already know, you take off the sound processor when sleeping. But I don't think the implant will make you uncomfortable if it's installed on your sleeping side. Since you can't get the external sound processor part wet, you don't wear it when showering. (They do sell an aqua kit for swimming, which I have and it worked great! That was exciting for me; however, because I like to use a tether to ensure my sound processor doesn't fly across the room when I move my hair, it's kind of a pain to take the aqua cover on and off.) I can feel a lump in my head where the bottom part of the implant (the part that houses the vibrating piece) is. I have an iPhone, so I can't answer the Android question–I'm sorry about that. Wearing head coverings is tricky. I recently had my Ph.D. hooding ceremony (for graduation) and I couldn't wear my grad cap because it would knock the device off. I've seen where some people will cut a little hole in their hats to help with this issue.

As far as hearing goes, it sounds just like my natural hearing. After I lost hearing in my right ear, I used a cheap hearing amplifier to help out my left ear and to help me "stay in the game" while I figured out what my hearing solution would be. Similar to wearing headphones or ear buds, that device would become uncomfortable after a while. I NEVER feel that way with the Osia. It truly seems like I'm hearing as I always have–very natural.

Another important thing to note about this device is that it is extremely comfortable to wear. When I was researching solutions, I read about the challenges wearers dealt with when wearing BAHA devices that snap on. They seemed to have issues with the wound trying to heal itself, draining fluid, or scabbing. Since the Osia is held in place via a magnet, those challenges don't exist for its wearers. Some BAHA devices use magnets, but because they were submitting vibrations through the skin, they had to be really tight/strong magnets. Because Osia's vibrating part is under the scalp and on the skull, the magnet connection doesn't have to be really strong. Wearing my device feels comparable to wearing a barrette. There's absolutely no discomfort; it doesn't bother me at all. I would wear it all day long if batteries, water, and smooshing it into my pillow (this causes microphone feedback) wasn't an issue.

Battery usage is another important topic. I have to replace the battery in my device every other day. Battery usage is affected by the amount of streaming you do to your device. Since I have an iPhone, I can watch videos on my phone and have the sound stream directly to my Osia device, which is REALLY nice. If you're interested in doing so, you can even have your phone calls and alerts routed directly to your device (you would still need to speak into your phone though, since the Osia can't send your audio back to the person on the line). I turned off the feature that allowed phone calls to go to my device because it was really weird to be having a conversation at work and then have a telephone ringing in my head.

If you have access to Tiktok, there are some helpful videos on there for those of you who are approaching surgery or just looking for more information. I found a helpful user (just type Osia implant into the search box in Tiktok and you'll find her) when I was scouring the internet looking for user feedback on the Osia prior to my surgery. Her videos helped me learn how to prepare for and what to expect from surgery and the device.

Please note that the Osia is NOT a cochlear implant. The manufacturer's name is Cochlear and it is an implant, but it is a bone-conduction device and not a cochlear implant. My understanding is that the bone-conduction devices send sound waves to the working inner ear, which allows the brain to interpret the sounds; whereas, cochlear implants bypass the ear altogether and send signals directly to the auditory nerve. Two completely different types of mechanisms.

Please let me know if you have any questions that I can answer. I really want to help people who have the same types of questions and concerns that I had since there's not a lot of user information out there.

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@dwi

Thanks so much for the excellent feedback. What was the time from start to satisfaction?

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I went deaf in my right ear on Oct. 10, 2020, and had my surgery on January 25. My device was activated on February 25. My insurance doesn't pay for hearing exams or hearing aids, but they paid for the device and surgery. (THANK GOODNESS!)

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@awilst

what are the pros & cons on tinnitus? how much risk in making it worse? as I understand it its dicy?

Jump to this post

I, luckily, didn't have issues with tinnitus prior to my implant. That's still the case after my Osia was implanted.

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@sam2678

Sorry–I meant to say I stumbled upon this conversation thread as I was searching Osia 2 reviews. So I created an account and here I am. 🙂

So I'm still totally deaf on my right side (SSHL), but I have the Osia 2 on my left side now to bring my left ear/side up to a good working level. They considered giving me a second bone-conduction device on my right side, but I didn't have good bone conduction scores so we decided against it. I'm getting on well with just left-side hearing.

@edemmenegger– To answer your questions, I've always slept only on my back and on my right side. Since the implant is on my left side, my sleep isn't affected. As you probably already know, you take off the sound processor when sleeping. But I don't think the implant will make you uncomfortable if it's installed on your sleeping side. Since you can't get the external sound processor part wet, you don't wear it when showering. (They do sell an aqua kit for swimming, which I have and it worked great! That was exciting for me; however, because I like to use a tether to ensure my sound processor doesn't fly across the room when I move my hair, it's kind of a pain to take the aqua cover on and off.) I can feel a lump in my head where the bottom part of the implant (the part that houses the vibrating piece) is. I have an iPhone, so I can't answer the Android question–I'm sorry about that. Wearing head coverings is tricky. I recently had my Ph.D. hooding ceremony (for graduation) and I couldn't wear my grad cap because it would knock the device off. I've seen where some people will cut a little hole in their hats to help with this issue.

As far as hearing goes, it sounds just like my natural hearing. After I lost hearing in my right ear, I used a cheap hearing amplifier to help out my left ear and to help me "stay in the game" while I figured out what my hearing solution would be. Similar to wearing headphones or ear buds, that device would become uncomfortable after a while. I NEVER feel that way with the Osia. It truly seems like I'm hearing as I always have–very natural.

Another important thing to note about this device is that it is extremely comfortable to wear. When I was researching solutions, I read about the challenges wearers dealt with when wearing BAHA devices that snap on. They seemed to have issues with the wound trying to heal itself, draining fluid, or scabbing. Since the Osia is held in place via a magnet, those challenges don't exist for its wearers. Some BAHA devices use magnets, but because they were submitting vibrations through the skin, they had to be really tight/strong magnets. Because Osia's vibrating part is under the scalp and on the skull, the magnet connection doesn't have to be really strong. Wearing my device feels comparable to wearing a barrette. There's absolutely no discomfort; it doesn't bother me at all. I would wear it all day long if batteries, water, and smooshing it into my pillow (this causes microphone feedback) wasn't an issue.

Battery usage is another important topic. I have to replace the battery in my device every other day. Battery usage is affected by the amount of streaming you do to your device. Since I have an iPhone, I can watch videos on my phone and have the sound stream directly to my Osia device, which is REALLY nice. If you're interested in doing so, you can even have your phone calls and alerts routed directly to your device (you would still need to speak into your phone though, since the Osia can't send your audio back to the person on the line). I turned off the feature that allowed phone calls to go to my device because it was really weird to be having a conversation at work and then have a telephone ringing in my head.

If you have access to Tiktok, there are some helpful videos on there for those of you who are approaching surgery or just looking for more information. I found a helpful user (just type Osia implant into the search box in Tiktok and you'll find her) when I was scouring the internet looking for user feedback on the Osia prior to my surgery. Her videos helped me learn how to prepare for and what to expect from surgery and the device.

Please note that the Osia is NOT a cochlear implant. The manufacturer's name is Cochlear and it is an implant, but it is a bone-conduction device and not a cochlear implant. My understanding is that the bone-conduction devices send sound waves to the working inner ear, which allows the brain to interpret the sounds; whereas, cochlear implants bypass the ear altogether and send signals directly to the auditory nerve. Two completely different types of mechanisms.

Please let me know if you have any questions that I can answer. I really want to help people who have the same types of questions and concerns that I had since there's not a lot of user information out there.

Jump to this post

Thanks, Sam.

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@lmayo

I just had the Osia 2 anchorage system implanted in my right ear on July 13 2021. The short surgery was not painful as I was under anesthesia, and it was just a little uncomfortable for a couple of days. My scalp is still numb on my right side although I am getting more feeling week by week. I received my processor on August 16th, and the change was immediate. Before surgery I was completely deaf on my right side due to sudden hearing loss 2 years ago (with severe vertigo). I tried the Cros, but my ear canal was too tiny to hold it, and it sounded like a tin can, Now I can hear everything through the bone conduction. Although I do have a regular hearing aid for my good ear, I do not use it unless I am going out in public. I no longer need it to watch TV or in one on one conversation because the Osia picks up the slack. I used to view TV with the closed captions because I would miss most of what was said. I can now tell where sound is coming from including when I am driving. I was becoming somewhat reclusive because I simply could not hear anything in a group, and I was also concerned that I could not tell what direction an emergency siren was coming from when I was driving. The Osia has been life changing for me. I do get a mild, occasional feedback, but we are still in the process of adjustment for the processor. I am wearing it for a month and making note of any issues, although I will say there are very few. We can make adjustments when I go back for followup. It has literally opened up my world.
If your ENT considers you a good candidate, you should definitely consider the Osia 2.
In answer to your question about sleeping, you do not sleep with the Osia attached. It is attached to a magnet in your scalp, and you simply remove it to sleep, shower, swim, etc. There is a waterproof cover you can purchase if you wish to use the processor while swimming. For the first three weeks after surgery, I did not sleep on the implant side,, but now I do. I hope this helps. If you have other questions, just post here.
Oh, and one other thing, the audiologist will have an Osia attached to a headband that you can try our to see if it will work for you. Even though the headband made a big difference, it is even better with the magnet on the bone.

Jump to this post

This device changed my life. I am an ER NURSE so this makes hearing amazing!

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