Thyroid hormone levels crazy

Posted by arabon @arabon, Aug 30 12:42am

I know this is cancer but I don’t know where else to ask this. A couple of weeks ago, I had some sudden and sharp pain in my lower right abdomen (really not relevant). I needed to be hospitalized. I was there for 4 days and while I was in there my heart rate dropped to 50 and my blood pressure was really low. They determined that it was my thyroid, increased the dosage on my Synthroid and sent me home. I am still fainting so I went t a doctor that my psychologist recommended so that I could get some answers. He ran a lot of tests and found that my tsh levels were high and my t3 levels were also high. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol. Everything that I have read points to a tumor but my doctor wouldn’t confirm or deny anything. He wants to see me again in 3 weeks but didn’t change or do anything with this information. I am not the kid of person who can just accept no answers and so I’ve become suicidal. I really really want help. Can anyone give me any info on what this means please?

Hi @arabon, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your message to the Diabetes/Endocrine System group. I think you'll get more responses here. In fact, I'd like to invite @dawn_giacabazi @dorisena @jodyradney @mcmurf2 @retiredteacher to join this discussion with their thoughts.

You may also be interested in this discussion:
– High TSH and High T3 https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/high-tsh-and-high-t3/

I can imagine how this information has caused such a high level of anxiety and it may seem callous that the doctor couldn't tell you more, but thyroid readings are tricky. It sounds like he needs to compare your current readings to new readings in 3 weeks to continue the investigation into what is going on. This doesn't automatically mean it's cancer. It is so hard to stop your mind from going there. I've done it too.

How are you feeling today? Has the increased dose of Synthroid made a difference yet?

REPLY

Hello @arabon
Only speaking from my most recent battle with diabetes. I was diagnosed couple months ago, June 24th of this year.

Most physicians do not run to diagnose a tumor. Usually they tread lightly ruling out more common causes. So it would make more sense to start at the beginning.

Since normal thyroid function is essential to regulate energy metabolism, abnormal thyroid function may have profound effects on blood glucose control in diabetes. Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can affect the course of diabetes, but their effects are somewhat different. Hyperthyroidism is typically associated with worsening blood glucose control and increased insulin requirements. The excessive thyroid hormone causes increased glucose production in the liver, rapid absorption of glucose through the intestines, and increased insulin resistance (a condition in which the body does not use insulin efficiently). It may be important to consider underlying thyroid disorder if a person has unexplained weight loss, deterioration in blood glucose control, or increased insulin requirements. Sometimes hyperthyroidism may even unmask latent diabetes.

It would be reasonable for your physician to have you monitor your diet & blood glucose levels. Have they checked your glycated hemoglobin other wise known as hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c? Here is a link to help understand this test and it’s importance…
https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/a1c-test/about/pac-20384643
Are you monitoring your blood glucose and your tracking your daily dietary intake?

Thanks
Dawn

REPLY

This was or is my experience. I was taken to ER for a possible heart attack. At which time they found a small tumor on my thyroid that I apparently had for years and never knew it. Benign and they made light of it. I’ve lived so far 14 years since. I am always very tired and not on any meds for it. I have hypothyroidism. Very sluggish metabolism. I usually exercise lightly for about 10-15 minutes in the morning eat 3 sugar free flour free meals a day with 5 oz of cabbage soup in between breakfast and lunch and green soup which is a blended up fresh veggie soup about 7:00 pm. I’m 74 years old. I’m a compulsive over eater. But with my zoom and telephone meeting and a recovered sponsor it works as long as I work the steps. This way of life has brought me purpose and a healthy way of living. Weight and attitude has a lot to do with stress and a healthy body. I in turn sponsor to help others. Instead of feeling miserable scared and irritable, I now feel grateful, full of hope happy and encouraging. When weather gets a bit cooler I will start walking outside.

REPLY
@dawn_giacabazi

Hello @arabon
Only speaking from my most recent battle with diabetes. I was diagnosed couple months ago, June 24th of this year.

Most physicians do not run to diagnose a tumor. Usually they tread lightly ruling out more common causes. So it would make more sense to start at the beginning.

Since normal thyroid function is essential to regulate energy metabolism, abnormal thyroid function may have profound effects on blood glucose control in diabetes. Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can affect the course of diabetes, but their effects are somewhat different. Hyperthyroidism is typically associated with worsening blood glucose control and increased insulin requirements. The excessive thyroid hormone causes increased glucose production in the liver, rapid absorption of glucose through the intestines, and increased insulin resistance (a condition in which the body does not use insulin efficiently). It may be important to consider underlying thyroid disorder if a person has unexplained weight loss, deterioration in blood glucose control, or increased insulin requirements. Sometimes hyperthyroidism may even unmask latent diabetes.

It would be reasonable for your physician to have you monitor your diet & blood glucose levels. Have they checked your glycated hemoglobin other wise known as hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c? Here is a link to help understand this test and it’s importance…
https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/a1c-test/about/pac-20384643
Are you monitoring your blood glucose and your tracking your daily dietary intake?

Thanks
Dawn

Jump to this post

I have had hypothyroidism for years and before we had a handle on it I put on a lot of weight and fast. All the medication did was steady my weight. It doesn't decrease or increase. I've always been weary of diabetes because it runs in my family, my bio mother has it as well as her mother.

My doctor isn't having me watch my diet or blood glucose levels. He did check my A1C and that's when he diagnosed me with diabetes. I'm depressed and upset so I really haven't been doing anything to help my health.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi @arabon, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I moved your message to the Diabetes/Endocrine System group. I think you'll get more responses here. In fact, I'd like to invite @dawn_giacabazi @dorisena @jodyradney @mcmurf2 @retiredteacher to join this discussion with their thoughts.

You may also be interested in this discussion:
– High TSH and High T3 https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/high-tsh-and-high-t3/

I can imagine how this information has caused such a high level of anxiety and it may seem callous that the doctor couldn't tell you more, but thyroid readings are tricky. It sounds like he needs to compare your current readings to new readings in 3 weeks to continue the investigation into what is going on. This doesn't automatically mean it's cancer. It is so hard to stop your mind from going there. I've done it too.

How are you feeling today? Has the increased dose of Synthroid made a difference yet?

Jump to this post

Thank you for moving this to a better discussion board 🙂

That discussion (High TSH and High T3) is actually what made me join this website. I honestly don't believe it's cancer, I read that most pituitary tumors are benign.

I feel sluggish, irritable, suicidal (I have a psychologist and psychiatrist that I am working with), I have been fainting for about 3 weeks now. Nothing feels different as far as the Synthroid goes.

REPLY
@arabon

Thank you for moving this to a better discussion board 🙂

That discussion (High TSH and High T3) is actually what made me join this website. I honestly don't believe it's cancer, I read that most pituitary tumors are benign.

I feel sluggish, irritable, suicidal (I have a psychologist and psychiatrist that I am working with), I have been fainting for about 3 weeks now. Nothing feels different as far as the Synthroid goes.

Jump to this post

Fainting has to do with low blood sugar, usually. Low blood sugar can make you not think well at all. I wouldn't put up with fainting, as I had spells years ago when I had low blood sugar, mostly due to stress. I cured that problem with diet and lowering the noise and stress level in my home. I had low thyroid for years and was refused medication for it, as the new doctor said I didn't need it even though I had been on it for years. So I remain as confused as others about the proper treatment. Dorisena

Liked by arabon

REPLY
@arabon

I have had hypothyroidism for years and before we had a handle on it I put on a lot of weight and fast. All the medication did was steady my weight. It doesn't decrease or increase. I've always been weary of diabetes because it runs in my family, my bio mother has it as well as her mother.

My doctor isn't having me watch my diet or blood glucose levels. He did check my A1C and that's when he diagnosed me with diabetes. I'm depressed and upset so I really haven't been doing anything to help my health.

Jump to this post

I understand how feeling depressed and upset can have have the effect of lethargy, resulting in your not really doing anything to help yourself. It's really tough to accept a diagnosis – any diagnosis. And even harder still to make changes to our lifestyles. You've reached out, so that's a big step to move from denial to acceptance (with reluctance I'm sure, but still the right direction). It takes time. Small steps count.

You might enjoy this related discussion:
– Acceptance https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/acceptance/

Liked by arabon

REPLY

I am thinking about this professor I had in my nutrition class whose father-in-law was a doctor, and he said the man did not believe that his patients would do the difficult work of changing their diet for diabetes treatment, so he did not push the idea. He didn't want to lose patients. The doctor also got diabetes, dieted, lost weight, and then gave it up in despair and went on insulin shots because he said it was easier. Sometimes we have to convince our doctors of our determination to succeed in order to get the help and support we need in return, sad to say. That is why I stay on this conversation, because I believe we can get better and enjoy our life better with the hard work on our part. Go team! Dorisena

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.