What is the benefit of a Neuropsychological testing?

Posted by DanL @tunared, Mar 8 9:20pm

my wife has an upcoming Neuropsychological test and is very nervous (and very anxious) about the test. She (and I) would like to know what is the benefit to her for taking this type of test? She knows her memory is not what it was 5-10 years ago and doesn't understand why she should take the test. She thinks they are using her as a guinea pig with this type of test. I cannot provide her with any benefits that would come from taking the test. Can anyone help?

@fwentz

I loved your comment "I just keep reminding myself of how grateful I am …." My wife is in the late stage of Alzheimer's Disease and I love her more than ever just the way she is. I put a note on her mirror "How great is God's goodness to have given you to me to love for a lifetime!"

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This is lovely.

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@fwentz

I loved your comment "I just keep reminding myself of how grateful I am …." My wife is in the late stage of Alzheimer's Disease and I love her more than ever just the way she is. I put a note on her mirror "How great is God's goodness to have given you to me to love for a lifetime!"

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"How great is God's goodness…on her mirror! What a sweet thought….I am going to "mirror" you and do the same thing! As an added thought, my mom had the following saying engraved inside my dad's wedding band: "I love you twice as much today as I did yesterday and only 1/2 as much as tomorrow." I never knew how that was written on the inside of his band but a true jeweler must have been quite skilled. She always put "2x- 1/2" on anything she ever wrote to him. She died 2 years ago and dad (age 94) still wears the ring that has only been taken off for surgeries. (Please forgive this melancholic moment -but all of us need these little tidbits to remind us of how fortunate we are even on the difficult days. )

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@teacher502

My husband has been through the neuro-psyche testing at least three times. He dreads it for days before it actually happens. I try to help him with the anxiety and try to provide some coping skills (this is not a test to enter college- just enjoy the time you are with the testers, etc ). He did tell them he would like to skip the math portion from now on and that was fine with them and with me. As his caregiver and as a former teacher, the testing is very beneficial to me. It does help with getting a handle on the progression of the disease and takes away some guesswork of the pace of decline. It helps to find things he can do well as it identifies areas of strength and helps me to capitalize on them. It also provides ideas of how to help him cope as some skills become weaker….and it helps me to try to be more patient and compassionate…some days are easier than others. I just keep reminding myself of how grateful I am to have had the once in a lifetime opportunity to be a part of this amazing man's life. He has taken very good care of our family, and I treasure this time to be his help mate through this part of our journey.

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Hello @teacher502 and @larryh123, my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease about two years ago, after an MRI and a day of neuropsychological testing. It was gruelling for him, but useful at the time, as it confirmed the diagnosis, which I wanted to deny. His disease is progressing slowly and his memory comes and goes. Yesterday he knew who the people I was talking about were, whereas he did not know who they were the day before. He stopped driving without a fight and has stepped down from managing our finances. In our current situation, I don't think more neuropsychological testing would be beneficial. It would involve a flight to another island, take two days, and upset him. He does have a low tolerance for doing difficult things and changes in routine upset him. He still functions well around the house, helps me with chores when I ask, and overall, has a pleasant disposition.

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