Premarin for older women

Posted by pattitoo @pattitoo, Mar 19, 2017

At 74, yes 74 I still have hot flashes, Premarin now taken occasionally, Ia m trying to wean myself off of this med, however
it works. Medicare does not approved of it and my co-pay using my insurance is $1,000 a year, each 90 day supply is $250.
My drug plan is separate from my Blue Cross Plan F. For now I am getting Premarin from a RELIABLE Canadian Pharmacy,
saving me considerable money.
My question is, how many seniors still have hot flashes and take a hormone?
Because of controversy of hormone meds and older ladies, I have drastically reduced my intake.
Anyone else having hot flashes and needing/wanting help?
You input will be of value to others I am sure.

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Women's Health group.

@jumbley39

Thank you! I just registered with Canada On Line Health and asked my doctor to fax my Premarin prescription.

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They are a superb pharmacy, very nice, very professional, very throrough!

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@cherriann

Update: Insurance gave me two alternatives, Imvexxy and Estradiol. I tried both and neither worked – they caused burning and soreness that got increasingly worse, so had to stop using them. I am now in the process of appealing this to insurance, however if they won't consent to pay for Premarin ($498 a tube), though inconvenient, I will be searching for a Canadian pharmacy.

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I also have been taking Premarin happily for years, then suddenly, my insurance Blue Cross and their Pharmacy Express Scripts, denied coverage. They suggested i try Estradiol, but of course that would mean that I would have to go off Premarin, which I've been taking for 33 years. This would mean that at 81, I would suddenly be plunged into menopause. I work full time, travel, am happily married to a much younger many, am finishing my third book and my doctor told me that my health could be ruined by going off Premarin at my age. Why should I suddenly be condemned to an early death to save the drug companies money? Premarin may not be for everyone, but then why not find substitutes that prevent the ravages of menopause to older women allowing them to continue full lives? I notice that drug companies still pay for viagara. I'm in the process of finding a Canadian pharmacy with the full support of my doctor and I am beyond grateful to the Mayo Clinic for providing this forum.

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@jumbley39
Hi,
I am 80 and have been using vaginal estradiol twice a week for 3 years. I never experienced any menopausal or adverse effects. I was never on a hormone after an uneventful menopause…Just sharing my experience.

FL Mary

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@cherriann

Update: Insurance gave me two alternatives, Imvexxy and Estradiol. I tried both and neither worked – they caused burning and soreness that got increasingly worse, so had to stop using them. I am now in the process of appealing this to insurance, however if they won't consent to pay for Premarin ($498 a tube), though inconvenient, I will be searching for a Canadian pharmacy.

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I am curious to know what a Canadian pharmacy charges for a tube of Premarin. I recall being shocked some years ago when a tube of Premarin cost nearly $100. Subsequently, Estradiol was prescribed, and that's what I've been using twice a week since then, along with a pessary. I have had a problem with a sore and bleeding, but that has been attributed to the pessary.

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@luftmensh1

I am curious to know what a Canadian pharmacy charges for a tube of Premarin. I recall being shocked some years ago when a tube of Premarin cost nearly $100. Subsequently, Estradiol was prescribed, and that's what I've been using twice a week since then, along with a pessary. I have had a problem with a sore and bleeding, but that has been attributed to the pessary.

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I just read your response to my husband. He was appalled and kept saying "no, no, no!" I'm so sorry. I think a tube of Premarin is $42.00 at a Canadian pharmacy. One month supply of Premarin 0.45 mg is $202.00 at CVS and 90 day supply is $83.65 at the Canadian online pharmay.

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Amazing! The Canadilan system seems so much more rational and less greedy.

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It would be even better without the typo!

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I am 74 and have taken Premarin since age 31 (43+ years), which means that I have never had any chemistry change within my system. There are 3 chemistry issues within the body: thyroid, pancreas, and estrogen. The medical community balances the thyroid and pancreas (diabetes), but not estrogen. My doctor retired and I found only ONE doctor who was willing to prescribe an Estradiol patch for the next 12 months because she is retiring at that time. I have not seen any difference with the patch. I now find that there is an enormous problem for all of us who have taken estrogen for the long term, and the result of that problem is the lack of data and/or studies to guide or advise us as to what medical consequences, if any, we may suffer if we stop taking it after more than 30-50 years. An equally important problem is what options are there if we want to continue taking estrogen because we experienced a lifetime of excellent health? Taking Premarin for more than 43 years has prevented heart disease for me since it was a result of hereditary factors. At age 43, my cholesterol was almost 500 and at age 58, with the same cholesterol level, my triglycerides were 672. I have battled those scores for more than 40+ years and they are now in the normal ranges but I still have to monitor them. My bone density (June 2021) came in with a Z-score for the lumbar spine of 0.3, neck -0.1, and hip .04, and those scores are compared to the bone mass of a 30 year old adult, the lower the number, the greater loss of bone. I have been medically diagnosed as "frozen in time" to a young/middle-aged women because of long term use of Premarin and statins. I had a normal mammogram in June 2021. The problems are "(1) what to do if I/we can't continue getting the prescription for estrogen, and (2) if hospitalization won't continue coverage." I believe going public with our "specific group of long term estrogen users" is the only way to bring these problems to the attention of the medical and pharmaceutical communities. They must work on finding a healthy solution, including producing data and studies, for our "long term estrogen group," a group that no one acknowledges or even knows exists.

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@donna393

I am 74 and have taken Premarin since age 31 (43+ years), which means that I have never had any chemistry change within my system. There are 3 chemistry issues within the body: thyroid, pancreas, and estrogen. The medical community balances the thyroid and pancreas (diabetes), but not estrogen. My doctor retired and I found only ONE doctor who was willing to prescribe an Estradiol patch for the next 12 months because she is retiring at that time. I have not seen any difference with the patch. I now find that there is an enormous problem for all of us who have taken estrogen for the long term, and the result of that problem is the lack of data and/or studies to guide or advise us as to what medical consequences, if any, we may suffer if we stop taking it after more than 30-50 years. An equally important problem is what options are there if we want to continue taking estrogen because we experienced a lifetime of excellent health? Taking Premarin for more than 43 years has prevented heart disease for me since it was a result of hereditary factors. At age 43, my cholesterol was almost 500 and at age 58, with the same cholesterol level, my triglycerides were 672. I have battled those scores for more than 40+ years and they are now in the normal ranges but I still have to monitor them. My bone density (June 2021) came in with a Z-score for the lumbar spine of 0.3, neck -0.1, and hip .04, and those scores are compared to the bone mass of a 30 year old adult, the lower the number, the greater loss of bone. I have been medically diagnosed as "frozen in time" to a young/middle-aged women because of long term use of Premarin and statins. I had a normal mammogram in June 2021. The problems are "(1) what to do if I/we can't continue getting the prescription for estrogen, and (2) if hospitalization won't continue coverage." I believe going public with our "specific group of long term estrogen users" is the only way to bring these problems to the attention of the medical and pharmaceutical communities. They must work on finding a healthy solution, including producing data and studies, for our "long term estrogen group," a group that no one acknowledges or even knows exists.

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I'm so glad that you posted this. As I posted before, I have been taking Premarin or its equivalent since 1988 and am now 81. After Express Scripts (Blue Cross Blue Shiedl) suddenly stopped covering Premarin. I found a new gynecologist who says he believes that women should be in control of their health care decisions and that while the only concern is blood clots, stopping Premarin, would trigger menopause and could result in very adverse health risks for me. Based on his factual information, he prescribed Premarin at a slightly lower dose 0.3. I am paying $202 every month and waiting for my Canadian online pharmacy to delivery Premarin at a much more reasonable rate of $87 for a three month supply. I am absolutely terrified that I will be cut off and plunged into the unknowns of menopause in my 80's. Express Scripts sent a form asking me to show reasons why they should cover my prescription of Premarin. I think I will forward these excellent posts.

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@donna393

I am 74 and have taken Premarin since age 31 (43+ years), which means that I have never had any chemistry change within my system. There are 3 chemistry issues within the body: thyroid, pancreas, and estrogen. The medical community balances the thyroid and pancreas (diabetes), but not estrogen. My doctor retired and I found only ONE doctor who was willing to prescribe an Estradiol patch for the next 12 months because she is retiring at that time. I have not seen any difference with the patch. I now find that there is an enormous problem for all of us who have taken estrogen for the long term, and the result of that problem is the lack of data and/or studies to guide or advise us as to what medical consequences, if any, we may suffer if we stop taking it after more than 30-50 years. An equally important problem is what options are there if we want to continue taking estrogen because we experienced a lifetime of excellent health? Taking Premarin for more than 43 years has prevented heart disease for me since it was a result of hereditary factors. At age 43, my cholesterol was almost 500 and at age 58, with the same cholesterol level, my triglycerides were 672. I have battled those scores for more than 40+ years and they are now in the normal ranges but I still have to monitor them. My bone density (June 2021) came in with a Z-score for the lumbar spine of 0.3, neck -0.1, and hip .04, and those scores are compared to the bone mass of a 30 year old adult, the lower the number, the greater loss of bone. I have been medically diagnosed as "frozen in time" to a young/middle-aged women because of long term use of Premarin and statins. I had a normal mammogram in June 2021. The problems are "(1) what to do if I/we can't continue getting the prescription for estrogen, and (2) if hospitalization won't continue coverage." I believe going public with our "specific group of long term estrogen users" is the only way to bring these problems to the attention of the medical and pharmaceutical communities. They must work on finding a healthy solution, including producing data and studies, for our "long term estrogen group," a group that no one acknowledges or even knows exists.

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Hello @donna393 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I can see this is of great concern to you for many reasons. I am so glad that @jumbley39 can relate to your experience and has quickly responded to you.

I'm curious what your current doctor, who is retiring soon, shared with you regarding her thoughts and recommendations for how to manage this concern going forward after the 12-month Rx is up?

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@jumbley39

I'm so glad that you posted this. As I posted before, I have been taking Premarin or its equivalent since 1988 and am now 81. After Express Scripts (Blue Cross Blue Shiedl) suddenly stopped covering Premarin. I found a new gynecologist who says he believes that women should be in control of their health care decisions and that while the only concern is blood clots, stopping Premarin, would trigger menopause and could result in very adverse health risks for me. Based on his factual information, he prescribed Premarin at a slightly lower dose 0.3. I am paying $202 every month and waiting for my Canadian online pharmacy to delivery Premarin at a much more reasonable rate of $87 for a three month supply. I am absolutely terrified that I will be cut off and plunged into the unknowns of menopause in my 80's. Express Scripts sent a form asking me to show reasons why they should cover my prescription of Premarin. I think I will forward these excellent posts.

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I am 75 and have been using an HRT since 55. I use the Estradiol pill at a cost of $7.50 for a 90 day supply from Publix. Could you switch from Premarin to Estradiol?

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@amandajro

Hello @donna393 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I can see this is of great concern to you for many reasons. I am so glad that @jumbley39 can relate to your experience and has quickly responded to you.

I'm curious what your current doctor, who is retiring soon, shared with you regarding her thoughts and recommendations for how to manage this concern going forward after the 12-month Rx is up?

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Hi, thanks for your response. My doctor's form letter that we received, listed 5 doctors that we could contact. That gives me about 12 months to find someone who will give a 74 year old woman an estrogen prescription. I believe that is going to be a needle in a haystack but have started looking around. For me personally, my excellent long term health depends on getting a prescription but I find it funny that most doctors who would be likely to give me a prescription, are around my age and they all are retiring. Further, I think my medical situation is something that younger doctors are not familiar with and I don't think they want to jeopardize their medical license prescribing estrogen to a 74 year old women. I don't think the medical community is fully aware of how many senior citizen women are taking estrogen. However, given this enormous task, I am ready for the challenge.

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