Unable to understand this part of medical report

Posted by mpeters @mpeters, Mar 23, 2017

What does this mean: left lower sternal PMI, nondisplaced.

Hi @mpeters. Welcome to Mayo Connect. I can answer your question in part.

“Point of maximum impulse” (PMI) is the point on the precordium — farthest outwards (laterally) and downwards (inferiorly) from the sternum — at which the cardiac impulse can be felt. The cardiac impulse is the vibration resulting from the heart rotating, moving forward, and striking against the chest wall during systole (ventricular contraction). The PMI is not the apex of the heart but is on the precordium not far from it.

“Precordium” is the region of the thorax immediately in front of the heart.

These definitions are taken from the 2008 Bates guide to physical examination and history taking.

I can’t say what “nondisplaced” means in this context. You should ask your doctor next time you speak with him/her. Are you under diagnosis for an adverse medical condition?

Thank you so much for the information. I think nondisplaced means it’s in the correct location. To answer your question, I have left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Thanks again. I appreciate the fact that you took time for me.

Hello @mpeters,

I would like to add my welcome, and also thank @predictable for joining in with all the information, as always.

I did a bit of digging myself, and found that the term “non displaced” generally means that the heart is not enlarged. You may also wish to view these recent discussions about diastolic dysfunction, on Connect; feel free to tag other members, and join in the conversation:

Stiff Heart – diastolic heart failure: http://mayocl.in/2mBXGmQ
Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction – pre heart failure, preserved: http://mayocl.in/2n4G27D
Diastolic dysfunction and resulting a-fib: http://mayocl.in/2nTEukW

@mpeters, we would love to know more about your thoughts and experiences related to diastolic dysfunction, symptoms and treatments; when were you diagnosed with it?

@kanaazpereira

Hello @mpeters,

I would like to add my welcome, and also thank @predictable for joining in with all the information, as always.

I did a bit of digging myself, and found that the term “non displaced” generally means that the heart is not enlarged. You may also wish to view these recent discussions about diastolic dysfunction, on Connect; feel free to tag other members, and join in the conversation:

Stiff Heart – diastolic heart failure: http://mayocl.in/2mBXGmQ
Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction – pre heart failure, preserved: http://mayocl.in/2n4G27D
Diastolic dysfunction and resulting a-fib: http://mayocl.in/2nTEukW

@mpeters, we would love to know more about your thoughts and experiences related to diastolic dysfunction, symptoms and treatments; when were you diagnosed with it?

Jump to this post

Thank you for the information. It is much appreciated. The condition was listed in my report several years back, but my doctor never mentioned it. It was listed in successive years and from my reading it seemed worse as years went on. No doctor ever mentioned it. Ironically because I exercise a lot, I test well on treadmill tests for aerobic function. I think my only symptom is needing a lot of sleep and often taking an afternoon nap. When I turned seventy this January, my doctor mentioned “your heart disease” for the first time. He told me I could probably expect to live ten more years, “maybe even fifteen.” That gave me a jolt, because both of my parents lived into their nineties. I do a pretty good job of eating right and exercising. I just seem to tire more quickly than my age mates. And definitely sleep more. Reading the posts here, I recognize there are far worse things. And actually for me, there is. I have frequent colonoscopies due to numerous polyps and I’m at the ” very high risk” range for colon cancer.

I am 70 years old and in good shape except for what has been labelled by my GP as having an extra systole. He tells me that it’s a benign condition not requiring any treatment. The thing is that I don’t feel that the condition is all that benign. I can only describe it as feeling like a fish is swimming around in my chest and I get the occasional whack against the ribs with its tail. In other words, I am much more aware of my heart beat than I think I should be. This alone wouldn’t be so bad but it’s not just the physical thumping of the heart that’s the problem. There’s a vague sense of unease and anxiety that never seems to let up and I know that life would be so much nicer without this extra systole and the ensuing constant awareness of my heart beating. Is there any treatment for the condition?

Please login or register to post a reply.