Share this:
lisabeans
@lisabeans

Posts: 85
Joined: Feb 13, 2017

Vertigo

Posted by @lisabeans, Apr 18, 2017

Hope all is well with everyone. I just finished testing with my primary and I do have vertigo. She said therapy may help relieve the dizziness. I do have pills to take to help some of the dizziness. Just wondering if this is common with people who have autoimmune diseases? Has any one done physical therapy for vertigo? Did you get good results?

REPLY

Hello @lisabeans, I have a couple of autoimmune diseases but have not had vertigo. I did find some information on the Mayo Clinic website that discusses physical therapy as a treatment that might give you a little information – http://mayocl.in/2pe84T2

John

@johnbishop

Hello @lisabeans, I have a couple of autoimmune diseases but have not had vertigo. I did find some information on the Mayo Clinic website that discusses physical therapy as a treatment that might give you a little information – http://mayocl.in/2pe84T2

John

Jump to this post

Thank you John. My husband’s aunt also has this vertigo but has been unsuccessful with therapy. I am hoping my therapy works!

@johnbishop

Hello @lisabeans, I have a couple of autoimmune diseases but have not had vertigo. I did find some information on the Mayo Clinic website that discusses physical therapy as a treatment that might give you a little information – http://mayocl.in/2pe84T2

John

Jump to this post

I hope the physical therapy works for you. I know treatments can be different for each of us and may or may not work. If you want to do some in depth reading, I did a search on “vertigo physical therapy” on Google scholar – https://scholar.google.com/ and came up with a lot of information. Here are the search results – http://bit.ly/2nZSx9f. You can also refine by using the links on the left to show by dates and more. You might be able to do a search there with different keywords and find some information more relevant.

Good luck!
John

I was just diagnosed with vertigo 3 months ago and yes I have an autoimmune disease. My doctor said they will come and go and gave me some meds to help during an episode. I’ve only had the one so far so not much I can tell you. Hope yours gets better quickly.

@angels4everyone

Has anyone ever heard of a pinched nerve causing vertigo?

Jump to this post

I would love to know this as well. I have intermittent pinching in my cervical vertebra, and have been in acute pain for the last 4 days. My vertigo symptoms just started (never experienced them before) and it seems possible that they are connected. Would love some information.

Has anyone ever heard of a pinched nerve causing vertigo?

@archarch

I would love to know this as well. I have intermittent pinching in my cervical vertebra, and have been in acute pain for the last 4 days. My vertigo symptoms just started (never experienced them before) and it seems possible that they are connected. Would love some information.

Jump to this post

@archarch @angels4everyone Yes, you are correct. Cervical spine problems can cause vertigo. I am a Mayo spine surgery patient and before my surgery, I had some episodes of vertigo that were touched off by the position of my head. I looked up at birds flying overhead, and became extremely dizzy and when I leveled my head, it didn't stop. My physical therapist was able to resolve it for me. It was happening because of muscle spasms (from the spine problem) that were pulling my cervical vertebrae out of alignment. It was twisting and tilting C1 & C2 causing vertigo and nausea. When I looked up with my neck in that alignment, it caused vertigo. By realigning everything again, it went away. I worked with my physical therapist a lot before my surgery to try to maintain a normal lordotic curve as best I could and we kept working on the spasms that cropped up. I also have thoracic outlet syndrome which makes one side of my neck tighter than the other which pulls harder on all the cervical vertebrae on one side of my neck. Your skull can be skewed as it sits on top of the spine or it can be jammed into the spine by muscle spasms affecting alignment (like looking upward). I'm working on that in PT and I'm 2 years past my spine surgery and there has been no more vertigo since then. A heat wrap (relaxes muscles) or topical arnica jel (pain relief and relaxes muscles) on your neck can help. I recommend working with a physical therapist. they will need to know if there is any instability before they work on you, so if you have not have imaging, that is a first step. If you haven't seen a spine specialist, I would recommend it. You might be OK with physical therapy which they could write a script for. If you do end up headed for spine surgery, always get several opinions so you can make informed choices. I came to Mayo when 5 spine surgeons missed connecting my symptoms with the diagnosis and I am glad I did. It makes me wish I had started here instead of wasting 2 years looking for help from surgeons who refused to help me. Mayo doctors get things figured out quickly because it's a team approach, and I had an offer for surgical help in 2 days after coming to Mayo. I had a great recovery and I don't have any spine related pain.

@jenniferhunter I just read through several of your responses to others regarding cervical vertebrae/spinal stenosis/vertigo/muscle spasms/surgery etc. and it sounded like what I'm living with! My surgeon says my moderate to severe stenosis isn't at surgery level STILL. In the past several months, I've lost my balance multiple times and sometimes it doesn't come back. One night I just went to bed because it was that bad. I've told several doctors. (I'm new and haven't created my profile yet.) None of my doctors have been phased by my vertigo report. Getting doctors to react and act in this area is an issue. My doctors are to do what's going to be healthy to keep me moving so I can resume a very physically active life. Recently, I started taking supplements that brought energy back so that I am not sleeping my days away, Fibro. After two years of no energy, this is thrilling. Two are Young Living supplements and the third is a Methylfolate supplement (I have a genetic mutation where I don't retain B-12 and Folic Acid). I'd tried so many products that people thought would work. I'd already been told that I need to take the one due to B-12/Folic Acid issue; the two descriptions of other 2 hit me as what I needed, tried, and wow!
Reading your post was very informative! There giving me things to think on, possibly act on, such as other surgeon opinions!
Me: have multiple auto-immune, chronic pain from L4-L5 Lumbar replacement w/pins and rods in place, Osteoporosis, osteo-arthritis, Migraines, TMJ and an allergy to mouth guards, bone spurs, tendonitis, muscle spasms, allergies including many food, and more. 😉

@lisabeans I didn't know that Vertigo was possibly linked to Auto-immune diseases! I have several and have been having a rough time with Vertigo for the past 4-5 months. In thought it would be more related to my Cervical stenosis and muscle spasms. What testing did they do?

@gldnrtrvrlvr

@jenniferhunter I just read through several of your responses to others regarding cervical vertebrae/spinal stenosis/vertigo/muscle spasms/surgery etc. and it sounded like what I'm living with! My surgeon says my moderate to severe stenosis isn't at surgery level STILL. In the past several months, I've lost my balance multiple times and sometimes it doesn't come back. One night I just went to bed because it was that bad. I've told several doctors. (I'm new and haven't created my profile yet.) None of my doctors have been phased by my vertigo report. Getting doctors to react and act in this area is an issue. My doctors are to do what's going to be healthy to keep me moving so I can resume a very physically active life. Recently, I started taking supplements that brought energy back so that I am not sleeping my days away, Fibro. After two years of no energy, this is thrilling. Two are Young Living supplements and the third is a Methylfolate supplement (I have a genetic mutation where I don't retain B-12 and Folic Acid). I'd tried so many products that people thought would work. I'd already been told that I need to take the one due to B-12/Folic Acid issue; the two descriptions of other 2 hit me as what I needed, tried, and wow!
Reading your post was very informative! There giving me things to think on, possibly act on, such as other surgeon opinions!
Me: have multiple auto-immune, chronic pain from L4-L5 Lumbar replacement w/pins and rods in place, Osteoporosis, osteo-arthritis, Migraines, TMJ and an allergy to mouth guards, bone spurs, tendonitis, muscle spasms, allergies including many food, and more. 😉

Jump to this post

@gldnrtrvrlvr Thank you for your comments. I would encourage you to get another surgical opinion if you have severe stenosis. They might be looking for spinal cord damage that happens when the blood supply to the spinal cord is cut off by pressure, and tissue starts to die to show a white area on the spinal cord imaging. That becomes permanent damage. I didn't have any myelopathy visible on my MRIs, but my Mayo surgeon said it doesn't always show on the MRI. It was when I told surgeon #5 about the vertigo, that he dismissed me. I think that opens up a can of worms that could be more serious issues. I've read my Mayo surgeon's papers where he talks about vertigo with cervical spine issues, but I was really afraid to talk too much about it, so I focused more on the muscle spasms. If no one has talked to you about addressing the stenosis, you might want to consider Mayo Clinic. It's a different world there where every doctor there is focused around solving your issues as best they can and you'll be referred to other departments. I don't think most doctors like to hear about fibro either because they want good surgical outcomes, and if a patient has fibro, they may continue to have pain after spine surgery and blame the surgeon. Fibro becomes a catch all diagnosis when they can't identify the source of pain. I was told that long ago, but after I resolved my food allergies, I wasn't in pain anymore. Pain can also be from the fascia if it doesn't move properly, and myofascial release can help that which will also release the waste products that are stored there in the dehydrated tissues.

Your surgeon might be more focused on lumbar issues. My Mayo neurosurgeon is a spinal deformity expert, and teaches cervical surgeries, also has a spine orthopedic fellowship, and does both fusion and disc replacement. I'll be happy to share his information with you if you wish. I'm an artist who was loosing the ability to do my artwork, and my surgeon gave that back to me. In gratitude, I painted his portrait as a gift to him when I was recovered enough to do it. If I ever need spine surgery again, I'm coming back to him at Mayo. I think highly of him as a kind person outside of his profession.

I would recommend optimizing your vitamin D to help the osteoporosis. I take Vitamin K2 D3 from Orthomolecular on the advice of my functional medicine doctor. I think Mayo would be a good place to go regarding your vitamin B genetic issues in case they have something that could help. Migraines and TMJ can also be caused (or made worse) my muscle spasms from a cervical spine problem. Working with a physical therapist helped me a lot during the years when no surgeon would help me, and she would realign my spine the best she could and block pain with some neurostimulation ( Dolphin Neurostimulators).

You do have to advocate for yourself. Don't just wait because your surgeon thinks you're not bad enough for surgery if you don't agree. I think loosing your balance is a problem. I actually fell over like a tree and could not stop myself even though I had my hand on my porch railing. I called my physical therapist a few times and she had shown me things to do in the office. One one occasion, I had fixed about 90% of a vertigo problem myself before I got to my PT appointment. I've been in physical therapy about 4 years treating the thoracic outlet syndrome and I have learned a lot in doing so, and during that time, I developed stenosis after the disc ruptured and bone spurs grew. I had to push for MRIs when doctors kept wanting to wait a year between them, and I saw the bone spurs double in size in 9 months time. My biology background helps me to understand MRIs. Again, thanks for your comments. I'm glad I could help. Let me know if you have other questions.

@jenniferhunter

@gldnrtrvrlvr Thank you for your comments. I would encourage you to get another surgical opinion if you have severe stenosis. They might be looking for spinal cord damage that happens when the blood supply to the spinal cord is cut off by pressure, and tissue starts to die to show a white area on the spinal cord imaging. That becomes permanent damage. I didn't have any myelopathy visible on my MRIs, but my Mayo surgeon said it doesn't always show on the MRI. It was when I told surgeon #5 about the vertigo, that he dismissed me. I think that opens up a can of worms that could be more serious issues. I've read my Mayo surgeon's papers where he talks about vertigo with cervical spine issues, but I was really afraid to talk too much about it, so I focused more on the muscle spasms. If no one has talked to you about addressing the stenosis, you might want to consider Mayo Clinic. It's a different world there where every doctor there is focused around solving your issues as best they can and you'll be referred to other departments. I don't think most doctors like to hear about fibro either because they want good surgical outcomes, and if a patient has fibro, they may continue to have pain after spine surgery and blame the surgeon. Fibro becomes a catch all diagnosis when they can't identify the source of pain. I was told that long ago, but after I resolved my food allergies, I wasn't in pain anymore. Pain can also be from the fascia if it doesn't move properly, and myofascial release can help that which will also release the waste products that are stored there in the dehydrated tissues.

Your surgeon might be more focused on lumbar issues. My Mayo neurosurgeon is a spinal deformity expert, and teaches cervical surgeries, also has a spine orthopedic fellowship, and does both fusion and disc replacement. I'll be happy to share his information with you if you wish. I'm an artist who was loosing the ability to do my artwork, and my surgeon gave that back to me. In gratitude, I painted his portrait as a gift to him when I was recovered enough to do it. If I ever need spine surgery again, I'm coming back to him at Mayo. I think highly of him as a kind person outside of his profession.

I would recommend optimizing your vitamin D to help the osteoporosis. I take Vitamin K2 D3 from Orthomolecular on the advice of my functional medicine doctor. I think Mayo would be a good place to go regarding your vitamin B genetic issues in case they have something that could help. Migraines and TMJ can also be caused (or made worse) my muscle spasms from a cervical spine problem. Working with a physical therapist helped me a lot during the years when no surgeon would help me, and she would realign my spine the best she could and block pain with some neurostimulation ( Dolphin Neurostimulators).

You do have to advocate for yourself. Don't just wait because your surgeon thinks you're not bad enough for surgery if you don't agree. I think loosing your balance is a problem. I actually fell over like a tree and could not stop myself even though I had my hand on my porch railing. I called my physical therapist a few times and she had shown me things to do in the office. One one occasion, I had fixed about 90% of a vertigo problem myself before I got to my PT appointment. I've been in physical therapy about 4 years treating the thoracic outlet syndrome and I have learned a lot in doing so, and during that time, I developed stenosis after the disc ruptured and bone spurs grew. I had to push for MRIs when doctors kept wanting to wait a year between them, and I saw the bone spurs double in size in 9 months time. My biology background helps me to understand MRIs. Again, thanks for your comments. I'm glad I could help. Let me know if you have other questions.

Jump to this post

Amen to Mayo being a "DIFFERENT WORLD"! And absolutely you need to advocate for yourself. Read as much as you can without going down a rabbit hole. Medicine is an esoteric language that you need to familiarize yourself. Talk the talk and get your doctors to walk the walk. If there is something to avoid discussing, I would also suggest pulling out any diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The prejudice you because of it. That is not right, but so very true. Stick with the facts of the symptoms, and it sounds like leaving out vertigo, which could be one of those hot buttons that you avoid as well. Good luck to you, and I hope you find what you seeking to alleviate your symptoms. God bless, and hopefully you can make it to Mayo Rochester. Buckle up, because you have NEVER seen medicine performed quite like this. You are put through the gambit of testing by, well simply the best doctors in the world. And lastly, everyone at Mayo is "NICE"! Yes, even the doctors!!!! Unbelievable experience when your health goes sideways. Thank you for all that you do Mayo Clinic!!! Sean L. Roop

I am not sure if my vertigo is related to the autoimmune diseases. My doctor gave me a dizzy test in the office to diagnosis. Man did that make me feel sick. I take mecklazine when it is bad. Therapy did help lesson the dizziness. She said it is an autoimmune disease of the inner ear. I am just guessing that it is related but have no scientific evidence.

@jenniferhunter

@archarch @angels4everyone Yes, you are correct. Cervical spine problems can cause vertigo. I am a Mayo spine surgery patient and before my surgery, I had some episodes of vertigo that were touched off by the position of my head. I looked up at birds flying overhead, and became extremely dizzy and when I leveled my head, it didn't stop. My physical therapist was able to resolve it for me. It was happening because of muscle spasms (from the spine problem) that were pulling my cervical vertebrae out of alignment. It was twisting and tilting C1 & C2 causing vertigo and nausea. When I looked up with my neck in that alignment, it caused vertigo. By realigning everything again, it went away. I worked with my physical therapist a lot before my surgery to try to maintain a normal lordotic curve as best I could and we kept working on the spasms that cropped up. I also have thoracic outlet syndrome which makes one side of my neck tighter than the other which pulls harder on all the cervical vertebrae on one side of my neck. Your skull can be skewed as it sits on top of the spine or it can be jammed into the spine by muscle spasms affecting alignment (like looking upward). I'm working on that in PT and I'm 2 years past my spine surgery and there has been no more vertigo since then. A heat wrap (relaxes muscles) or topical arnica jel (pain relief and relaxes muscles) on your neck can help. I recommend working with a physical therapist. they will need to know if there is any instability before they work on you, so if you have not have imaging, that is a first step. If you haven't seen a spine specialist, I would recommend it. You might be OK with physical therapy which they could write a script for. If you do end up headed for spine surgery, always get several opinions so you can make informed choices. I came to Mayo when 5 spine surgeons missed connecting my symptoms with the diagnosis and I am glad I did. It makes me wish I had started here instead of wasting 2 years looking for help from surgeons who refused to help me. Mayo doctors get things figured out quickly because it's a team approach, and I had an offer for surgical help in 2 days after coming to Mayo. I had a great recovery and I don't have any spine related pain.

Jump to this post

Thanks @jenniferhunter–great information all around. I'm self-diagnosed at this point, but this describes my experience exactly. Cheers!

Liked by Jennifer Hunter

Vertigo was one of the first things I had to face. It was downhill from there. I was diagnosed at Scripps in San Diego. What a miserable disease. From there I went to what they called Fibermyalgia. Then Rheumatoid Arthritis. I was still working full time and dealing with all of this. Now I am retired and I am treated for Rheumatoid Arthritis. I saw doctors at the University in Texas for over a year. Now relocated to Idaho and in a small town I don't have the resources of a big city. But, the doctor I saw today, shocked me to my senses. He said, we can treat the pain which will never be totally gone. We can start therapy, but Lee, you must realize that your bodies parts are all sick. We can do all we can do to help you. I can never promise you that you will be free of pain. I won't go into the other "thing" that are wrong with me. Some are body breaking down. Many could be from all the meds I have had to take over the years. I have fallen 4 times and broken bones. I have concrete in my back. You could see me walking down the street and not think anything i wrong with me. I carry my head high and I fight this horrible disease which has taken over my body. I hate Rheumatoid Arthritis, but it is not going away. So, I must get over it and live.

Liked by gldnrtrvrlvr

@oregongirl

Vertigo was one of the first things I had to face. It was downhill from there. I was diagnosed at Scripps in San Diego. What a miserable disease. From there I went to what they called Fibermyalgia. Then Rheumatoid Arthritis. I was still working full time and dealing with all of this. Now I am retired and I am treated for Rheumatoid Arthritis. I saw doctors at the University in Texas for over a year. Now relocated to Idaho and in a small town I don't have the resources of a big city. But, the doctor I saw today, shocked me to my senses. He said, we can treat the pain which will never be totally gone. We can start therapy, but Lee, you must realize that your bodies parts are all sick. We can do all we can do to help you. I can never promise you that you will be free of pain. I won't go into the other "thing" that are wrong with me. Some are body breaking down. Many could be from all the meds I have had to take over the years. I have fallen 4 times and broken bones. I have concrete in my back. You could see me walking down the street and not think anything i wrong with me. I carry my head high and I fight this horrible disease which has taken over my body. I hate Rheumatoid Arthritis, but it is not going away. So, I must get over it and live.

Jump to this post

@oregongirl I've been told the same. I'm not going to stop living over it as I still have too many plans! Stupid body throws it's curves like tonight I was going to turn off the gas grill propane tank and attempted to bend my right knee, and down I went with a loud cry. A tendon connecting my knee and femur was at fault. Now there's a small pocket of fluid now on the outside of my my knee. My left knee feels stiff so there's some issue affecting both knees. My Shoulder Orthopedist has decided that there's no more to be done after his follow-up exam on Thursday – I'm now weaker which makes no sense. My cervical injection is having limited success and not enough at that. See the surgeon Monday. I'll see what he has to say. I've asked for a referral from another doctor for a second opinion. I don't live near a Mayo Hospital.😟 Got to get some sleep. Hope this makes sense!

Please login or register to post a reply.