Why Genetic Testing for Mental Health Meds is Important

Posted by ainsleigh @ainsleigh, Mon, Feb 11 6:32pm

@ainsleigh– Recently we learned that my 19 year old Grandson (who has been diagnosed with depression, panic attacks and anxiety) has not been
on the right medication. In fact the one he has been on was in the red (wrong) zone as opposed to green or yellow. Needless-to-say he is tapering off it in preparation to be put on one in the green zone! We did learn this through the Genetic Testing. If you are able to access this testing I would really recommend it!
Best wishes
Ainsleigh

@ainsleigh – Good morning @ainsleigh. Would you mind explaining what the test is and what the colors and zones mean? Thank you.

@merpreb– Hi Merry- This test was done through CAMH in Toronto and is called the Impact Study but I believe this testing is done in many places.
The purpose is to determine through genetic testing which psychotropic medications are most helpful (or not) with mental health problems. The green as I called it means it is ok to use as directed. The yellow means to use with caution. The red means to use with increased caution and with more frequent monitoring. Think of traffic lights- green is go-yellow is caution and red is stop. My Grandson was on the only one that came up in the "red" category.
I believe the test looks at how a person's liver metabolizes the drugs I hope this is helpful.
Best wishes
Ainsleigh

@ainsleigh– Hi! Great information. I didn't know that this tests was available. It would save a lot of time vs being a guinea pig, trying different meds. Thank you

@merpreb– You are welcome Merry. It was from another member of our Connect group that I was fortunate to learn about the genetic testing so I am very grateful as it did enable us to get my Grandson tested. If you google Mayo Clinic genetic testing it tells the various ways it is being used. To me it seems like a wonderful tool for those struggling with mental health issues.
Best wishes
Ainsleigh

Hi, I'm new to this board and am wondering if any of you have had success with genetic testing for depression? My PA doesn't recommend it – says it's too expensive and test results can limit what insurance companies will cover. Would appreciate your feedback.
I've been on Effexor for 25 years and am in the process of weaning myself off. I HATE Effexor!!! I've tried to get off of it in the past and ended up going back on it due to the side effects. I've been on 75 MG for years. I've gone to 37.50 for the past 7 days and now and taking the 37.50 every other day for 7 days. On the 15th day I'll start on Lexapro. Have any of you had success with Lexapro? Thanks for any advice you can give me.

Hi @cookie6845– In the case of my Grandson it was done through CAMH in Toronto (Impact Study) and was free. It showed he was on the wrong med. and as a result is now on a correct one for him so it was well worthwhile and he seems to be doing well.
Best wishes
Ainsleigh

We used a service called Genomind. It was hugely helpful for our daughter. It basically looks at the person’s chemical makeup and while it won’t tell you which meds will work best, it WILL tell you which meds are likely to be negative. It’s shocking that doctors are not required to do this testing before putting people on drugs. It’s a quick saliva swap and you get a great printout with details. Highly recommend it

hi mpm1- We used CAMH (Canadian Association for Mental Health). Their Impact Study re genes and medications was free.( If some places charge
insurance plans may cover the cost.) It did tell which meds would work best as well as if it could be negative.
Ainsleigh

Please login or register to post a reply.