Staying Motivated for the Long Haul

Posted by LindaF @fessmom, Jun 29, 2017

My biggest obstacle to maintaining a healthy weight is a seemingly invisible “switch” that goes on and off in my brain. When it’s “on” I am in the zone and can avoid the most decadent temptations and will exercise faithfully. But, about a year to 15 months into my healthy lifestyle, the switch turns to “off” and I lose focus and revert to my bad habits of poor food choices (both in what I eat and how much I eat) and I become more sedentary. I am at that point now and I feel a slow panic building as the number on the scale inches upward. I know what I should do, but I am at a loss as to how to get my mojo back. Suggestions, anyone!?

Like you I discounted wild elimination diets. I have always considered my diet healthy and have never been over weight, so dieting was inconceivable. Now I am a believer in diet change. Also have learned what is good for some is not good for all. For the first time in a long time my yeast symptoms are gone. Also rest assured, after the 2 month detox of all carbs and sugar you may gradually reintroduce good natural carbs, limited fruit amounts and yet processed sugar and processed carbs are to be avoided for life.

You like medical research so go to drhoffman.com and look up, "The Yeast Connection" vindicated- 35 years later. This article was written in 2016. Dr. Crook's book written 37 years ago was looked at skeptically by the medical community for decades. Now current research supports his claims. Dr. Crook, along with another pioneering doctor, Dr. Truss came to the conclusion that rampant antibiotic use, refined carb consumption and a medical infatuation with steroids conspired to turn many patients into "yeast factories". The by product is elevated inflammation.

Now years later researches are learning more about the gut/brain connection in which organism inhabit the intestines and commandeer the appetites, metabolism, and taste buds.

For me personally I had to kill or starve out my residual yeast and yes my cravings for processed sugar and even my beloved "healthy" fruit which I would eat at least 3 times a day has dramatically diminished. Yes I can grab a carrot (sure natural sugar in carrots, but still ok) or snack on some walnuts and enjoy them, not missing processed sugar. Yes my taste buds are changing.

There are newer anti inflammatory books on the market which I have read and never was motivated, they are overwhelming. I am not sure this old uncomplicated book is still in print, as I found it for 25 cents at the library used book section. His diet is simple, basically just say no to carbs or sugars in any form. Other diets are so complicated allowing a small amount of this or one particular fruit occasionally. He also had simple hand draw charts showing what happens to us when eating yeast feeding foods and teaching what yeast overload did to raise our internal inflammation.

Also as mentioned my book is a reprint from 2006 which includes an update in the appendix mentioning the 3 herbal or natural supplements to take daily to speed up the yeast killing process, which he states works as well as px meds. Yes, he allows traditional anti-yeast px meds, but says they are unnecessary following his plan. He reminds that anti-yeast meds are like a bandaid. If you don't eliminate the cause, your symptoms will reappear. Don't treat it, starve it do death.

Right now off to make my husband the pancakes and bacon and grease fried eggs he wants for breakfast. I am happy with my "good for me" choices. He doesn't have yeast or eczema, no inflammation he is trying to manage. I do believe pain is the biggest motivator getting us to change our life style. Those of us with yeast issues or eczema know what I am talking about.

Also as a side note,no change in energy level on diet- I have a ton of energy and notice no lack of energy, yet I am eating plenty of protein with my veggies. Yes on this diet one will feel hungry with a full stomach until the protein starts breaking down. A handful of walnuts helps as a snack or a glass of almond milk (no sugar added).Right now I feel great and ready to take on another busy day.

REPLY
@gardeningjunkie

Like you I discounted wild elimination diets. I have always considered my diet healthy and have never been over weight, so dieting was inconceivable. Now I am a believer in diet change. Also have learned what is good for some is not good for all. For the first time in a long time my yeast symptoms are gone. Also rest assured, after the 2 month detox of all carbs and sugar you may gradually reintroduce good natural carbs, limited fruit amounts and yet processed sugar and processed carbs are to be avoided for life.

You like medical research so go to drhoffman.com and look up, "The Yeast Connection" vindicated- 35 years later. This article was written in 2016. Dr. Crook's book written 37 years ago was looked at skeptically by the medical community for decades. Now current research supports his claims. Dr. Crook, along with another pioneering doctor, Dr. Truss came to the conclusion that rampant antibiotic use, refined carb consumption and a medical infatuation with steroids conspired to turn many patients into "yeast factories". The by product is elevated inflammation.

Now years later researches are learning more about the gut/brain connection in which organism inhabit the intestines and commandeer the appetites, metabolism, and taste buds.

For me personally I had to kill or starve out my residual yeast and yes my cravings for processed sugar and even my beloved "healthy" fruit which I would eat at least 3 times a day has dramatically diminished. Yes I can grab a carrot (sure natural sugar in carrots, but still ok) or snack on some walnuts and enjoy them, not missing processed sugar. Yes my taste buds are changing.

There are newer anti inflammatory books on the market which I have read and never was motivated, they are overwhelming. I am not sure this old uncomplicated book is still in print, as I found it for 25 cents at the library used book section. His diet is simple, basically just say no to carbs or sugars in any form. Other diets are so complicated allowing a small amount of this or one particular fruit occasionally. He also had simple hand draw charts showing what happens to us when eating yeast feeding foods and teaching what yeast overload did to raise our internal inflammation.

Also as mentioned my book is a reprint from 2006 which includes an update in the appendix mentioning the 3 herbal or natural supplements to take daily to speed up the yeast killing process, which he states works as well as px meds. Yes, he allows traditional anti-yeast px meds, but says they are unnecessary following his plan. He reminds that anti-yeast meds are like a bandaid. If you don't eliminate the cause, your symptoms will reappear. Don't treat it, starve it do death.

Right now off to make my husband the pancakes and bacon and grease fried eggs he wants for breakfast. I am happy with my "good for me" choices. He doesn't have yeast or eczema, no inflammation he is trying to manage. I do believe pain is the biggest motivator getting us to change our life style. Those of us with yeast issues or eczema know what I am talking about.

Also as a side note,no change in energy level on diet- I have a ton of energy and notice no lack of energy, yet I am eating plenty of protein with my veggies. Yes on this diet one will feel hungry with a full stomach until the protein starts breaking down. A handful of walnuts helps as a snack or a glass of almond milk (no sugar added).Right now I feel great and ready to take on another busy day.

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@gardenjunkie You go girl hooray for you

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@lioness

@gardenjunkie Diet sounds good I don't eat alot of fattening foods like sugar only in store bought so this is what I have to eliminate when shopping I live in a senior apt building where there,s donuts here every day at coffee Its my willpower I need to work on.How bout cheese? Did you have to eliminate it? After my by- pass Dr told me to get of fat in red meat I try to buy lean and cut of fat.My husband was a diabetic but loved apple pie with cinnamon ice cream I would eat half of it I blossomed and haven't wilted yet lol

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@lioness I’m trying hard to “wilt” myself right now but my willpower isn’t cooperating.
JK

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I purchased the Mayo Clinic Diet book. Does anyone have any experience with it? It looks like it makes a lot of sense. I'm hoping I can get my husband onboard, but I think it will be a struggle as he likes his sweets.
Thank you for any info,
JoDee

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@jodeej

I purchased the Mayo Clinic Diet book. Does anyone have any experience with it? It looks like it makes a lot of sense. I'm hoping I can get my husband onboard, but I think it will be a struggle as he likes his sweets.
Thank you for any info,
JoDee

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@jodeej Please let me know when you get started with it, how good the recipes are. My husband does not need to lose weight, he must have an amazing metabolism, so he is difficult to please.
JK

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@contentandwell I will! Reading through the book, the recipes look great and simple.

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@jodeej

@contentandwell I will! Reading through the book, the recipes look great and simple.

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I do have the Mayo Clinic Diet Book. I purchased it after my transplant because I wanted to develop healthy eating habits. I did not need to lose any weight back then, and I continue to use it as my guide. I especially like that it stresses a healthy-for-life plan for eating and it encourages activity. I find it to be encouraging and also flexible.
My nurses tease my husband at my visits that he must be benefiting, too!

Here is a link, if you want to read about the Mayo Clinic Diet.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/mayo-clinic-diet/art-20045460
There is also an online version of the diet plan.

REPLY
@rosemarya

I do have the Mayo Clinic Diet Book. I purchased it after my transplant because I wanted to develop healthy eating habits. I did not need to lose any weight back then, and I continue to use it as my guide. I especially like that it stresses a healthy-for-life plan for eating and it encourages activity. I find it to be encouraging and also flexible.
My nurses tease my husband at my visits that he must be benefiting, too!

Here is a link, if you want to read about the Mayo Clinic Diet.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/mayo-clinic-diet/art-20045460
There is also an online version of the diet plan.

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@rosemarya I've seen the online version. I like having the book since for me it's easier for reading.

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Exercise is never going to solve anyone's weight issues, unless you want to run a marathon every week or so. Then you could lose a pound or so per week. If I was overweight, intermittent fasting, combined with a keto diet is what I would do. But, in my opinion, that's a short-term fix. Long-term, it's all about the food we eat and food we don't eat. There are a couple of YouTube videos by Dr. Robert Lustig ("Sugar: The Bitter Truth" "Fructose 2.0") that really opened my eyes. I always knew that certain foods were bad for me, but I never knew why. And Dr. Lustig does a great job of explaining it. He dives into the biochemistry of the metabolism of fructose and glucose. His focus is on insulin resistance, and the evil things that happen to us once we become insulin resistant. Learning the role of hormones in this metabolism is fascinating. In general, our bodies naturally self-regulate satiety if our hormones are working right. And to help make that happen, elimination (or heavy reduction) of added sugar and other refined carbohydrates will give our liver and pancreas a chance to do their job and help our hormones do what they're supposed to do. I eat this way and it works for me. Steering clear of the perceived pleasure of sweets and the convenience of refined carbs is a small price to pay for feeling as good as I do. Oh, and I don't crave sweets and I'm never hungry.
Gary Taubes also has some great YouTube videos on this subject.

Liked by jodeej

REPLY
@mickj

Exercise is never going to solve anyone's weight issues, unless you want to run a marathon every week or so. Then you could lose a pound or so per week. If I was overweight, intermittent fasting, combined with a keto diet is what I would do. But, in my opinion, that's a short-term fix. Long-term, it's all about the food we eat and food we don't eat. There are a couple of YouTube videos by Dr. Robert Lustig ("Sugar: The Bitter Truth" "Fructose 2.0") that really opened my eyes. I always knew that certain foods were bad for me, but I never knew why. And Dr. Lustig does a great job of explaining it. He dives into the biochemistry of the metabolism of fructose and glucose. His focus is on insulin resistance, and the evil things that happen to us once we become insulin resistant. Learning the role of hormones in this metabolism is fascinating. In general, our bodies naturally self-regulate satiety if our hormones are working right. And to help make that happen, elimination (or heavy reduction) of added sugar and other refined carbohydrates will give our liver and pancreas a chance to do their job and help our hormones do what they're supposed to do. I eat this way and it works for me. Steering clear of the perceived pleasure of sweets and the convenience of refined carbs is a small price to pay for feeling as good as I do. Oh, and I don't crave sweets and I'm never hungry.
Gary Taubes also has some great YouTube videos on this subject.

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@mickj Good for you it is all about what we eat I believe if you watch what you eat and lose weight you,ll feel so good you will become active

Liked by jodeej

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@mickj

Exercise is never going to solve anyone's weight issues, unless you want to run a marathon every week or so. Then you could lose a pound or so per week. If I was overweight, intermittent fasting, combined with a keto diet is what I would do. But, in my opinion, that's a short-term fix. Long-term, it's all about the food we eat and food we don't eat. There are a couple of YouTube videos by Dr. Robert Lustig ("Sugar: The Bitter Truth" "Fructose 2.0") that really opened my eyes. I always knew that certain foods were bad for me, but I never knew why. And Dr. Lustig does a great job of explaining it. He dives into the biochemistry of the metabolism of fructose and glucose. His focus is on insulin resistance, and the evil things that happen to us once we become insulin resistant. Learning the role of hormones in this metabolism is fascinating. In general, our bodies naturally self-regulate satiety if our hormones are working right. And to help make that happen, elimination (or heavy reduction) of added sugar and other refined carbohydrates will give our liver and pancreas a chance to do their job and help our hormones do what they're supposed to do. I eat this way and it works for me. Steering clear of the perceived pleasure of sweets and the convenience of refined carbs is a small price to pay for feeling as good as I do. Oh, and I don't crave sweets and I'm never hungry.
Gary Taubes also has some great YouTube videos on this subject.

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The book "In Defense of Real Food" is eye opening also.

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@jodeej

The book "In Defense of Real Food" is eye opening also.

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@jodeej I'm going to look at u tube Dr Lustig Books sounds interesting

Liked by jodeej

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@lioness

@jodeej I'm going to look at u tube Dr Lustig Books sounds interesting

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@lioness the one I mentioned is by Michael Pollan. The correct title is "In Defense of Food".

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@jodeej

@lioness the one I mentioned is by Michael Pollan. The correct title is "In Defense of Food".

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@jodeej Thanks

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@jodeej I just watched Dr. Lustig talk about the sugar really an eye opener . Thanks for sharing this . Enjoyed it.

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