What's your review of Cochlear Osia 2 System?

Posted by edemmenegger @edemmenegger, Jun 12, 2021

I am getting the implants in a week or so. Would like to hear from people who are using these bone conduction devices.

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Hearing Loss group.

@tinytoon31

Hi Stephanie, you've been very helpful so far. I'm a candidate and im considering the Osia bone conducting surgery. I have SSHL since Dec 2019 and being in a group at a restaurant or at work (noisy hair salon) are so frustrating. even being passenger in the car (my left ear has no hearing), I can't have a conversation with the driver without turning my neck so much that im sore the next day.
anyways, your scar looks a bit intimidating on the first picture of course but already much better just a few weeks in. im assuming once the hair grows back, nobody can tell anymore. is the scar actually outside of your hairline? it looks very close. wonder if they can go a tiny bit in further so the scar won't show when you're wearing your hair in a high ponytail per say.

I have a couple of questions if you don't mind….
does it not feel overwhelming, specially in a louder setting to have all sound going into one ear?
does the microphone still work as good when the device is covered by hair?

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Thanks, @tinytoon31! Here are some current shots of my scar, which is pretty minimal/inconspicuous. You should discuss your scar concerns with your surgeon; they might be able to put it in your hairline.

Hearing with the Osia has never become overwhelming to me. It truly sounds natural and just like I'm hearing through my ear. The only times the volume has bothered me were when I allowed the device to stream phone calls to my device (I would randomly have a phone trill in my head when someone called. I've turned that feature off.) and when I've been streaming audio (music, videos, or audiobook) directly to the device when the volume was up too loud (I turned my phone's volume down to correct this.)

When I have my hair down, it covers my device. It hasn't seemed to affect the microphones at all. The only microphone issues have been wind and remembering to cover/protect the processor when it's raining (I guess that's not really a mic issue though).

Feel free to ask any additional questions you may have. I've been there, so I'm happy to help! ๐Ÿ™‚

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@sam2678

Thanks, @tinytoon31! Here are some current shots of my scar, which is pretty minimal/inconspicuous. You should discuss your scar concerns with your surgeon; they might be able to put it in your hairline.

Hearing with the Osia has never become overwhelming to me. It truly sounds natural and just like I'm hearing through my ear. The only times the volume has bothered me were when I allowed the device to stream phone calls to my device (I would randomly have a phone trill in my head when someone called. I've turned that feature off.) and when I've been streaming audio (music, videos, or audiobook) directly to the device when the volume was up too loud (I turned my phone's volume down to correct this.)

When I have my hair down, it covers my device. It hasn't seemed to affect the microphones at all. The only microphone issues have been wind and remembering to cover/protect the processor when it's raining (I guess that's not really a mic issue though).

Feel free to ask any additional questions you may have. I've been there, so I'm happy to help! ๐Ÿ™‚

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Thank you for sharing your story. It's fascinating to read about technology that wasn't even dreamed about when I was diagnosed with progressive sensorineural hearing loss in the '60s. I was told that nothing would ever change in my lifetime to help me remain in the hearing world. I was in my 20s then. I got a CI in my mid 60s and it has been a miracle. Things keep getting better. I LOVE to hear, and am so thankful!!

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@julieo4

Thank you for sharing your story. It's fascinating to read about technology that wasn't even dreamed about when I was diagnosed with progressive sensorineural hearing loss in the '60s. I was told that nothing would ever change in my lifetime to help me remain in the hearing world. I was in my 20s then. I got a CI in my mid 60s and it has been a miracle. Things keep getting better. I LOVE to hear, and am so thankful!!

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Wow! I'm so glad they were wrong, Julie! The total loss of hearing in my right ear on top of being hard of hearing in my left ear left me feeling pretty depressed (and isolated because of COVID and not being able to effectively communicate with others). It was through researching the various technologies that are available that I was able to quickly come to terms with the problem and shift to focusing on possible solutions, which pulled me out of my funk.

I learned so much from others who created videos on YouTube about their experiences with their hearing devices. Not seeing much info on the Osia made me want to connect to others to share. I don't want to create videos or be on film, so this forum was a good find.

After going through my hearing-loss and solution-implementation experiences, so many people I know have started talking to me about their friends or family members who have hearing issues and it's really eye opening to realize how many people don't address their hearing issues. That's so puzzling because if they had a hard time seeing, they'd likely go to the eye doctor for a solution. (I understand that many people can't hear or can't hear well and they're perfectly content and don't feel the need to modify their hearing situations–That's great; those aren't the people I'm referring to.) I wish hearing-related issues were more normalized and discussed more often. Some people wear glasses, some people wear hearing devices.

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@sam2678

Thanks, @tinytoon31! Here are some current shots of my scar, which is pretty minimal/inconspicuous. You should discuss your scar concerns with your surgeon; they might be able to put it in your hairline.

Hearing with the Osia has never become overwhelming to me. It truly sounds natural and just like I'm hearing through my ear. The only times the volume has bothered me were when I allowed the device to stream phone calls to my device (I would randomly have a phone trill in my head when someone called. I've turned that feature off.) and when I've been streaming audio (music, videos, or audiobook) directly to the device when the volume was up too loud (I turned my phone's volume down to correct this.)

When I have my hair down, it covers my device. It hasn't seemed to affect the microphones at all. The only microphone issues have been wind and remembering to cover/protect the processor when it's raining (I guess that's not really a mic issue though).

Feel free to ask any additional questions you may have. I've been there, so I'm happy to help! ๐Ÿ™‚

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Wow that healed great, its really barely noticeable! I do wear my hair in a ponytail most of the time, wonder if it can be somewhat hidden under the hair instead of just sticking it over it.
im glad to hear you are so happy with the outcome, it gives me more reassurance to proceed.
am I correct that the all the sound will be just transferred to the "good ear"? hence my question if all sound into one ear isn't overwhelming. i might be confused on that part.
thank you so much for the support and help on getting a better understanding. I truly appreciate the time!

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@tinytoon31

Wow that healed great, its really barely noticeable! I do wear my hair in a ponytail most of the time, wonder if it can be somewhat hidden under the hair instead of just sticking it over it.
im glad to hear you are so happy with the outcome, it gives me more reassurance to proceed.
am I correct that the all the sound will be just transferred to the "good ear"? hence my question if all sound into one ear isn't overwhelming. i might be confused on that part.
thank you so much for the support and help on getting a better understanding. I truly appreciate the time!

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Thanks, @tinytoon31! If you're good at doing hair and have enough of it (neither of these apply to me lol), you can probably finesse it so that the device is covered. The Osia also comes with a cloth headband you can wear for working out. The band covers the device, so that might be another option if it goes with your style at all.

I'm not certain about all of the sound being transferred to the good ear. I lost all hearing on my right side and was already hard of hearing on my left side. The docs initially thought they'd implant a bone-conduction device on each side; however, they decided later that my bone-conduction scores on the right (deaf) side were too low and that the sound would just go to the left ear–I'm not certain about this information though because I had a lot of info coming at me at this time. I ended up getting the Osia only on my left side, which means I can hear great on my left side now but I'm still deaf on my right side.

It's a good thing to ask your audiologist about. I'm going to ask mine about it at my next as well–just to gain some clarity because I think I've got it confused. ๐Ÿ™‚ If I could have a bone-conduction device installed on my right side and the sound could be picked up on the left side, I'd certainly do that. But, based on what I've seen of the Osia installation and placement requirements (there's a YouTube video about it), I'm not certain that the vibrations from the right side of my skull would be strong enough for my left ear to pick up, if that makes sense. If you get clarification from your audiologist, please share with me.

REPLY
@sam2678

Thanks, @tinytoon31! If you're good at doing hair and have enough of it (neither of these apply to me lol), you can probably finesse it so that the device is covered. The Osia also comes with a cloth headband you can wear for working out. The band covers the device, so that might be another option if it goes with your style at all.

I'm not certain about all of the sound being transferred to the good ear. I lost all hearing on my right side and was already hard of hearing on my left side. The docs initially thought they'd implant a bone-conduction device on each side; however, they decided later that my bone-conduction scores on the right (deaf) side were too low and that the sound would just go to the left ear–I'm not certain about this information though because I had a lot of info coming at me at this time. I ended up getting the Osia only on my left side, which means I can hear great on my left side now but I'm still deaf on my right side.

It's a good thing to ask your audiologist about. I'm going to ask mine about it at my next as well–just to gain some clarity because I think I've got it confused. ๐Ÿ™‚ If I could have a bone-conduction device installed on my right side and the sound could be picked up on the left side, I'd certainly do that. But, based on what I've seen of the Osia installation and placement requirements (there's a YouTube video about it), I'm not certain that the vibrations from the right side of my skull would be strong enough for my left ear to pick up, if that makes sense. If you get clarification from your audiologist, please share with me.

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@tinytoon31, I found this information online that seems to support the idea that the signal can be sent to the better hearing side:
"Bone conduction hearing system: A bone conduction or bone-anchored hearing system includes an external sound processor that attaches to a headband or a surgical implant. The sound processor picks up sound from the poorer-hearing side and sends it to the better hearing ear by bone conduction. The goal of the bone-anchored hearing system for single-sided deafness is to provide sound awareness on the poorer-hearing side. Bone-anchored hearing systems do not restore hearing in the ear with hearing loss. Instead, they allow you to be aware of sounds on the side with the non-functional ear. Bone-anchored hearing systems also do not help with ringing in the ear or sound localization but may be a good option particularly when a cochlear implant is not an option."

Source: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/21625-unilateral-hearing-loss-single-sided-deafness

Now I'm going to have to see about getting something on my right side! ๐Ÿ™‚

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@sam2678

Wow! I'm so glad they were wrong, Julie! The total loss of hearing in my right ear on top of being hard of hearing in my left ear left me feeling pretty depressed (and isolated because of COVID and not being able to effectively communicate with others). It was through researching the various technologies that are available that I was able to quickly come to terms with the problem and shift to focusing on possible solutions, which pulled me out of my funk.

I learned so much from others who created videos on YouTube about their experiences with their hearing devices. Not seeing much info on the Osia made me want to connect to others to share. I don't want to create videos or be on film, so this forum was a good find.

After going through my hearing-loss and solution-implementation experiences, so many people I know have started talking to me about their friends or family members who have hearing issues and it's really eye opening to realize how many people don't address their hearing issues. That's so puzzling because if they had a hard time seeing, they'd likely go to the eye doctor for a solution. (I understand that many people can't hear or can't hear well and they're perfectly content and don't feel the need to modify their hearing situations–That's great; those aren't the people I'm referring to.) I wish hearing-related issues were more normalized and discussed more often. Some people wear glasses, some people wear hearing devices.

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Hearing loss is far more common that people realize. Unfortunately, there remains stigma attached to hearing loss, so many people hide it and won't talk about it. I am very thankful to The Hearing Loss Assn. of America (HLAA) for opening up dialogue on HL. This organization has encouraged research in technology and medicine, while establishing chapters that bring people together to talk about their experiences, frustrations, hopes, etc. I encourage everyone who lives with hearing loss to connect to HLAA. This is the only national consumer organization that represents us, while providing opportunities for us to learn. Do check it out. http://www.hearingloss.org The mission of HLAA is to educate, to share information, to provide peer support and to advocate. The majority of HLAA members are interested in remaining in the hearing mainstream and strive to do that. Technology keeps getting better. Maybe, in time, there will actually be cures for some kinds of hearing loss. I am hopeful.

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@julieo4

Hearing loss is far more common that people realize. Unfortunately, there remains stigma attached to hearing loss, so many people hide it and won't talk about it. I am very thankful to The Hearing Loss Assn. of America (HLAA) for opening up dialogue on HL. This organization has encouraged research in technology and medicine, while establishing chapters that bring people together to talk about their experiences, frustrations, hopes, etc. I encourage everyone who lives with hearing loss to connect to HLAA. This is the only national consumer organization that represents us, while providing opportunities for us to learn. Do check it out. http://www.hearingloss.org The mission of HLAA is to educate, to share information, to provide peer support and to advocate. The majority of HLAA members are interested in remaining in the hearing mainstream and strive to do that. Technology keeps getting better. Maybe, in time, there will actually be cures for some kinds of hearing loss. I am hopeful.

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I'll definitely check out the HLAA, Julie. Thanks! I'm hopeful about future cures as well.

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@sam2678

Thanks, @tinytoon31! If you're good at doing hair and have enough of it (neither of these apply to me lol), you can probably finesse it so that the device is covered. The Osia also comes with a cloth headband you can wear for working out. The band covers the device, so that might be another option if it goes with your style at all.

I'm not certain about all of the sound being transferred to the good ear. I lost all hearing on my right side and was already hard of hearing on my left side. The docs initially thought they'd implant a bone-conduction device on each side; however, they decided later that my bone-conduction scores on the right (deaf) side were too low and that the sound would just go to the left ear–I'm not certain about this information though because I had a lot of info coming at me at this time. I ended up getting the Osia only on my left side, which means I can hear great on my left side now but I'm still deaf on my right side.

It's a good thing to ask your audiologist about. I'm going to ask mine about it at my next as well–just to gain some clarity because I think I've got it confused. ๐Ÿ™‚ If I could have a bone-conduction device installed on my right side and the sound could be picked up on the left side, I'd certainly do that. But, based on what I've seen of the Osia installation and placement requirements (there's a YouTube video about it), I'm not certain that the vibrations from the right side of my skull would be strong enough for my left ear to pick up, if that makes sense. If you get clarification from your audiologist, please share with me.

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oh I see. so you don have the bone conduction Osia? but the cochlea implant? I think I've gotten confused with the different types but yet similar names for it…

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@tinytoon31

oh I see. so you don have the bone conduction Osia? but the cochlea implant? I think I've gotten confused with the different types but yet similar names for it…

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No, I definitely have the Osia, but it's on the side where I have only partial hearing loss. I have nothing on my deaf side.

I'm saying that I want to investigate having one put on my right side (the deaf side) as well.

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@sam2678

No, I definitely have the Osia, but it's on the side where I have only partial hearing loss. I have nothing on my deaf side.

I'm saying that I want to investigate having one put on my right side (the deaf side) as well.

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oh ok. sorry for the confusion…its a lot of info. does http mean in your case, if you got it on your deaf side, that the sound would be transferred to the left side? because that would be the case for me. since I have no hearing at all on one side all sound will be transferred to the good side. so I won't still really know where sound is coming from but at least I will hear it. that's what im picturing. Cochlear Osia System 2 I believe is the name for it

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Hi, Everyone! Thanks so much for contributing to the discussion. I'm getting the Osia 2 implant in January, and reading some of your comments had made me feel much better.
I have a new question: Do any of you wear reading glasses? I wear them, and always push them up on my forehead when I'm not reading. Is the device far enough back on your head so your glasses don't bother it?
Thanks!
RJ

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