How long have you been sober?

Posted by trellg132 @trellg132, Sun, Aug 11 1:11pm
@mom23boys

Thank you for responding. Yes, I'm receiving oral Chemo (Ibrance) and other meds for my bones….cancer spread. I am living life like nothing changed; very little to no pain. I am one of the fortunate ones, at least at this point. Another reason not to drink.

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Putting you in my God box♡

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Congratulations!

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Aug 12 .. is my new date. had to 'fire' my sponsor.. and don't get to meetings anymore.. they are 1.5 hours away. winter is here… holidays are coming… still grieving a major death…. gonna be tough….

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@mcmurf2

Aug 12 .. is my new date. had to 'fire' my sponsor.. and don't get to meetings anymore.. they are 1.5 hours away. winter is here… holidays are coming… still grieving a major death…. gonna be tough….

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Hello @mcmurf2
I appreciate your update. I'm sorry to hear that you are not able to go to meetings anymore and that you have lost your sponsor. I hope you can find another group closer to home. Sometimes churches have recovery groups that go by different names other than AA. You might call churches nearby and see what might be available. You might be able to find a church-related grief support group as well.

Do you have someone you can reach out to as the holidays approach? It is important to have support.

Will you continue to post and let me know how you are doing?

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@mcmurf2

Aug 12 .. is my new date. had to 'fire' my sponsor.. and don't get to meetings anymore.. they are 1.5 hours away. winter is here… holidays are coming… still grieving a major death…. gonna be tough….

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Dont give up until the miracle happens!

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Oops, I accidentally hit send too soon. I wanted to add that while I always suggest to sponsees not to substitute on line meetings for live ones, this seems like a case where it may help you bridge the gap. Also working with a sponsor by phone is better than no sponsor. Keep reading the big book and get a hold of some Grapevine magazines. There are also some great AA speakers on YouTube.

Liked by kamama94

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@logansnana, well said. As a 74-year-old woman with a few 24 hours, I can attest to the fact that continuing daily contact with others in recovery, even if not face-to-face or at meetings, is vital not just to continuing sobriety but to serenity as well. I'm disabled with major medical problems and simply cannot attend meetings any more even though there is handicap/wheelchair transportation available here and my home group has lovingly built a wheelchair ramp for handicap access to the hall. Fortunately I live in an apartment complex where there are others in recovery and my door always is open to them as I have found that the key to sober happiness lies in service to others. Also fortunately, I have daily phone and internet contact with close friends in recovery. Even after all these years I still occasionally will phone someone to say my squirrel cage is full and they always help re-ground me. Just the act of reaching out, be it by phone or in a forum like this, can give steadiness to the recovery process. I sorely miss meetings and the physical presence of recovering people at the hall but life – and sobriety – still are sweet.

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Going on 9 months sober

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@logansnana

Oops, I accidentally hit send too soon. I wanted to add that while I always suggest to sponsees not to substitute on line meetings for live ones, this seems like a case where it may help you bridge the gap. Also working with a sponsor by phone is better than no sponsor. Keep reading the big book and get a hold of some Grapevine magazines. There are also some great AA speakers on YouTube.

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@logansnana – what do you feel has helped to keep you sober? Have you attended meetings and had a sponsor?

@mcmurf2 – if you are comfortable sharing, what happened with your sponsor?

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@kamama94

@logansnana, well said. As a 74-year-old woman with a few 24 hours, I can attest to the fact that continuing daily contact with others in recovery, even if not face-to-face or at meetings, is vital not just to continuing sobriety but to serenity as well. I'm disabled with major medical problems and simply cannot attend meetings any more even though there is handicap/wheelchair transportation available here and my home group has lovingly built a wheelchair ramp for handicap access to the hall. Fortunately I live in an apartment complex where there are others in recovery and my door always is open to them as I have found that the key to sober happiness lies in service to others. Also fortunately, I have daily phone and internet contact with close friends in recovery. Even after all these years I still occasionally will phone someone to say my squirrel cage is full and they always help re-ground me. Just the act of reaching out, be it by phone or in a forum like this, can give steadiness to the recovery process. I sorely miss meetings and the physical presence of recovering people at the hall but life – and sobriety – still are sweet.

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You have shared a very important key, @kamama94. That of reaching out to others. We all need the presence of other people to thrive. Sobriety is about more than just surviving but also thriving. Thanks for that great reminder.

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@lisalucier

@logansnana – what do you feel has helped to keep you sober? Have you attended meetings and had a sponsor?

@mcmurf2 – if you are comfortable sharing, what happened with your sponsor?

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Here is the Readers Digest version since there is so much nuance involved, I am happy to elaborate if anyone would like to know more on any of the points below.
1. I took several tear stained assessments and, through what I now feel was divine intervention, wound up at an outpatient treatment center for women called Residence XII in Kirkland, WA where I surrendered and learned how not to "should" on myself any longer.
2. Saturated myself in recovery information through reading and audio materials while attending sober functions where I eventually learned how to get comfortable with others and myself without self medicating for anxiety.
3. Attended three or more different meetings a week Living in a large metropolis I was blessed with the opportunity to try on all different kinds of meetings.
4. Found a women's AA home group and a sponsor
5. Began working the steps with my sponsor
6. Learned how to pray and meditate with my Higher Power
7. Took care of my body through a nutritious diet, exercise and rest when I needed it. Payed attention to when i was Hungry, Angry, Lonely or Tired, aka HALT.
8. Began accepting service work c(at the urge of my sponsor) right away starting with making coffee for my home group, then branching out to the AA district and then sponsorship. Sponsorship is the number one thing that helps keep me emotionally sober to this day!!!
9. Through the above process I was able to determine the need for further help via private counseling for about two years after I finished treatment. It saved my marriage.
Anyone reading this, I hope you take what you can use and let the rest go for now. Serenity, courage, and wisdom to you all.

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