Apple pie and ice cream.

Posted by jdiakiw @jdiakiw, Oct 3 9:23am

Putting aside all other possible co-morbidities , I am trying to understand my data in my first week in my diagnosis and insulin injections. After a donut and coffee ( 1 tsp star) for breakfast. And fish and chips for lunch and a small serving of apple pie, I wonder does it matter what I eat as long as I am over 70% in my target zone and for the most part of a day I am in the optimum blue target area?

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Sorry, I do not understand target zones and and insulin shots because I have only had insulin shots in the hospital when the pain drugs raised my blood sugar. It has little to do with what I eat. Many of us here are dedicated to lowering our blood sugar with diet and exercise, which a few doctors don't believe we have the discipline to do for our health. Apparently you are in the high blood sugar zone and need to see a nutritionist to improve your diet. Using drugs to manage your blood sugar takes some education about your body and how it works when you have diabetes. The type and amount of food you eat changes the dynamic, as well as exercise and activity. I would never eat a donut and coffee for breakfast, diabetes or not. The chips and apple pie for lunch was a dangerous thing to do as well unless you plan to run a few miles after lunch. I might add that my target zone is lower than what most doctors choose for good health. I don't want damaged eyes, damaged brain, obesity, and my declining hearing to get any worse. And I like to stay awake during the day, so I choose a low carb diet, lots of protein, veggies, some fruit, and a little whole grain bread. Study the amount of carbs in white foods and choose wisely. That will do you more good and protect your future health than this confusing apparatus you are using without much education about diabetes. Start reading on the web and you will get good information to help you choose and learn about how your blood sugar functions with diabetes. If I had a couple of hours, I could explain it all to you and you would be on a good path for better health. At this point your health is at risk . i know because I watched my husband die. Dorisena

Liked by Leonard

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@dorisena

Sorry, I do not understand target zones and and insulin shots because I have only had insulin shots in the hospital when the pain drugs raised my blood sugar. It has little to do with what I eat. Many of us here are dedicated to lowering our blood sugar with diet and exercise, which a few doctors don't believe we have the discipline to do for our health. Apparently you are in the high blood sugar zone and need to see a nutritionist to improve your diet. Using drugs to manage your blood sugar takes some education about your body and how it works when you have diabetes. The type and amount of food you eat changes the dynamic, as well as exercise and activity. I would never eat a donut and coffee for breakfast, diabetes or not. The chips and apple pie for lunch was a dangerous thing to do as well unless you plan to run a few miles after lunch. I might add that my target zone is lower than what most doctors choose for good health. I don't want damaged eyes, damaged brain, obesity, and my declining hearing to get any worse. And I like to stay awake during the day, so I choose a low carb diet, lots of protein, veggies, some fruit, and a little whole grain bread. Study the amount of carbs in white foods and choose wisely. That will do you more good and protect your future health than this confusing apparatus you are using without much education about diabetes. Start reading on the web and you will get good information to help you choose and learn about how your blood sugar functions with diabetes. If I had a couple of hours, I could explain it all to you and you would be on a good path for better health. At this point your health is at risk . i know because I watched my husband die. Dorisena

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I looked at your chart again, and notice that the target zone is misleading. What it says is that for one fourth of your day you are at risk for diabetic disease damage, and the rest of the day you are probably safe from something. I wouldn't accept that at all. Read about glycemic index and learn that donuts, chips, apple pie, and ice cream are enemies to your health right now. Yes, it matters, to answer your question. Fourteen years after I started, I can indulge on occasion, but I know once is enough. Pasta once a month is o.k. for me.
Cake on my birthday is o.k. but I will probably get a headache. Donuts are addicting to me because I can't eat just one. Start studying.
It is what you eat and how much you move. The machine is not the cure. You don't want to go half way in this battle. Dorisena

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I understand all that. But it is not my point. If I keep within all my target blood sugar levels what does it matter what I eat? I am very knowledgeable about nutrition and know how to eat healthily for longevity . I live by my bible the glycemic index But I think my daily sugar level is my guide and as long as I keep on target that is all that is important (apart from possible co-morbidites)

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Let's be simple about this. Yes, it matters what you eat, and you want your blood sugar levels to be at the bottom of your target level for longevity, Choose what level you want, that is up to you. Remember that the blood sugar level in your body goes up and down during a 24 hour period. That matters. You want to feel good, that matters. You want to get vitamins and minerals in your diet for good health as you age. It matters. It is debatable what target is acceptable for your health. I choose a lower level because I don't want to be obese and have declining eyesight, hearing, brain health, and osteoporosis, and God knows what else as I age. I watched my sister die, sitting in a chair, drooling, dozing off, and experiencing schizophrenia. That is no way to die. Dorisena

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Thanks. My doc explained I will spike after every meal above the target zone up to 10 or 11 . It is natural and expected . But the goal is to keep in my target area(below7) 60% of the time I’m at over 70%

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@dorisena my heart goes out to you about your sister. Did she have diabetes too?

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You are choosing a different method and level than I can endorse, based on my experience and study. Good luck. I am not your doctor and my study and experience with my health plan has been very successful for me. You are not getting well by any means, but just containing your diabetic disease. The science and medical world are changing their view as some doctors are claiming a "cure" for serious diabetes following new protocols. We could argue about their degree of success at this time, but it is a step in the right direction. Yes, I believe it matters to protect my eyes, my hearing, and my mind, my joints, my spine, my old age. I am old, you know. I am 85 and ready to do any project that doesn't involve heavy lifting, because of my back. Dorisena

Liked by Leonard

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@tjgisewhite

@dorisena my heart goes out to you about your sister. Did she have diabetes too?

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Yes, my sister saw six specialists and didn't follow their instructions. She said her diabetes doctor was confusing her. She over ate and cooked fattening foods until she fit nicely into her husband's Hawaian shirt at a little over five feet tall. She smoked but gave it up when she had pneumonia and that is when the drinking got worse. She blamed me for not helping her with her medical problems but criticized every suggestion I made, so I finally told her I didn't know the answer. She claimed she was suicidal and about drove me nuts on the phone. Her arthritis was bad, and the shots in her knee didn't help. She had shots in her eyes for macular degeneration but wasn't able to drive in the end. She lived with a bag of potato chips by her side. I finally quit calling her, for a mental rest, and my sister-in-law and her daughter criticized me more than once for not "helping" my sister. She couldn't be helped. I mourn the good days we had in our past when we gardened, sewed projects, and enjoyed her skilled ceramics hobby. My sister ate herself to death. Dorisena

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Once again,Dorisena, you have expressed a healthy response to an overbearing condition. You are impressive for overcoming so much abuse from your closest relatives,the people you loved and wanted to love (and support ) you back. I am right now dealing with a difficult family situation and this gives me courage and renews strength of purpose. Thank you.

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@jdiakiw

Thanks. My doc explained I will spike after every meal above the target zone up to 10 or 11 . It is natural and expected . But the goal is to keep in my target area(below7) 60% of the time I’m at over 70%

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Of course, a person's blood sugar will spike after eating a high carb meal. But a person doesn't have to choose to have that happen as it could cause damage in the long term. My cousin was advised to not allow her blood sugar to go beyond 160 or 180. A nurse at a heart clinic advised me that any blood sugar over 200 on a regular basis is a cause for concern. My late husband would not test and laughed at his occasional numbers and high blood pressure. He wanted to show how tough he was. If you want to keep your diabetes at its current level and keep your insulin shots, then you can do that. Type two diabetics can do much better than "control" and in some cases can get back to normal blood sugar levels. Over time, my pre-diabetes became diabetes with growing numbers so I worked harder on my diet and can reach almost normal numbers every day. Remember, I had low blood sugar and had dizzy spells and didn't know what I was doing before I surprisingly creeped into pre-diabetes some years later. I thought I cured it with eating six times a day, low carb.. I gave up baking sweets as a start and then learned much more for my current state. Everything has a cause. I am not satisfied until I find reasons for my conditions. Dorisena

Liked by trellg132

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I have thought it over, and am back to my number one reasoning. Sugar has no nutrients that are good for the body, so why eat it? It provides calories and energy to make the body run, so if you are on a desert island and hungry, with nothing to eat but deadwood, I suppose you could save your life with sugar. Not very logical if you are wanting overall good health and a well running body in your old age. When I attempted to be easy going about it all, my numbers kept creeping up and I got sleepier day by day. I couldn't work two Sudocku puzzles a day and get many chores done. I chose to get tougher on the diet and the numbers went down without as much exercise as I would like due to the bad back. I am winning the war on diabetes. I really don't want the risk of continuing to have the disease at a higher level if I can do something about it. And I don't need insulin. Perhaps my lazy insulin or my mitochondria will get busy and haul more sugar to my wasting muscles where it needs to be instead of turning into fat in my middle so I can't get into a decent looking dress. If that doesn't happen before my funeral, I have instructed my daughter to split my favorite lace dress in the back and drape it on me in the casket.
I am not being funny here, I really said that. One in a while I will cheat and make homemade ice cream with lots of fat. Slows down the spike, you know.
Then I come to my senses and get back on the program. It works well for me. Dorisena

Liked by trishanna

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@dorisena

Of course, a person's blood sugar will spike after eating a high carb meal. But a person doesn't have to choose to have that happen as it could cause damage in the long term. My cousin was advised to not allow her blood sugar to go beyond 160 or 180. A nurse at a heart clinic advised me that any blood sugar over 200 on a regular basis is a cause for concern. My late husband would not test and laughed at his occasional numbers and high blood pressure. He wanted to show how tough he was. If you want to keep your diabetes at its current level and keep your insulin shots, then you can do that. Type two diabetics can do much better than "control" and in some cases can get back to normal blood sugar levels. Over time, my pre-diabetes became diabetes with growing numbers so I worked harder on my diet and can reach almost normal numbers every day. Remember, I had low blood sugar and had dizzy spells and didn't know what I was doing before I surprisingly creeped into pre-diabetes some years later. I thought I cured it with eating six times a day, low carb.. I gave up baking sweets as a start and then learned much more for my current state. Everything has a cause. I am not satisfied until I find reasons for my conditions. Dorisena

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I went to eye doctor about my eye sight changing they seen no problems said it can come from my sugar coming down because my glasses are to strong now.my numbers are still up there but there are getting lower but it seems everthing I eat raises my number specialist my doctor referred me to isn't taking new patients

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Yes, everything we eat can change the numbers. Also the numbers follow a pattern of going up for two hours after eating, and then dropping, and then slowly rising again and then up and down in a cycle. Keeping them from going too high means changing what you eat in addition to taking insulin shots if needed.
You can get lower numbers by modifying your eating and exercising more. Why wait? You need to find out what is considered too high for your situation and even that can change as you age. The insulin shot only changes things for a few hours. It is not the whole story. I am glad your eyes are doing well now.
Several of our readers complain that the numbers keep rising over time despite the pills and shots. Diet helps in the program to bring blood sugar numbers down to more normal levels. I hope this helps your understanding of the job at hand for better health. Dorisena

Liked by trellg132

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I've been looking into trying to see what to eat what not exercising once I'm able to get with a doctor I think like you said to find a target level with more understanding I should have better results I'm thinking

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Good idea. I don't worry about a target level because the normal target level is 100 on the blood sugar and the closer I can get to that, the better I feel.
I don't know that there is a specific high target level and it is reasonable that it would vary for different people. A diabetic coma is a frightening thing, as is a stroke. Even a TIA or bloody eyes that my mother had is scary to me. Also we would like to keep our blood pressure at a "normal" level. That's hard to do sometimes. I am working on it and the numbers are going down. Dorisena

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