Sudden Hearing Loss

Posted by eileen123 @eileen123, Jul 22, 2020

Hello, I am new to this group. At age 56, I recently suddenly lost all hearing in my right ear, and I am trying to process this significant impact and find support from others who have experienced the same sudden hearing loss. I welcome your feedback. I am in good hands with very experienced doctors at Mass Eye and Ear in Boston, but my treatment plan has not worked to date (oral steroids and ear injections). I have profound loss in right ear, and above average hearing in my left ear. Thanks for your insight and support. Eileen

@barbb

@nla4625, Great that you're coming out of hibernation! 🙂 What part of PA will you be in or near, if you don't mind my asking?

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I'm about 45 minutes north of Pittsburgh, where there is a HLLA chapter. It's nice to be near my 2 brothers and their families, although I haven't gotten together with them in almost a year because I'm in 3 high risk groups for Covid and am taking it quite seriously.

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@barbb

There is an additional choice for communication that I use and thankfully do not find it exhausting. That is the Captel phone. (There is another company that functions the same as Captel but at the moment I don't recall the name.) While the transcription on the Captel phone is not perfect, I am satisfied with its functioning. I can always ask the person speaking to repeat what they said, speak slower, or whatever, and sometimes I say to them "I'm relying on transcription, here's what they claim you said – could you correct it, if needed?"

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The other best known captioned phone is CaptionCall. Both Captel and CaptionCall are good quality.

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@wendymb

So well put, thank you. That is a huge issue, the social aspect. I will avoid crowds, loud restaurants, movie theaters, most group settings. I forgot about that, having been home for the last 10 Covid months!

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@wendymb @nla4625 The social aspect of hearing loss is not something that was part of my awareness. My training and permanent Mayo Clinic is in Behavioral/Mental Health. Moving forward I will certainly remember to use this new awareness forward, especially during social gatherings and group work of any kind. I really do appreciate your teaching me this.

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@golden418

if I am not to forward here, I think you should explore the B-Cros option. I too am deaf in my right ear (since 4 years of age- almost 60 years and have profound loss in the other – related to aging / perhaps overuse) and got my first pair of Phonax Bi-Cros 6 years ago. That did not work out well and I was going to give up. However, I did op, as a trial, for the next generation of Phoinax Bi-Cros (upgraded technology) and the difference is night and day. Although I still cannot echo locate, I can hear in the vehicle while driving (good ear was always to window), no longer search for "seating" that gave me the best chance to hear and other benefits. I am kind of bewildered that your audiologist would recommend nothing – my audiologist was insistent that my quality of life would improve and she was right. I am fortunate that my wife's health insurer pays for hearing aids (every four years).

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@golden418. I read about the Phonax BiCros and think getting it when it's safer to venture out will dramatically improve the quality of the rest of my life. Engineers did finally design something that could help me…I just didn't know about it. What a wonderful gift you have given me. Thank you so much for telling me about it! Best wishes, Nancy

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@julieo4

The other best known captioned phone is CaptionCall. Both Captel and CaptionCall are good quality.

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I have a Caption Call phone and it is pretty good. Main problem is that it often does not print out what is being said accurately. This is really an issue when dealing with banks and businesses where numbers are important. I have learned to always tell people at the beginning of the conversation about my hearing loss, the phone and ask them to speak clearly, slowly. Most people are very helpful but tend to forget as the conversation goes on. As of three weeks ago I can no longer hear anything even with hearing aids so I really rely on this phone. I also am doing a lot more business stuff online…. another learning curve.

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For years I have had to use the caption on the TV. It doesn't always say what is being said but most of the time, I wouldn't know the difference since my hearing is worse. I don't exactly know how to read the charts they give me but the numbers are down to 90. I think I have lost 90% of my hearing? Can anyone tell me? Thank you. Woogie.

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@erikas

@wendymb @nla4625 The social aspect of hearing loss is not something that was part of my awareness. My training and permanent Mayo Clinic is in Behavioral/Mental Health. Moving forward I will certainly remember to use this new awareness forward, especially during social gatherings and group work of any kind. I really do appreciate your teaching me this.

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@erikas Thank you for your nice note and for making every effort to learn about the challenges all of us with medical problems, not just hearing issues, face. A few other people in the hearing discussion group posted things about the importance of professionals working to help people with hearing issues knowing more about those challenges. I don't know the ins and outs of how we hear, but I do know what happens when you have only one good ear. All noise comes in at the same level and intensity, I often don't know where it is coming from, and my brain can't filter out background noise and let me focus on what I want or need to hear. It's just noise. To understand, I think if you sat in a car with 4 people and turned the volume of the radio up to the highest level and tried to carry on a conversation in a normal voice you would get an idea of how hard it is to hear when your brain can't filter out background noise and you can't hear comments from people in the back because you don't know they are speaking. Then turn away from the other person next to you so you can't see his/her face. Trying to hear when you can't filter out background noise, don't know where sound is coming from, and can't see the face of someone talking to you is exhausting, terribly frustrating and really impossible. If I am in a group setting, there is only so much I can deal with before I have to zone out or leave…which is why it is easier not to put myself in those situations. Anyway, I really applaud you for listening to the people on this site. We're all learning from each other. I'm really thankful for the wonderful work MayoConnect is doing to provide so much valuable information, for the knowledge, support and countless hours your volunteer mentors are spending to help us, and for the contributions my fellow travelers on the road to better health are making. Thank you all. Nancy

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@judyca7

I have a Caption Call phone and it is pretty good. Main problem is that it often does not print out what is being said accurately. This is really an issue when dealing with banks and businesses where numbers are important. I have learned to always tell people at the beginning of the conversation about my hearing loss, the phone and ask them to speak clearly, slowly. Most people are very helpful but tend to forget as the conversation goes on. As of three weeks ago I can no longer hear anything even with hearing aids so I really rely on this phone. I also am doing a lot more business stuff online…. another learning curve.

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@judyca7 I am amazed to see you talking about being able to print out the conversation on your Caption Call! I do find it ever so useful to have the other speaker's comments permanently recorded on my phone screen but was never aware of any possibility of recording them! I wonder if this is an option that only Caption Call has. I can easily find out by calling Captel. Perhaps it's an option that is only available in their most recent models. When the print out is not accurate, can you then consult your phone screen and correct the errors in the print out?

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@judyca7

I have a Caption Call phone and it is pretty good. Main problem is that it often does not print out what is being said accurately. This is really an issue when dealing with banks and businesses where numbers are important. I have learned to always tell people at the beginning of the conversation about my hearing loss, the phone and ask them to speak clearly, slowly. Most people are very helpful but tend to forget as the conversation goes on. As of three weeks ago I can no longer hear anything even with hearing aids so I really rely on this phone. I also am doing a lot more business stuff online…. another learning curve.

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Good that you are asking for clarification on those conversations. Also that you are upfront about your hearing issues. I wonder if your hearing aids have activated telecoil components in them? You say you're not hearing well with them, but the telecoil mode might make a big difference for you. While telecoils can connect hearing aids to many audio devices, they were first devised to connect to telephones; thus the name telecoil. Have you mentioned this sudden hearing loss of three weeks ago to your hearing healthcare provider?

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@woogie

For years I have had to use the caption on the TV. It doesn't always say what is being said but most of the time, I wouldn't know the difference since my hearing is worse. I don't exactly know how to read the charts they give me but the numbers are down to 90. I think I have lost 90% of my hearing? Can anyone tell me? Thank you. Woogie.

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@woogie …. Not knowing what the context of your "90" would be… I might venture a guess… I am profoundly deaf in my left ear.. but my hearing tests in my right ear show at what decibel (db) level I respond to the beeps… the noise in the test… In my right ear a noise has to be at 60db in certain frequencies..(ambient noise in a social situation can easily be at 60db … so if someone were to be talking to me they would have to be speaking at a higher level (louder) for me to hear…. In my left ear A noise has to be at 90 db.. (that is like a jet plane)… for me to hear … … Please tell us in what context are your "numbers" …Ken

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