Anyone with occasional Afib NOT on a blood thinner?

Posted by yorlik @yorlik, Nov 8, 2020

Seems a gray area exists between constant Afib and no Afib: What about those with occasional Afib?

1) A couple of hours long, once every 3 months?
2) A couple days long, once every 3 months?

I am curious how folks with occasional Afib handle the blood thinner question? Personally, I talked my cardiologist (replacement cow valve) 2 years ago into letting me stop blood thinners due to going almost a year w/o an Afib episode, the ridiculously high cost, and my woodshop/powerTools/chainsaw/woodCutting/mechanical lifestyle.

Along same lines, anyone know of natural blood thinners that could be used for occasional episodes?

I'm very interested in your question, though my occasional Afib has a very different profile. I have short Afib, not necessarily even every day, though it's been going on awhile. Symptoms are much less noticeable than what I get with my (15%/ half trisomy) PVCs and my weird form of angina, so mostly I wouldn't even notice it. I can only be pretty sure when it's happening by checking on my Kardia when I'm feeling particularly "weird". The Afib was picked up on an echo cardiogram done in the ER recently and I'm scheduled to see an electrophysiologist in about two weeks. I already take Plavix and really don't want to go on a blood thinner.

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So @yorlik, should the gray area be divided to display other Afib profiles? For example, I have consciously asymptomatic Afib — no sensual recognition of the arrhythmia that shows up on every electrocardiograph (EKG). I'm a member of a troubling subgroup — troubling because I am medicated with daily doses of an anticoagulant (Warfarin), but nevertheless experienced a "small stroke" a new months ago. I was out for a walk, had no warning from my pulse, and lost control of a leg and fell to the ground. After about 10 minutes, I rose and stumbled two short blocks to my home and called my HMO, who sent me to an advanced clinic for an MRI that confirmed the stroke. I should have called 911, will always do so in the future, and constantly urge friends and others who ask that 911 should be the first recourse. Call it. Get first in line at the Emergency Room. Martin

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@predictable– Martin, I wholeheartedly agree with your recommendation about dialing 911. I believe that we tend too often to think were making a big fuss or minimizing our condition. It could cost us our life. I know for me that was my biggest mistake. Even though I knew (strongly felt) I was having a HA, there was that part of me saying it's only a 20 minute drive up to our ER and they will probably tell me its nothing. When I arrived at the ER they ushered me into the business office to hit me up with forms to fill out, questions being asked. I finally in tears because of the extreme pain I felt had to say Ma'am, I am having a HA! Can I please see a Dr. right away! I would have had all my vitals taken, possibly an EKG all done in the ambulance before I even arrived.
This is very valuable time when facing these occurrences in our lives. Don't hesitate ever to call 911!
Thanks Martin for your always down to earth wisdom! Jim @thankful

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Martin, are you now on a blood thinner? Your urging to9 call 911 is a great comment!

I too had a TIA – before my atrial valve replacement. Right arm went totally numb, speech totally sleared. I tried to get up out of my office chair but could not – one leg did not work. 5 minutes later, back to normal. Scary for sure.

Anyway, Martin, are you now on a blood thinner?

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Yes, @yorlik. I have been on Warfarin anticoagulant since my Afib diagnosis in 2013. I prefer that medication because of my experience in using it and because an antidote is readily available. This second factor is important to me; my friend (also on Warfarin) fell and hit his head. I found him unconscious on his garage floor, called 911, and watched him rushed away to a nearby hospital. Unfortunately, the emergency room there had no antidote on hand, so they called for a helicopter to take him to a regional hospital. He died before the antidote could be administered. As a result, my first question when I enter a clinic, emergency room, or hospital is, "Do you have vitamin K antidote for Warfarin on hand?" Martin

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I Had 2 ablations. Second successful for 16 years, Had a stroke on the golf course 2 years ago due to blood clot to brain. Fine and no AFIB episodes since but Doctor says I need to to stay on warfarin. It does not agree with me but he won't agree to aspirin. Anyone have similiar experience and off warfarin with no problems?

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@jmac23

I Had 2 ablations. Second successful for 16 years, Had a stroke on the golf course 2 years ago due to blood clot to brain. Fine and no AFIB episodes since but Doctor says I need to to stay on warfarin. It does not agree with me but he won't agree to aspirin. Anyone have similiar experience and off warfarin with no problems?

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Ask the doctor about Eliquis; It's a blood thinner that typically does not require getting blood tested ? times weekly. It may cost more than other options depending on your insurance. Good Luck !

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@jmac23

I Had 2 ablations. Second successful for 16 years, Had a stroke on the golf course 2 years ago due to blood clot to brain. Fine and no AFIB episodes since but Doctor says I need to to stay on warfarin. It does not agree with me but he won't agree to aspirin. Anyone have similiar experience and off warfarin with no problems?

Jump to this post

Hi @jmac23 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your post to a similar discussion so that you can connect with other members like @phillipdobrien, @predictable, @yorlik, @thankful, and @thankful2019

Do you think you need a supplement or medication if you aren't currently having symptoms?

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@amandaburnett

Hi @jmac23 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your post to a similar discussion so that you can connect with other members like @phillipdobrien, @predictable, @yorlik, @thankful, and @thankful2019

Do you think you need a supplement or medication if you aren't currently having symptoms?

Jump to this post

Since @amandaburnett fingered me as an Afib patient, I'll be glad to answer any questions or respond to any discussion in areas of my experience. That does not include ablation. My Afib is consciously asymptomatic; that is, I don't feel it at all and know it's there only when taking my blood pressure or when having an EKG during regular exams. Even so, on one isolated occasion I suffered a "small stroke" that was subsequently confirmed by MRI as probably caused by a blood clot developed in my heart by Afib. My favorite anticoagulant is Warfarin for its general availability of an antidote and its regular lab tests and assistance with managing it from a doctoral pharmacist. I turned down a switch to Eliquis which is aimed more restrictively to patients with specified symptoms and did not have an antidote approved or in stock at many clinics and hospitals (although that's changing recently). You should have a detailed discussion with your cardiac physician about anticoagulants in general and any suggested or recommended by your medical team. Martin

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@jmac23

I Had 2 ablations. Second successful for 16 years, Had a stroke on the golf course 2 years ago due to blood clot to brain. Fine and no AFIB episodes since but Doctor says I need to to stay on warfarin. It does not agree with me but he won't agree to aspirin. Anyone have similiar experience and off warfarin with no problems?

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Thanks for the reply. I switched to Eliquis from warfarin about one year ago because the testing for warfarin was becoming a hassle. While on the Eliquis I had a major nosebleed and ended up in the ER and they had to pack my nose. ENT removed the packing after 3 days but unfortunately still had a week of unexpected small bleeds. The 2nd cauterization cured it and now fine but was put back on warfarin. Boo.. Trying to get my Doctor to agree to aspirin but so far no luck.

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@predictable

Since @amandaburnett fingered me as an Afib patient, I'll be glad to answer any questions or respond to any discussion in areas of my experience. That does not include ablation. My Afib is consciously asymptomatic; that is, I don't feel it at all and know it's there only when taking my blood pressure or when having an EKG during regular exams. Even so, on one isolated occasion I suffered a "small stroke" that was subsequently confirmed by MRI as probably caused by a blood clot developed in my heart by Afib. My favorite anticoagulant is Warfarin for its general availability of an antidote and its regular lab tests and assistance with managing it from a doctoral pharmacist. I turned down a switch to Eliquis which is aimed more restrictively to patients with specified symptoms and did not have an antidote approved or in stock at many clinics and hospitals (although that's changing recently). You should have a detailed discussion with your cardiac physician about anticoagulants in general and any suggested or recommended by your medical team. Martin

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The idea that Warfarin can be monitored makes it less scary. My nosebleed and trip to the ER while using Eliquis scared the hell out of me and I refused to take it anymore.. My isolated incident had the same result and my Doctor keeps telling me it could happen again with worse results. However, I have shown sinus rhythm at all visits for 2 years and would really like to just take aspirin. Thanks for your reply and Good Luck

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@amandaburnett

Hi @jmac23 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your post to a similar discussion so that you can connect with other members like @phillipdobrien, @predictable, @yorlik, @thankful, and @thankful2019

Do you think you need a supplement or medication if you aren't currently having symptoms?

Jump to this post

Thank you for moving my post and I have connected with other members after that.. I'm thankful I found the Mayo Clinic Connect. Great idea and helpful

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