B-6 vitamin danger!

Posted by Lynsorensen @lynsorensen, Dec 11, 2017

With the assistance of a neurologist at Mayo Clinic, I have almost completely eliminated the uncontrolled muscle spasms now. First and foremost: beware of taking multi-vitamin capsules that have B6 listed. B-6 overdosage (which is contained in every multivitamin I found in stores and on the internet) can cause loss of muscle control and spasms in some people. So can gluten found in many foods so now I am also gluten free. I now work out with a personal trainer 3 days a week and do water aerobics another 2 days. Got off gabapentin and also clonazepam. Using CBD oil capsules each morning (no more opioids or chemicals) and using a CBD topical ointment to rub on my leg muscles each night. He says I don’t need him anymore! And I don’t. No more shaking or muscle cramps or pain. Still a little numbness but that is receding also.

@jesfactsmon

That is great that you have a strong faith @sunnyflower. With all the stupidity in our world today, with people arguing about ridiculous things, politics, etc., I just wish most people appreciated how good their lives are and enjoy the blessings of just being able to live without suffering as some such as you do, I think their lives would be infinitely better. You are an inspiration and I am glad to hear you describe the strength that your faith gives to you. All the best to you.

Jump to this post

Thank you for your kind words Hank!

REPLY
@johnbishop

Hello @linnythepoo – I love that user name! Welcome to Mayo Connect – I’m happy you found us. It is a great place to ask questions, share your health concerns and learn what others with similar health issues are doing for treatment. Yikes is right from my perspective but I have no medical training or background. I would want to get an opinion or see a neurologist first.

Have you received a diagnosis of a form of neuropathy from a neurologist or had any tests to confirm the diagnosis?

I had a roundabout discussion through a 3rd party who I asked to check out a list of supplements that I’m taking for my peripheral neuropathy and this person giving the opinion was a neurologist. They said meh to my supplements and said they would probably recommend Metanx which contains L-methylfolate calcium, an active form of folate, and other essential B vitamins (B6 and B12) instead. B12 is in my list of supplements but I had already heard some bad stuff about B6 so I filed her opinion away under the category – it’s my body, my decision. It’s really a good idea to learn everything you can about your health condition and any drug used for treatment paying close attention to any side effects. I don’t have any medical training or background so this is just based on my opinion and how I’ve dealt with my own idiopathic small fiber peripheral neuropathy.

Here’s a more reliable source from the University of Virginia Health System – Peripheral Neuropathy and Vitamin B6 (PDF):
https://cancer.uvahealth.com/images-and-docs/neuropathy.pdf
Hope this helps,
John

Jump to this post

So is B12 ok to take?

REPLY
@azgama

So is B12 ok to take?

Jump to this post

Hello @azgama, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Here is some information from Mayo Clinic on vitamin B-12 that may help — https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-vitamin-b12/art-20363663. Also the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements has a Factsheet for Consumers here: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-Consumer/.

Can I ask what made you decide to find out more about Vitamin B-12?

REPLY

Regarding the discussions about B6 and B12, it's important to remember that every individual is different, and our individual need for those B vitamins and other vitamins is different. Some of us need more than the suggested daily allowance.

REPLY
@steeldove

Regarding the discussions about B6 and B12, it's important to remember that every individual is different, and our individual need for those B vitamins and other vitamins is different. Some of us need more than the suggested daily allowance.

Jump to this post

so true but many articles state that most people derive enough B vits. from the food they eat; so should we be taking more even if our labs show a normal range? I’ve gotten the sense here that if you have a form of neuropathy you should be taking B12, so I have been confused as to whether or not supplementing actually can help if you have no deficiency which caused your problem. Helen

REPLY
@helennicola

so true but many articles state that most people derive enough B vits. from the food they eat; so should we be taking more even if our labs show a normal range? I’ve gotten the sense here that if you have a form of neuropathy you should be taking B12, so I have been confused as to whether or not supplementing actually can help if you have no deficiency which caused your problem. Helen

Jump to this post

@helencola I agree we are each different and should run supplements by our doctors. I do take B-12 along with other supplements for my peripheral neuropathy with the exception of B-6 since it is different than the other B vitamins. Here's some additional links for more information.

Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy – Nutritional and Vitamin Deficiency Neuropathy:
https://www.foundationforpn.org/what-is-peripheral-neuropathy/causes/vitamin-nutrition-deficiency/

What is the purpose of a vitamin B-12 level test?:
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322286

Liked by lioness

REPLY
@johnbishop

@helencola I agree we are each different and should run supplements by our doctors. I do take B-12 along with other supplements for my peripheral neuropathy with the exception of B-6 since it is different than the other B vitamins. Here's some additional links for more information.

Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy – Nutritional and Vitamin Deficiency Neuropathy:
https://www.foundationforpn.org/what-is-peripheral-neuropathy/causes/vitamin-nutrition-deficiency/

What is the purpose of a vitamin B-12 level test?:
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322286

Jump to this post

@helencola . As you age your body loses a lot of its vitamins and minerals especially the ones our body does'nt make so you need to supplement to keep healthy . B 6 is known as the nerve vitamin and if you lack it you can get not only neuropathy but a lot of other things out body needs as well a B 12

REPLY
@johnbishop

Hello @azgama, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Here is some information from Mayo Clinic on vitamin B-12 that may help — https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-vitamin-b12/art-20363663. Also the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements has a Factsheet for Consumers here: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-Consumer/.

Can I ask what made you decide to find out more about Vitamin B-12?

Jump to this post

I was told that it would boost my energy and help with my anemia. Been taking the ones that dissolve under your tongue for many years. Just saw this site and the talk of B6 was interesting and wondered about B12

REPLY

Hi @azgama. Yes, B-12 can increase your body’s energy and also help with the anemia caused by a lack of B-12. There are other causes of anemia. For each type of anemia, the treatment is different. For example, an iron supplement will help an anemia caused by a deficiency in iron. Your body does not produce B-12. Any foods derived from an animal source will contain B-12 like eggs, milk, meat, and fish. A person needs the intrinsic factor in their intestine for absorption if taken orally. For people who lack the ability to absorb through their digestive system, B-12 is also prescribed to be given in injection form subcutaneously.

Liked by azgama

REPLY
@lioness

@helencola . As you age your body loses a lot of its vitamins and minerals especially the ones our body does'nt make so you need to supplement to keep healthy . B 6 is known as the nerve vitamin and if you lack it you can get not only neuropathy but a lot of other things out body needs as well a B 12

Jump to this post

I am still confused! It seems as if you John and Lioness are both saying you think one should supplement with B12 vitamins (not food) even if you are not deficient, according to your lab results which have shown to be of a normal range?That would suggest that B12 actually can benefit even when a deficiency was not the cause of neuropathy as is the case with some.I did read those articles among others but they did not really address my question. Thanks, Helen

REPLY
@helennicola

I am still confused! It seems as if you John and Lioness are both saying you think one should supplement with B12 vitamins (not food) even if you are not deficient, according to your lab results which have shown to be of a normal range?That would suggest that B12 actually can benefit even when a deficiency was not the cause of neuropathy as is the case with some.I did read those articles among others but they did not really address my question. Thanks, Helen

Jump to this post

@helencola I supplement with B-12 along with other supplements because it helps with my neuropathy.

REPLY
@johnbishop

@helencola I supplement with B-12 along with other supplements because it helps with my neuropathy.

Jump to this post

thanks for your response John. Helen

REPLY
@helennicola

I am still confused! It seems as if you John and Lioness are both saying you think one should supplement with B12 vitamins (not food) even if you are not deficient, according to your lab results which have shown to be of a normal range?That would suggest that B12 actually can benefit even when a deficiency was not the cause of neuropathy as is the case with some.I did read those articles among others but they did not really address my question. Thanks, Helen

Jump to this post

@helencola I use Vit B 12 along with whatever I eat as I said before as we age our bodies lose the naturel vitamins we have in our bodies all our lives so even though we eat the food that has the B -12 in it our bodies are still deficient . However if you have a disease that is low in B-12 as with neuropathy then its not going to hurt your normal labs For instance I have fibromyalgia and I take about 450mg of magnesium a day as fibro patients need more mag. My labs are in normal limits. Does this make sense ?

REPLY
@johnbishop

Hi @airialsmith, welcome to Connect. I know vitamin b6 toxicity can be hard to pin down. I found a website with a lot of good information that may be helpful to you.

Find Out the Real Reason For Vitamin B6 Toxicity
https://www.easy-immune-health.com/vitamin-b6-toxicity.html

@airialsmith have you ever been tested for the MTHFR gene? The MTHFR gene is extremely common and can lead to a problem processing the B Vitamins.

Mayo Clinic is very good at diagnosing health issues that are difficult to diagnose. If you would like to seek help from Mayo Clinic, you can contact one of their appointment offices. The contact information for Minnesota, Arizona and Florida can be found here:

Mayo Clinic Contact Information: http://mayocl.in/1mtmR63.

John

Jump to this post

Thanks for this pay as I have MTHFR and although I've done writer a butt of research on it, I don't recall seeing anything about B vitamins processing being an issue. I'm having an issue with B12, have SFN and PN. Heading to check my supplements for B6 for toxicity. I seem to fit into the this group with thyroid and other diagnosis.
My daughter has issues and is on a B Complex. We might need to rethink that. She's going on 23 and I suspect she's got Fibro or CFS like me or POTS. Salt tablets are there only way she can tolerate our Texas heat.

REPLY

I came across this recent article that seems to indicate that it is specifically the pyridoxine form of B6 that can kill cells. (There are other forms, such as pyridoxal, pyridoxal-5-phosphate and pyridoxamine that DON'T injure cells.)

You can buy pyridoxal-5-phosphate and get a prescription for pyridoxamine, but the form most readily available in most supplements is pyridoxine!

Toxicol In Vitro
. 2017 Oct;44:206-212. doi: 10.1016/j.tiv.2017.07.009. Epub 2017 Jul 14.
The Vitamin B6 Paradox: Supplementation With High Concentrations of Pyridoxine Leads to Decreased Vitamin B6 Function

Misha F Vrolijk 1 , Antoon Opperhuizen 2 , Eugène H J M Jansen 3 , Geja J Hageman 4 , Aalt Bast 4 , Guido R M M Haenen 4
Affiliations expand
PMID: 28716455 DOI: 10.1016/j.tiv.2017.07.009
Abstract

Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a coenzyme in many reactions involved in amino acid, carbohydrates and lipid metabolism. Since 2014, >50 cases of sensory neuronal pain due to vitamin B6 supplementation were reported. Up to now, the mechanism of this toxicity is enigmatic and the contribution of the various B6 vitamers to this toxicity is largely unknown. In the present study, the neurotoxicity of the different forms of vitamin B6 is tested on SHSY5Y and CaCo-2 cells. Cells were exposed to pyridoxine, pyridoxamine, pyridoxal, pyridoxal-5-phosphate or pyridoxamine-5-phosphate for 24h, after which cell viability was measured using the MTT assay. The expression of Bax and caspase-8 was tested after the 24h exposure. The effect of the vitamers on two pyridoxal-5-phosphate dependent enzymes was also tested. Pyridoxine induced cell death in a concentration-dependent way in SHSY5Y cells. The other vitamers did not affect cell viability. Pyridoxine significantly increased the expression of Bax and caspase-8. Moreover, both pyridoxal-5-phosphate dependent enzymes were inhibited by pyridoxine. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the neuropathy observed after taking a relatively high dose of vitamin B6 supplements is due to pyridoxine. The inactive form pyridoxine competitively inhibits the active pyridoxal-5'-phosphate. Consequently, symptoms of vitamin B6 supplementation are similar to those of vitamin B6 deficiency.

Keywords: Neuropathy; Neurotoxic; Pyridoxine; Supplements; Vitamin B6.

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.