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jacque6977
@jacque6977

Posts: 19
Joined: Jan 31, 2017

Small Intestine Bacteria Overgrowth

Posted by @jacque6977, Feb 22, 2017

My wife, after years of suffering from debilitating nausea and fatigue, has finally been diagnosed with SIBO as confirmed by a hydrogen breath test. It is estimated the bacteria has had at least two years to grow and may be well established. She has started on Xifaxan, at $35 per pill, but it is estimated that elimination of the SIBO may take up to six months. Her day now starts with her waking up with nausea and when she has a cup of tea and toast in the morning she gets sick within fifteen minutes thereafter. Her sickness is accompanied by violent belching, and at times she regurgitates liquid vile. The only drug she has for nausea is Zofran which does nothing for her. Are there any other SIBO sufferers that are experiencing the same symptoms, and what are you taking to reduce the nausea?

REPLY

@nanny23

Thanks so much for your reply. Have you heard of Iberogast? It’s a natural treatment for SIBO?

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Found it on Amazon. Thinking of trying it

My daughter suffered through 4 Clostridium difficile infections (bacterial overgrowth in large intestine), and Rifaximin (Xifaxan) was an effective treatment. Other antibiotics (Flagyl, Vancomycin) made her very very ill. Eventually we did a microbiome transplant and that cured her. Along the way we discovered a fructose intolerance that produces a lot of the symptoms you listed. That was discovered through a horribly uncomfortable breath test (drink a fructose solution, breathe into a tube to capture gasses). I wish you the best of luck caring for your wife. The Mayo Clinic is a wonderful place because of their “whole patient/grand rounds” approach. By the way, there is usually High Fructose Corn Syrup in bread. You have to read the labels. If you are interested in knowing more about fructose intolerance, reply to this and I’ll share all I know. I am always happy to help others because so many kind strangers helped us.

Hi all,
You may also be interested in this discussion about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet http://mayocl.in/1ti7kKO

@concernedmtnmom

My daughter suffered through 4 Clostridium difficile infections (bacterial overgrowth in large intestine), and Rifaximin (Xifaxan) was an effective treatment. Other antibiotics (Flagyl, Vancomycin) made her very very ill. Eventually we did a microbiome transplant and that cured her. Along the way we discovered a fructose intolerance that produces a lot of the symptoms you listed. That was discovered through a horribly uncomfortable breath test (drink a fructose solution, breathe into a tube to capture gasses). I wish you the best of luck caring for your wife. The Mayo Clinic is a wonderful place because of their “whole patient/grand rounds” approach. By the way, there is usually High Fructose Corn Syrup in bread. You have to read the labels. If you are interested in knowing more about fructose intolerance, reply to this and I’ll share all I know. I am always happy to help others because so many kind strangers helped us.

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Thanks for bringing up fructose intolerance, I’ve mentioned this several times in the past. I had cut out all carbs except fruit and even had a negative test at Mayo, once I cut out fruit my life changed! I had been battling for 40 years and now cured!! Everyone raves about fruit being an important part of our diets but for about 30% of the population has problems digesting fruit and all related foods.. Your right about breads and just about every processed food has fructose and sugars. I only eat whole foods so I can control what I’m eating, it may be boring but at 65 I feel better then I have in 40 years! If interested please read my prior posts.

@lizbee78

I was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic this past November with SIBO, small bowel damage, and Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency. After 25 years of suffering I am finally feeling well. The Mayo put me through a round of 3 different antibiotics to kill the bacteria. I was told to begin taking Align Probiotic daily. Probiotics are very important in keeping the bad bacteria from taking over. I include probiotic rich foods in my diet daily in addition to the Align, such as Kefir, yogurt, Kombucha, supplemented juice blends. I no longer really need anti-nausea medicine, but I used to take Promethazine, which I found to work better than Zofran. I also found that a simple Gas-X chewable would often help with belching and bloating. SIBO creates an excessive amount of gas. I hope this helps, and that your wife feels better soon!

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Hi @lizbee78, may I ask if you were diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (and if so, with whom did you work)? I met with a GI doctor there once before, but he completely disregarded my breath test which revealed extremely levels of Hydrogen gas. Would love to get connected with a doctor there who understands SIBO and will work with me to eradicate it. Thanks so much!

@lizbee78

I was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic this past November with SIBO, small bowel damage, and Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency. After 25 years of suffering I am finally feeling well. The Mayo put me through a round of 3 different antibiotics to kill the bacteria. I was told to begin taking Align Probiotic daily. Probiotics are very important in keeping the bad bacteria from taking over. I include probiotic rich foods in my diet daily in addition to the Align, such as Kefir, yogurt, Kombucha, supplemented juice blends. I no longer really need anti-nausea medicine, but I used to take Promethazine, which I found to work better than Zofran. I also found that a simple Gas-X chewable would often help with belching and bloating. SIBO creates an excessive amount of gas. I hope this helps, and that your wife feels better soon!

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Yes, I was at the Mayo in Rochester, MN. I was treated by Dr. Andres J. Acosta Cardenas. I hope you can get the correct diagnosis and treatment plan.

There’s seems to be interest in the Special Carb Diet, but the Fructose Intolerance Diet is a bit different, based on what i read at the links given. So let me share what I know about the Fructose Intolerance Diet.

First, everyone on this string deserves a round of applause for their bravery, persistence, and fortitude. What you’re dealing with is not easy and you deserve a medal or something!

My understanding of a fructose-avoidant diet is that you can’t eat foods that have more fructose than glucose in them. If it’s a 50/50 split, you can tolerate them. But when there’s more fructose, you lose. In a bit I’ll list a few no-no foods for fructose intolerants, but first a pro tip I found on a blog written by a fructose-free family. It may not be for everyone, but here goes: If you have to eat a food with a majority of fructose OR you don’t know the exact fructose makeup of the food, you can eat Smarties or SweetTarts before you ingest that questionable food. These two candies are made of pure dextrose, which minimizes the impact of the fructose (essentially dilutes it). So we have used that strategy with success. BUT IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THAT MONOSACCHARIDE, don’t try it. I am not a doctor.

Here are fructose-intensive foods to avoid: APPLES, PEARS, GRAPES, WATERMELON, mangoes, raisins, and all stone fruits, such as PEACHES, CHERRIES, NECTARINES, PLUMS, etc. Stone fruits contain sugar alcohols called propyls, and they cause intestinal distress for fructose-adverse people. Sugar alcohols include: maltitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol…all the -tol ending compounds. Again, check with your doctor. We also avoid saccharin, sucralose, and any other artificial sweetener.

Avoid fruit juices and blends as they usually contain apple, pear or grape juice or worse, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, which is poison, in my opinion.

Also avoid monosaccharide foods such as beans and legumes. They can cause misery.

Friendly fruits include: all berries (yay!), kiwi, citrus fruits, bananas. That’s about it.

Most veggies are safe, but there are a few exceptions. Here’s a good webpage on what’s safe:
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/foods-allowed-fructoserestricted-diet-1553.html

Last, sweeteners: NO HONEY, NO AGAVE NECTAR/SYRUP, but white sugar and maple syrup are ok.

When we were there a few years ago, the Mayo Clinic didn’t have very great info on what was allowed, but it was somewhat helpful. I hope they have gotten better info for patients in the meantime. It’s not a bad idea to seek out a nutritional counselor if such a thing exists where you live.

I hope that helps IF you find that fructose is the source of misery. If you have other sugar category issues, this could all be worthless info. This only helps if you are fructose intolerant. It’s a pretty easy adjustment, but you need to read food labels for the rest of your days. And carry Smarties candies around just in case. : )

@concernedmtnmom

There’s seems to be interest in the Special Carb Diet, but the Fructose Intolerance Diet is a bit different, based on what i read at the links given. So let me share what I know about the Fructose Intolerance Diet.

First, everyone on this string deserves a round of applause for their bravery, persistence, and fortitude. What you’re dealing with is not easy and you deserve a medal or something!

My understanding of a fructose-avoidant diet is that you can’t eat foods that have more fructose than glucose in them. If it’s a 50/50 split, you can tolerate them. But when there’s more fructose, you lose. In a bit I’ll list a few no-no foods for fructose intolerants, but first a pro tip I found on a blog written by a fructose-free family. It may not be for everyone, but here goes: If you have to eat a food with a majority of fructose OR you don’t know the exact fructose makeup of the food, you can eat Smarties or SweetTarts before you ingest that questionable food. These two candies are made of pure dextrose, which minimizes the impact of the fructose (essentially dilutes it). So we have used that strategy with success. BUT IF YOU CAN’T HANDLE THAT MONOSACCHARIDE, don’t try it. I am not a doctor.

Here are fructose-intensive foods to avoid: APPLES, PEARS, GRAPES, WATERMELON, mangoes, raisins, and all stone fruits, such as PEACHES, CHERRIES, NECTARINES, PLUMS, etc. Stone fruits contain sugar alcohols called propyls, and they cause intestinal distress for fructose-adverse people. Sugar alcohols include: maltitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol…all the -tol ending compounds. Again, check with your doctor. We also avoid saccharin, sucralose, and any other artificial sweetener.

Avoid fruit juices and blends as they usually contain apple, pear or grape juice or worse, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, which is poison, in my opinion.

Also avoid monosaccharide foods such as beans and legumes. They can cause misery.

Friendly fruits include: all berries (yay!), kiwi, citrus fruits, bananas. That’s about it.

Most veggies are safe, but there are a few exceptions. Here’s a good webpage on what’s safe:
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/foods-allowed-fructoserestricted-diet-1553.html

Last, sweeteners: NO HONEY, NO AGAVE NECTAR/SYRUP, but white sugar and maple syrup are ok.

When we were there a few years ago, the Mayo Clinic didn’t have very great info on what was allowed, but it was somewhat helpful. I hope they have gotten better info for patients in the meantime. It’s not a bad idea to seek out a nutritional counselor if such a thing exists where you live.

I hope that helps IF you find that fructose is the source of misery. If you have other sugar category issues, this could all be worthless info. This only helps if you are fructose intolerant. It’s a pretty easy adjustment, but you need to read food labels for the rest of your days. And carry Smarties candies around just in case. : )

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Thanks! I’ve been posting about fructose intolerance for awhile. It was the cause of my acid reflux and even after surgery could not get off meds until I cut off all fruit. I can’t even eat berries! For those of you having problems please give it a try, I felt better the next day and have never taking a acid reducer since!

I have small bowel obstructions and also have nausea, and I find Phenergan good help with it. Good luck.

@lizbee78

I was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic this past November with SIBO, small bowel damage, and Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency. After 25 years of suffering I am finally feeling well. The Mayo put me through a round of 3 different antibiotics to kill the bacteria. I was told to begin taking Align Probiotic daily. Probiotics are very important in keeping the bad bacteria from taking over. I include probiotic rich foods in my diet daily in addition to the Align, such as Kefir, yogurt, Kombucha, supplemented juice blends. I no longer really need anti-nausea medicine, but I used to take Promethazine, which I found to work better than Zofran. I also found that a simple Gas-X chewable would often help with belching and bloating. SIBO creates an excessive amount of gas. I hope this helps, and that your wife feels better soon!

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Thank you so much, @lizbee78! I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your taking the time to respond. I’m certainly encouraged reading of your success at Mayo, and hope I’m soon on the right treatment plan, as well. Thank you, again!!

@lizbee78

I was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic this past November with SIBO, small bowel damage, and Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency. After 25 years of suffering I am finally feeling well. The Mayo put me through a round of 3 different antibiotics to kill the bacteria. I was told to begin taking Align Probiotic daily. Probiotics are very important in keeping the bad bacteria from taking over. I include probiotic rich foods in my diet daily in addition to the Align, such as Kefir, yogurt, Kombucha, supplemented juice blends. I no longer really need anti-nausea medicine, but I used to take Promethazine, which I found to work better than Zofran. I also found that a simple Gas-X chewable would often help with belching and bloating. SIBO creates an excessive amount of gas. I hope this helps, and that your wife feels better soon!

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Thank you so much, @lizbee78! I can’t thank you enough for responding so quickly and letting me know with whom you worked. May I ask just one more question? The GI doctor I met with last time suggested that since the Hydrogen & Methane levels didn’t peak until the 90+ minute, it likely was coming from my colon and thus wasn’t SIBO. If you’d be comfortable sharing with me, did you experience high levels of hydrogen and/or methane before the 90 minute mark?

OMGosh, I have the same exact issues! My Gastro. is not very knowledgeable about SIBO and I am even surprised he knew to do a breath test. I live in Oklahoma where there is very little concern for health issues, so getting help is impossible!! He keeps treating me with X drug, like you (very expensive, I have no insurance), once it’s gone, the issues starts again! It’s like a viscous cycle and meantime my life sucks, low on energy lay around alot and afraid to eat for fear of an episode of stomach bloating. SOMEONE has got to get a hold on this and help us ALL!!

I am totally new to this issue, even though I have suffer and been “treated” for acid re-flux for years! Now I wonder if I ever had acid re-flux! When I accidentally found out (my gastro. nurse said I had it, two days ago), I started to read about it. Apparently, the re-flux meds totally upset the whole system and may be what has been giving me such episodes. Apparently, my gastro has known, but did not share it with me? I would have stopped the reflux meds back in January!! I am beginning to believe there is NO DOCTORS in my state that really care! At this point, I am not sure WHERE to start. I did call and FINALLY got new script for XIFAXAN, but can only afford, week by week, the 14 days supply, will it help or not? Second, I am not sure what I should and should not eat, I read about the Align Probiotics, so I will start those soon. ANYONE who can suggest ANYTHING at this point would be wonderful! Thanks in advance…JK

Please read my posts

@jacquelinek1956

OMGosh, I have the same exact issues! My Gastro. is not very knowledgeable about SIBO and I am even surprised he knew to do a breath test. I live in Oklahoma where there is very little concern for health issues, so getting help is impossible!! He keeps treating me with X drug, like you (very expensive, I have no insurance), once it’s gone, the issues starts again! It’s like a viscous cycle and meantime my life sucks, low on energy lay around alot and afraid to eat for fear of an episode of stomach bloating. SOMEONE has got to get a hold on this and help us ALL!!

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Please read my posts, I had 20 years of Ned’s and surgery before I found out the cause

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