Renal - Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysm

Posted by trevilo @trevilo, Aug 1, 2018

I am having s1 and l 4&5 issues, I got an MRI and X-ray done to check it out, but the dr saw a 1.4-centimeter aneurysm on the aortic vein going to my left kidney(Renal an aortic aneurysm). So I just went back to the vascular dr after 6 weeks, did a sonogram and said there was no change, so he doesn’t want to see me for another 6 months, and I was cleared to have surgery on my back if I needed it. But now I’m freaking out about it, because I have passed two kidney stones. I’m supposed to go back to work ( school bus driver) in three weeks. I’m hurting because of my back and the stones, but mostly I’m stressed out because of an aneurysm and going back to work. I’m not dealing well with any of this I just want to take the meds and stay in bed and never get up, I just don’t know what to do, I would appreciate any suggestions.

Hello @trevilo and welcome to Connect. I would like to invite back some members that discussed renal aneurysm's in the past: @mlan68 and @jms7.

@trevilo, you may notice that I made the primary group of this discussion the Aortic Aneurysm group. I did this so other members from this group can also chime in even though that may not have experience with the exact aneurysm you discussed. You may also find it worth your time to click on VIEW & REPLY if you are replying by email, so you can check out some of the other discussions and what other members have been discussing about their aortic aneurysms. Did your medical provider give you permission to go back to work or have an opinion about you returning to work?

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Hi @trevilo,

I was wondering how you are doing; have you found any relief for the back pain? I’m including some information from Mayo Clinic on aortic aneurysms, and also copied a few details, which I sincerely hope will help you with your concerns about having an aneurysm:

"The goal of treatment is to prevent your aneurysm from rupturing. Generally, your treatment options are medical monitoring or surgery. Your doctor's decision depends on the size of the aortic aneurysm and how fast it's growing.If your aortic aneurysm is small and you're not experiencing symptoms, your doctor may recommend medical monitoring, which includes regular appointments to make sure your aneurysm isn't growing, and management of other medical conditions that could worsen your aneurysm." https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350693

I look forward to hearing back from you.

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@plj44

I want to know if anyone else is dealing with these two life threatening conditions at the same time, and how are you coping with it physically and mentally?

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My husband has just been to the Cleveland Clinic because of the location of his AAA. He had open heart surgery 4 years ago and has CAD. His ejection fraction is 40-45. At the Cleveland Clinic, a research trial has been going on for about 10 years treating AAA that involves placing a stent that is made to the specific patient’s anatomy so that there are openings at the exact point of the kidney, gastric and all arteries involved in that area. After the stent is placed in the aorta, via the femoral artery, then another guide places stents in each of the arteries mentioned above. It takes 3 months for the device (stent or graft) to be made in Australia, two wks to ship to Cleveland Clinic and two wks to schedule the surgery. CC and a site in California are the only two places in the US that do this. However, it is being done routinely in Europe, Canada and Australia. My husband is 83 and may be too high a risk to have the procedure done as he has COPD and some other health issues. His aneurysm is long and measures 7 cm in diameter. The doctor explained to us that the surgery takes 6 hrs, at least 3 days in ICU and several days on the hospital unit until he is strong enough to return to Cincinnati to a rehabilitation facility for however long it takes for nearly complete recovery. There is a 2-7% risk of paralysis from the waist down, heart attack, and stroke, plus others. If he wants to take the risks, he is eligible for the procedure. As far as coping, he is taking it a day at a time but I think he is pretty depressed and fearful of a rupture of the aneurysm. We do pray continually for guidance and peace to accept what will be.

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@plj44

I want to know if anyone else is dealing with these two life threatening conditions at the same time, and how are you coping with it physically and mentally?

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My mother just found out she has and an aortic abdominal aneurysm and its 3cm she just found out today. I am looking for any advice and information. How is your husband doing?

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@jessicalatessa

My mother just found out she has and an aortic abdominal aneurysm and its 3cm she just found out today. I am looking for any advice and information. How is your husband doing?

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Hi Jessica

I do not have the diagnosis of AAA but thought I could offer some possible help for both you and your mom of
some emotions you may begin to have. I have a diagnosis of CAD and a new diagnosis this past May. The medical professionals tell us how to treat our diagnoses, but no one really covers the emotional roller coaster you are going to be on. I still deal with so many emotions. I cry, I get angry, I scream, I want to be alone, I want to have a hug from a good friend. Your mom will probably be feeling some of these and you may also go through them also. My suggestion to you both is to let yourself feel these and let each other know, if you can. Let the other family members know also. None of us know how we are going to react to our diagnoses. Just ask them to try to understand, as this is new for everyone. I tell myself daily…..things will work out….maybe today, maybe tomorrow….we don’t know when….just keep thinking positive.

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@mlan68

My 68 year old very energetic “on the go” mom got sick in Feb. of this year with a cold that progressed to the point of an ER visit at the end of March. A CT scan revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the endovascular repair was done at the end of April. As soon as she exited the recovery room she became sick vomiting and diarrhea and after being released made 6 more trips back to the hospital where some led to admittance for more than 7 days.

Between the end of April post repair and now, she was back 6 times, lost weight due to the vomiting and diarrhea, had no appetite and simply couldn’t keep anything down and had low right abdominal pain her and there that radiated to her back. The longest stay was due to C diff. infection. The doctor said he really wasn’t sure that was her problem but he was out of options to diagnose her with. She was finally able to eat a little and begin to recover.

June 14 she called the ambulance due to a sharp pain in her right lower quadrant of her abdomen radiating to her back and was released on June 22. The reason was for a right kidney infarction that was later denied by another doctor. There were so many doctors and each said something contrary to the other. I decided the best route was to get a copy of the doctors notes from the visit. In these notes I found the tests revealed 2 heart valve regurgitation, kidney infarction, kidney injury, bibasilar atelectasis which is a partial collapse of a lung a breathing complication after surgery and another even bigger renal aortic aneurysm among other things.

I don’t mean to scare anybody but I wonder a few things. Why were we not informed of some of the findings? How did they miss another aneurysm or did they indeed cause it? Why does the vascular surgeon not cooperate with the diagnosis and treatment of her problem and just keep giving her the “everything is fine” spill? When I called for the follow up appointment the hospital recommended the doctor had told them to tell us that the only thing needed was the 3 month visit, nothing quicker. I’m not trying to point a finger just trying to find someone to help my mom. It’s hard to see her weak and sick and worry about whether or not today is the last day with her. Before the surgery she was so vibrant, even having the great grandkids over for the summer. Something happened to my mom in that operating room and I really need to find out what it’s going to take to get her back to where she was.

There’s so much that could have happened including aortic infection and I don’t want anyone in trouble just help for her. In addition, she’s diabetic, anemic and has COPD. One of her plaque meds valsartan is suspected to worsen the kidney infarction.

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Hi @mlan68, and welcome to Connect. Thanks for sharing your mom’s journey with the group, as I feel other members might be able to relate. I can only imagine how frightening and frustrating all of this must be. I’m including some information from Mayo Clinic on aortic aneurysms: http://mayocl.in/28UWOka. I’m also tagging a few Connect members who have discussed this condition, @plj44 and @jessicalatessa.

@mlan68, have you considered getting a second opinion with the latest notes? Please keep the group posted on how she’s doing.

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@mlan68

My 68 year old very energetic “on the go” mom got sick in Feb. of this year with a cold that progressed to the point of an ER visit at the end of March. A CT scan revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the endovascular repair was done at the end of April. As soon as she exited the recovery room she became sick vomiting and diarrhea and after being released made 6 more trips back to the hospital where some led to admittance for more than 7 days.

Between the end of April post repair and now, she was back 6 times, lost weight due to the vomiting and diarrhea, had no appetite and simply couldn’t keep anything down and had low right abdominal pain her and there that radiated to her back. The longest stay was due to C diff. infection. The doctor said he really wasn’t sure that was her problem but he was out of options to diagnose her with. She was finally able to eat a little and begin to recover.

June 14 she called the ambulance due to a sharp pain in her right lower quadrant of her abdomen radiating to her back and was released on June 22. The reason was for a right kidney infarction that was later denied by another doctor. There were so many doctors and each said something contrary to the other. I decided the best route was to get a copy of the doctors notes from the visit. In these notes I found the tests revealed 2 heart valve regurgitation, kidney infarction, kidney injury, bibasilar atelectasis which is a partial collapse of a lung a breathing complication after surgery and another even bigger renal aortic aneurysm among other things.

I don’t mean to scare anybody but I wonder a few things. Why were we not informed of some of the findings? How did they miss another aneurysm or did they indeed cause it? Why does the vascular surgeon not cooperate with the diagnosis and treatment of her problem and just keep giving her the “everything is fine” spill? When I called for the follow up appointment the hospital recommended the doctor had told them to tell us that the only thing needed was the 3 month visit, nothing quicker. I’m not trying to point a finger just trying to find someone to help my mom. It’s hard to see her weak and sick and worry about whether or not today is the last day with her. Before the surgery she was so vibrant, even having the great grandkids over for the summer. Something happened to my mom in that operating room and I really need to find out what it’s going to take to get her back to where she was.

There’s so much that could have happened including aortic infection and I don’t want anyone in trouble just help for her. In addition, she’s diabetic, anemic and has COPD. One of her plaque meds valsartan is suspected to worsen the kidney infarction.

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That’s what I’m in the process of. I considered the Mayo Clinic and have an appointment request form that I am filling out. However, if I could stay closer to home which is North Georgia it would be better. I need opinions on places like Emory or St. Josephs which is in Atlanta unless the Mayo has a more advanced testing, etc. option. No drive is too far to help mom. Anybody know of any places to start since I want to be sure I choose the best facility for her conditions. Since there are multiple conditions one may fit better than another would.

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@mlan68

My 68 year old very energetic “on the go” mom got sick in Feb. of this year with a cold that progressed to the point of an ER visit at the end of March. A CT scan revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the endovascular repair was done at the end of April. As soon as she exited the recovery room she became sick vomiting and diarrhea and after being released made 6 more trips back to the hospital where some led to admittance for more than 7 days.

Between the end of April post repair and now, she was back 6 times, lost weight due to the vomiting and diarrhea, had no appetite and simply couldn’t keep anything down and had low right abdominal pain her and there that radiated to her back. The longest stay was due to C diff. infection. The doctor said he really wasn’t sure that was her problem but he was out of options to diagnose her with. She was finally able to eat a little and begin to recover.

June 14 she called the ambulance due to a sharp pain in her right lower quadrant of her abdomen radiating to her back and was released on June 22. The reason was for a right kidney infarction that was later denied by another doctor. There were so many doctors and each said something contrary to the other. I decided the best route was to get a copy of the doctors notes from the visit. In these notes I found the tests revealed 2 heart valve regurgitation, kidney infarction, kidney injury, bibasilar atelectasis which is a partial collapse of a lung a breathing complication after surgery and another even bigger renal aortic aneurysm among other things.

I don’t mean to scare anybody but I wonder a few things. Why were we not informed of some of the findings? How did they miss another aneurysm or did they indeed cause it? Why does the vascular surgeon not cooperate with the diagnosis and treatment of her problem and just keep giving her the “everything is fine” spill? When I called for the follow up appointment the hospital recommended the doctor had told them to tell us that the only thing needed was the 3 month visit, nothing quicker. I’m not trying to point a finger just trying to find someone to help my mom. It’s hard to see her weak and sick and worry about whether or not today is the last day with her. Before the surgery she was so vibrant, even having the great grandkids over for the summer. Something happened to my mom in that operating room and I really need to find out what it’s going to take to get her back to where she was.

There’s so much that could have happened including aortic infection and I don’t want anyone in trouble just help for her. In addition, she’s diabetic, anemic and has COPD. One of her plaque meds valsartan is suspected to worsen the kidney infarction.

Jump to this post

Consumer Reports has some information on choosing a top hospital that might be helpful in your research:
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2014/08/six-tips-for-choosing-the-right-hospital-for-surgery/index.htm
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2013/01/how-to-choose-a-hospital/index.htm

There’s also sites like HealthGrades or ZocDoc for physician reviews or even Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors. They are all free and reading reviews from others may help.

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@mlan68

My 68 year old very energetic “on the go” mom got sick in Feb. of this year with a cold that progressed to the point of an ER visit at the end of March. A CT scan revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the endovascular repair was done at the end of April. As soon as she exited the recovery room she became sick vomiting and diarrhea and after being released made 6 more trips back to the hospital where some led to admittance for more than 7 days.

Between the end of April post repair and now, she was back 6 times, lost weight due to the vomiting and diarrhea, had no appetite and simply couldn’t keep anything down and had low right abdominal pain her and there that radiated to her back. The longest stay was due to C diff. infection. The doctor said he really wasn’t sure that was her problem but he was out of options to diagnose her with. She was finally able to eat a little and begin to recover.

June 14 she called the ambulance due to a sharp pain in her right lower quadrant of her abdomen radiating to her back and was released on June 22. The reason was for a right kidney infarction that was later denied by another doctor. There were so many doctors and each said something contrary to the other. I decided the best route was to get a copy of the doctors notes from the visit. In these notes I found the tests revealed 2 heart valve regurgitation, kidney infarction, kidney injury, bibasilar atelectasis which is a partial collapse of a lung a breathing complication after surgery and another even bigger renal aortic aneurysm among other things.

I don’t mean to scare anybody but I wonder a few things. Why were we not informed of some of the findings? How did they miss another aneurysm or did they indeed cause it? Why does the vascular surgeon not cooperate with the diagnosis and treatment of her problem and just keep giving her the “everything is fine” spill? When I called for the follow up appointment the hospital recommended the doctor had told them to tell us that the only thing needed was the 3 month visit, nothing quicker. I’m not trying to point a finger just trying to find someone to help my mom. It’s hard to see her weak and sick and worry about whether or not today is the last day with her. Before the surgery she was so vibrant, even having the great grandkids over for the summer. Something happened to my mom in that operating room and I really need to find out what it’s going to take to get her back to where she was.

There’s so much that could have happened including aortic infection and I don’t want anyone in trouble just help for her. In addition, she’s diabetic, anemic and has COPD. One of her plaque meds valsartan is suspected to worsen the kidney infarction.

Jump to this post

Hi @mlan68,
I wanted to add my welcome to you as well. When caring for my father, I recommended my mother always ask to copies of tests and reports. During his journey with cancer, I was surprised how often her trusty binder became the source that team members turned to to verify things (medications, test results, etc.) especially when transitioning from one point of care to another. You were wise to have gathered this information. I’m sorry that you discovered things you wish you had been told. You mother has a multiple complex issues and seeking out the best is very wise.

@caretothepeople offered some great resources for finding care facilities. I will also point out that several hospitals, including some in Georgia and nearby, are part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. See the listing here http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic/care-network/members Mayo Clinic Care Network members share Mayo Clinic’s patient-centered culture and commitment to improving the delivery of health care. Potential members go through a thorough evaluation, including a review process that includes overview and site visits.

You may also wish to read this thread https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-2b62d0/ and connect with @janetpomponio and @elsinann.

How is your mom doing today?

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@colleenyoung

Hi @mlan68,
I wanted to add my welcome to you as well. When caring for my father, I recommended my mother always ask to copies of tests and reports. During his journey with cancer, I was surprised how often her trusty binder became the source that team members turned to to verify things (medications, test results, etc.) especially when transitioning from one point of care to another. You were wise to have gathered this information. I’m sorry that you discovered things you wish you had been told. You mother has a multiple complex issues and seeking out the best is very wise.

@caretothepeople offered some great resources for finding care facilities. I will also point out that several hospitals, including some in Georgia and nearby, are part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. See the listing here http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic/care-network/members Mayo Clinic Care Network members share Mayo Clinic’s patient-centered culture and commitment to improving the delivery of health care. Potential members go through a thorough evaluation, including a review process that includes overview and site visits.

You may also wish to read this thread https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-2b62d0/ and connect with @janetpomponio and @elsinann.

How is your mom doing today?

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Thanks Collen, Mom is still struggling with recovering. She gets tired quickly and you can hear it in her voice when you call. She’s still not back to doing the things she once loved and I’m so ready to have her back with us. She gets joy out of having the great grand kids over so thank goodness for summer. I want to thank you all so much, it helps to have all this input as I am at a loss for the best route to take. I don’t know if I should carry her back to her current surgeon while I continue to look for a better place to get her or what. I’m so scared that she’s going to be gone before I can find the right doctor.

I need to retrieve the medical records from her other visits along with some of the lab work for the last one. I plan to do that this week. I would like to know also if there’s anywhere that any of you know of that I can find any and all complications that could result from the AAA repair. The notes that I’m looking at now seem to hint at the cause of her current issues being a result of the surgery. What’s disturbing is they have yet to figure out what is going on with her and causing her abdominal pain that radiates to her back and the nausea that occurs with it. From what I’ve researched, her symptoms point to either Aortic Aneurysm or an autoimmune disorder or TB. She began with this cold that kept growing until she couldn’t breathe and was finally diagnosed with pneumonia and COPD. Her lungs were covered with these places on the CT scan they did. That’s how they found the AAA.

I appreciate all the input and info you all can manage to donate.

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@caretothepeople

Consumer Reports has some information on choosing a top hospital that might be helpful in your research:
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2014/08/six-tips-for-choosing-the-right-hospital-for-surgery/index.htm
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2013/01/how-to-choose-a-hospital/index.htm

There’s also sites like HealthGrades or ZocDoc for physician reviews or even Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors. They are all free and reading reviews from others may help.

Jump to this post

That is perfect care, thanks so much.

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@colleenyoung

Hi @mlan68,
I wanted to add my welcome to you as well. When caring for my father, I recommended my mother always ask to copies of tests and reports. During his journey with cancer, I was surprised how often her trusty binder became the source that team members turned to to verify things (medications, test results, etc.) especially when transitioning from one point of care to another. You were wise to have gathered this information. I’m sorry that you discovered things you wish you had been told. You mother has a multiple complex issues and seeking out the best is very wise.

@caretothepeople offered some great resources for finding care facilities. I will also point out that several hospitals, including some in Georgia and nearby, are part of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. See the listing here http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic/care-network/members Mayo Clinic Care Network members share Mayo Clinic’s patient-centered culture and commitment to improving the delivery of health care. Potential members go through a thorough evaluation, including a review process that includes overview and site visits.

You may also wish to read this thread https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-2b62d0/ and connect with @janetpomponio and @elsinann.

How is your mom doing today?

Jump to this post

I found this in-depth patient information on Abdominal aortic aneurysm (Beyond the Basics) from Wolters Kluwer “UpToDate” website http://www.uptodate.com/contents/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-beyond-the-basics#H17517696. Here are some excerpts:

“Surgical risk. The risk of surgery varies for each individual and the magnitude of risk may be estimated. Patients whose surgical risk is estimated to be high may do better with watchful waiting or less invasive aneurysm repair. … Surgery of any kind carries certain risks that vary from one person to another, depending upon the patient’s general state of health. The surgical risk for repair of AAA increases with age and the presence of other health conditions. As examples, people who have other heart or lung diseases, and people who smoke are more likely to develop complications such as pneumonia and irregularities in their heart rates after surgery. In addition, older adults are more prone to develop problems (such as cardiac events and stroke) both during and after surgery.”

Good luck with your research @mlan68. Our bodies are complex and when we have multiple conditions, it can be challenging to find answers with one specialist. It sounds like your mom has a team of people working with you both. Are you able to share your findings and suspicions with them?

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