Anxiety and frustration after cardioversion after 3rd ablation

Posted by ev1 @ev1, Apr 30 3:48pm

I had my 3rd ablation in January for afib. All was great until yesterday morning when I woke up in fast afib. I was so angry which of course didn't help. I went to A& E and I was cardioverted after a few hours. All grand again. How do I stop the anxiety & frustration and of course the worry? I really don't want a 4th ablation. Could it be that I am still healing after January's ablation.?Any little pice of advice would be appreciated.

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OK, I don't think we disagree except for semantics. I don't think AFIB is a disease so much as a condition, so if you can make it go away permanently, as I hope, and it seems maybe you have, then it isn't wrong to say it is CURED. Ask you EP about the book, Dr's Day and Bunch, the authors are well known experts in the field, and yes they agree with you that "Ablations are good" Thanks,

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@tedalmon

OK, I don't think we disagree except for semantics. I don't think AFIB is a disease so much as a condition, so if you can make it go away permanently, as I hope, and it seems maybe you have, then it isn't wrong to say it is CURED. Ask you EP about the book, Dr's Day and Bunch, the authors are well known experts in the field, and yes they agree with you that "Ablations are good" Thanks,

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Ted, it is very solidly progressive. As different people will tell you, they can go a good long time between visits to a cardiologist or back to an EP. Over on afibbers.org, the admin there had five ablations between three different EPs until he finally found out about Dr. Andrea Natale in Austin. He is now almost eight years AF-free. Previously, he was back in AF within a few months to a year. Other frequent posters there have gone several years, but they've all agreed that eventually they had to undergo yet another ablation because they began to get fibrillation again. It is an incurable disorder/disease (it is called both), but like some other conditions, it can be controlled well with proper care from a care provider and the patient, him/herself.

This site says, "…almost always progressive…" https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/atrial-fibrillation/afib-gets-worse
This citation says '..chronic and progressive…' : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33516398/
Scroll about 1/3 of the way down this page to where in bold it asks about AF going away:
https://drafib.com/blog/what-is-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation
Yet another 'almost always': https://health.clevelandclinic.org/atrial-fibrillation-dispelling-6-myths/

It is always the case that there are 'outliers' who beat the odds. Perhaps one out of 10-to-15 persons diagnosed with AF will need little or no treatment over many years. But the very heavy majority will need it strictly managed, and even then there will come a day when things change and they'll need another tool in their pocket to deal with it.

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Obviously you are well studied on AFIB, so I won't argue that you are wrong, but the point of the book is that AFIB is caused by certain lifestyle choices we make and those can be corrected with a concerted effort, good medical advice/guidance, and the intervention of an effective ablation. The book is quite clear that an ablation alone won't permanently cure AFIB if the patient persists in the behavior that caused it in the first place. So yes, I agree with you that most cases recur, but the very fact that some don't should indicate that AFIB can be cured.

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