Brachioradial pruritus. (severe itching on forearms and neck, no rash).

Posted by Patrick Cotter @patrickcotter, Mar 19, 2012

Does anyone know of this. I think its rare but does exist. My neurologist does not know about this. I have compression between my c5 and c6 cervical disk and have had alot of sun damage to my skin.

Liked by karenvduke

Options do nothing, dermatologists think you have dry skin. I used one for years, then stopped for the rest. They assume you don't know the difference which is typical. I had a cervical and brain mri for something else a few months earlier and re-read it. I have spent a lifetime doing research, discovering the problem and confirming it with doctors. Frustrating I have had to do all the research for all my illnesses. Not sure why one dermatologist did not figure it out. All I got was try light therapy but that will cause issues with lupus. Plus insurance didn't cover it.

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They have upgraded me to 2700 mg of gabapentin a day but it seems to help alot. Ice is still the only thing for me for relief and if I get 4hrs sleep a night in the bed I've done good. Long sleeves drives it completely nuts. I do better on sleeping if i just sit in a recliner. Now the condition was not as bad when i was younger but the past 2 years it's almost constant every night. A little in the day time but not much itching then. It's like an attack from the inside of the arms when i wake up or it wakes me up. Again it takes ice to settle it down.

Liked by itchy2

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I'm getting some relief by taking one Zyrtec in the morning and 2 Benadryl at night. Not perfect, but better

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@bjmart

Have had this for about 10 yrs. Have tried everything (Ice & Gabapentin delivering the best relief). Currently I am being treated with a series of PIT Injections (Founded by Lyftogt). After the 2nd series of shots, I have now been itch free for a week and stopped taking the gabapentin. Scheduled to do a few more series of the shots, and will post updates

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Just had 3rd series of PIT shots. 3 1/2 weeks virtually itch free. Off Gabapentin for last 3 weeks for first time in over 5 years. Scheduled for 2 more series of shots this month. Too early to tell for sure, but extremely promising.

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@bjmart

Just had 3rd series of PIT shots. 3 1/2 weeks virtually itch free. Off Gabapentin for last 3 weeks for first time in over 5 years. Scheduled for 2 more series of shots this month. Too early to tell for sure, but extremely promising.

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That’s awesome! Thanks for the update! The concept makes sense!

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@bjmart

Just had 3rd series of PIT shots. 3 1/2 weeks virtually itch free. Off Gabapentin for last 3 weeks for first time in over 5 years. Scheduled for 2 more series of shots this month. Too early to tell for sure, but extremely promising.

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Liked by bobbiellen

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So glad to have discovered this group. This itching/burning forearms is a new development for me, within the last 6 mos. I was on Ammiodarone for 3 years for heart arrhythmia and had neurological issues with it, loss of balance, mental fog, neuropathy etc. It also makes you sunsensitive and I had to keep arms covered and slather on UV protection all year round. I would get the burning sensation in my arms if I had been out for even 10 minutes regardless of sunscreen use. I have been off of the Ammio since last February. I know it has a very long residual effect in the body. I am wondering and suspicious that somehow the meds have damaged the nerves in my skin and that is related to the onset of this forearm itching. Has anyone else noticed this kind of connection?

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@itchy2

So glad to have discovered this group. This itching/burning forearms is a new development for me, within the last 6 mos. I was on Ammiodarone for 3 years for heart arrhythmia and had neurological issues with it, loss of balance, mental fog, neuropathy etc. It also makes you sunsensitive and I had to keep arms covered and slather on UV protection all year round. I would get the burning sensation in my arms if I had been out for even 10 minutes regardless of sunscreen use. I have been off of the Ammio since last February. I know it has a very long residual effect in the body. I am wondering and suspicious that somehow the meds have damaged the nerves in my skin and that is related to the onset of this forearm itching. Has anyone else noticed this kind of connection?

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My research has revealed there are many possible reasons for sensory nerve pain causing itching and burning with no visible rash or external skin irritation. Much of it is a mystery even to doctor. However, there are many possible remedies and treatments to calm the sensory nerves as you can tell from reading what others have done or tried, from oral medications to topical treatments and then just common sense stuff like exercise, diet and rest.

Personally, after trying everything natural and topically, I resorted to returning to a former anti- anxiety medication that works on the central nervous system called Lexapro and got about a 90% improvement. However, the more common oral medications for this are amitrytaline, Elavil, Pamelor and especially Gabapentin.

In addition, I am using a compounded cream at night, when the itching tends to surface most, and it works for the night for me. It has ketamine, amitryptaline and lidocaine in a lipoderm vase, and is expensive.

Finally, many are getting complete relief, needing no oral or topical medications with PIT injections, mentioned above. I am going for PIT treatment next week. My brother’s good friend is a doc and has been fixing this treatment for years with much success. It is a natural method and calms the sensory nerves. Follow the posts to see the results on this from some of us! .

Liked by itchy2

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@bobbiellen

My research has revealed there are many possible reasons for sensory nerve pain causing itching and burning with no visible rash or external skin irritation. Much of it is a mystery even to doctor. However, there are many possible remedies and treatments to calm the sensory nerves as you can tell from reading what others have done or tried, from oral medications to topical treatments and then just common sense stuff like exercise, diet and rest.

Personally, after trying everything natural and topically, I resorted to returning to a former anti- anxiety medication that works on the central nervous system called Lexapro and got about a 90% improvement. However, the more common oral medications for this are amitrytaline, Elavil, Pamelor and especially Gabapentin.

In addition, I am using a compounded cream at night, when the itching tends to surface most, and it works for the night for me. It has ketamine, amitryptaline and lidocaine in a lipoderm vase, and is expensive.

Finally, many are getting complete relief, needing no oral or topical medications with PIT injections, mentioned above. I am going for PIT treatment next week. My brother’s good friend is a doc and has been fixing this treatment for years with much success. It is a natural method and calms the sensory nerves. Follow the posts to see the results on this from some of us! .

Jump to this post

What is the PIT injection? How often do you get them & how long do they help? How costly is it? Thank you!

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@bobbiellen

My research has revealed there are many possible reasons for sensory nerve pain causing itching and burning with no visible rash or external skin irritation. Much of it is a mystery even to doctor. However, there are many possible remedies and treatments to calm the sensory nerves as you can tell from reading what others have done or tried, from oral medications to topical treatments and then just common sense stuff like exercise, diet and rest.

Personally, after trying everything natural and topically, I resorted to returning to a former anti- anxiety medication that works on the central nervous system called Lexapro and got about a 90% improvement. However, the more common oral medications for this are amitrytaline, Elavil, Pamelor and especially Gabapentin.

In addition, I am using a compounded cream at night, when the itching tends to surface most, and it works for the night for me. It has ketamine, amitryptaline and lidocaine in a lipoderm vase, and is expensive.

Finally, many are getting complete relief, needing no oral or topical medications with PIT injections, mentioned above. I am going for PIT treatment next week. My brother’s good friend is a doc and has been fixing this treatment for years with much success. It is a natural method and calms the sensory nerves. Follow the posts to see the results on this from some of us! .

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Thank you, my GP has arranged a referral to a dermatologist but I’d like to take some information in with me. I will see what PIT is all about on here.

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@needahelp

What is the PIT injection? How often do you get them & how long do they help? How costly is it? Thank you!

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Check out bjmart's link above for some details.

PIT = peri-neural injection treatment; depends upon doc, but usually every week to two weeks but only for like 3-5/6 sessions, depending upon your situation; cost varies alot – find a reasonably priced doc – could be as little as $25 per syringe which yeilds about 6-8 shots or it could be $200 for a treatment and then you would have to see how the doc defines a treatment – maybe 4-5 shots?……; how long – I can't really answer, but the idea is that once you finish the 4-6 treatments, it is over completely.

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@itchy2

Thank you, my GP has arranged a referral to a dermatologist but I’d like to take some information in with me. I will see what PIT is all about on here.

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NOTE: You may find that many regular MD's don't know about this…….if you can find a functional medicine MD, then he/she most likely keeps himself/herself updated on current therapies for unusual issues like this.

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Thank you!

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@bobbiellen

NOTE: You may find that many regular MD's don't know about this…….if you can find a functional medicine MD, then he/she most likely keeps himself/herself updated on current therapies for unusual issues like this.

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I wanted to add to this discussion in case it would benefit anyone. Itching is a form of pain at the low end of the pain scale, and that pain can be caused by inflammation, but also by nerve compression. If you have an issue with tight muscles or poor posture with abnormal body mechanics, it might be a physical issue that a physical therapist could help. I have thoracic outlet syndrome which make my shoulders go forward and the front of my chest wall muscles are too tight. I've had itching in my scapula area, and forearm pain and itching too, but my recent physical therapy session that is working on getting my scapulas back into a normal position by strengthening the muscles that hold it, is helping me. If anyone can relate to something like that, a PT evaluation might be a good next step. My PT also does myofascial release work that stretches the overly tight fascia. See myofascialrelease.com for info.

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@bobbiellen

NOTE: You may find that many regular MD's don't know about this…….if you can find a functional medicine MD, then he/she most likely keeps himself/herself updated on current therapies for unusual issues like this.

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That is true, but MD's do not do they a therapy. DO's are trained in this therapy only, it's part of their training.

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