Afib and breathing

Posted by elegantgem @elegantgem, Mar 27 9:22am

I have afib now for 3 years. I am female and 73 years old. About a year ago I had a heart ablation and it has improved my condition but I still have episodes about 2 times a month sometimes more. I also have difficulty sleeping and always have although I never pursued any medical advice on this condition. I exercise regularly and have a personal trainer also. She is the one who noticed many times when I exercise I stop breathing. I do know I do this but don't know why or when it started. So after a lot of reading I have read that afib can occur because of breathing issues. So my question is do you think it would be worthwhile to pursue this for my afib. I don't want to go thru tests and expense just to be told I have a slight problem somewhere in my nose. If that happens it is ok but I would like to know if this is really something that can trigger afib. How do you find out about this condition what type of doctor should I talk to? Thanks in advance.

Dear Gem,
Having "episodes" is an interesting comment; apparently you can feel the AFIB. Normally, I believe< AFIB is constant requiring medication such as a blood thinner to prevent blood clots.
Stopping breathing is common with sleep apnea, unusual while exercising or soon thereafter.
I suggest that you first stop is a review of your symptoms with your cardiologist, nest your PCP, and then onto an ENT.
If the AFIB has caused heart failure, your breathing could be impacted by your lungs filling up. You would be sufferings from shortness of breath and oxygen insufficiency.
AFIB cause a loss of 30% of the heart output.
If sinus arrhythmia occurs with sinus bradycardia or tachycardia, you might experience some complications from the combination. For slow heartbeats, you may experience dizziness, shortness of breath, and fainting. Heart palpitations, lightheadedness, and chest pains can occur with irregular fast heartbeats.

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Hello, I was just diagnosed with afib, I also have other issues, panic attacks, sinus, high blood pressure, arthritis, but reading the post of "elegant gem" also said it was noticed stopped breathing but how, and also reading the answer of "spudmato" said something about sleep apnea, it did happen to many years I am now 66 yrs old, I was in my forties and I had panic attacks that's when it happens, what to expect with having afib, i am on blood thinner right now, i have a prescription of a blood test to do, I read so much on google about afib it's scary. ty

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@fde11

Hello, I was just diagnosed with afib, I also have other issues, panic attacks, sinus, high blood pressure, arthritis, but reading the post of "elegant gem" also said it was noticed stopped breathing but how, and also reading the answer of "spudmato" said something about sleep apnea, it did happen to many years I am now 66 yrs old, I was in my forties and I had panic attacks that's when it happens, what to expect with having afib, i am on blood thinner right now, i have a prescription of a blood test to do, I read so much on google about afib it's scary. ty

Jump to this post

@fde11, I'm tagging @elegantgem and @spudmato to make sure that they see your post and mentions of them.

A-Fib, like any new diagnosis, can be scary. However, as they say, knowledge is power. The more you know about YOUR a-fib (not everyone is the same), the better you will be able to live well with the condition, recognize the warning signs and live healthy to help prevent any complications. Mayo Clinic suggest these prevention tips:
– Eating a heart-healthy diet
– Increasing your physical activity
– Avoiding smoking
– Maintaining a healthy weight
– Limiting or avoiding caffeine and alcohol
– Reducing stress, as intense stress and anger can cause heart rhythm problems
– Using over-the-counter medications with caution, as some cold and cough medications contain stimulants that may trigger a rapid heartbeat

Do you have sleep apnea? What lifestyle changes might help you?

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@colleenyoung

@fde11, I'm tagging @elegantgem and @spudmato to make sure that they see your post and mentions of them.

A-Fib, like any new diagnosis, can be scary. However, as they say, knowledge is power. The more you know about YOUR a-fib (not everyone is the same), the better you will be able to live well with the condition, recognize the warning signs and live healthy to help prevent any complications. Mayo Clinic suggest these prevention tips:
– Eating a heart-healthy diet
– Increasing your physical activity
– Avoiding smoking
– Maintaining a healthy weight
– Limiting or avoiding caffeine and alcohol
– Reducing stress, as intense stress and anger can cause heart rhythm problems
– Using over-the-counter medications with caution, as some cold and cough medications contain stimulants that may trigger a rapid heartbeat

Do you have sleep apnea? What lifestyle changes might help you?

Jump to this post

TY Colleen, exercise, lose some weight and sleep apnea I only had it twice when I first had panic attacks thank god, it's not an easy thing to go through, very scary.

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I also am on Eliquis but I don't think having afib means you will have a stroke. Does it? Do you know what percentage of people who have afib go on to have a stroke? I do everything Colleen suggests with my only issue being stress. By asking this type of question I know a lot of my issue is not getting enough oxgyen in my body at times. However, I don't read doctors telling people to rent oxgyen. I know I have sleep apnea but have never pursured it. I was wondering if this is something people pursue to help with afib?

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