Podcast entitled Health Consequences of Hearing Loss

Posted by imallears @imallears, Apr 11, 2019

Hi all,

I watched the above mentioned captioned podcast today and left a comment. It was listed on the daily digest. If you view it I would like feedback on my comments and what you thought about it in general.

Regards from Florida Mary

@imallears I couldn't find it will try again I found out I have nerve damage Dr gave me ear exercises to do but that's not going to help the nerve does anyone have any info on nerve damage in 👂?

REPLY

@lioness
Hi, In the search area at the top of the Mayo Clinic Page , type in Health Consequences of hearing loss. This will take you to my post. Right under that is the Newsfeed . Click on that and it will bring you to the podcast.

Regards from Mary….FL….hot….

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@imallears Hi I read the article on hearing loss , couldn't find your post but mine is a damaged auditory nerve Dr gave me ear exercises to do .Going to see him on 15th As I read it I think mine maybe from firearms my hubby and I hunted and Target practice being from Pa we snowmobiled also motorcycles I think this is what took a toll on my hearing 😞

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I find it interesting that your doctor told you that you had nerve damage. I wonder what kind of testing and evaluation was done. I've met many people who were told by medical doctors that they had 'nerve damage' that caused their hearing loss, and further told them that nothing could be done to help them. I am one of those people. I received that information from ENT specialists in 1963. I lived with progressive hearing loss for 15 years after that diagnosis before I even tried hearing aids. When I finally became desperate enough to try anything, I found that hearing aids did help. They didn't correct the problem, but they made a difference, and kept me in the hearing world! In time I learned that hearing aids used with other hearing assistive technology helped even more. (Hearing loops, FM systems, direct audio input and now BlueTooth devices.) My sensorineural hearing loss continued to deteriorate over time, and eventually I had a cochlear implant which gave me back my life! Noise damage is what causes most sensorineural hearing loss. It destroys the hair cells in the cochlea/inner ear. In fact, statistics show that veterans returning from combat zones have a very high incidence of noise induced hearing loss. Rock music without ear plugs is also a culprit, as is noise from just about every power tool on the planet. The bottom line here is that in most incidences, it's the cochlea that is damaged; not the auditory nerve. The cochlea is the part of the inner ear that connects with the auditory nerve to let the brain know what you're hearing. So, if there is damage to the cochlea that makes it difficult or impossible to stimulate that auditory nerve, hearing loss is the result. The degree of hearing loss is related to the hair cells that are damaged. Not all of them go down at once, so you continue to hear in some frequencies. It's likely your noise induced hearing loss has damaged your cochlea/inner ear, not the auditory nerve. However, that is what was believed by many in the medical field a few decades ago. Good Luck. Think positive as there is help out there but you have to find the right answers and the right professional help.

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@julieo4

I find it interesting that your doctor told you that you had nerve damage. I wonder what kind of testing and evaluation was done. I've met many people who were told by medical doctors that they had 'nerve damage' that caused their hearing loss, and further told them that nothing could be done to help them. I am one of those people. I received that information from ENT specialists in 1963. I lived with progressive hearing loss for 15 years after that diagnosis before I even tried hearing aids. When I finally became desperate enough to try anything, I found that hearing aids did help. They didn't correct the problem, but they made a difference, and kept me in the hearing world! In time I learned that hearing aids used with other hearing assistive technology helped even more. (Hearing loops, FM systems, direct audio input and now BlueTooth devices.) My sensorineural hearing loss continued to deteriorate over time, and eventually I had a cochlear implant which gave me back my life! Noise damage is what causes most sensorineural hearing loss. It destroys the hair cells in the cochlea/inner ear. In fact, statistics show that veterans returning from combat zones have a very high incidence of noise induced hearing loss. Rock music without ear plugs is also a culprit, as is noise from just about every power tool on the planet. The bottom line here is that in most incidences, it's the cochlea that is damaged; not the auditory nerve. The cochlea is the part of the inner ear that connects with the auditory nerve to let the brain know what you're hearing. So, if there is damage to the cochlea that makes it difficult or impossible to stimulate that auditory nerve, hearing loss is the result. The degree of hearing loss is related to the hair cells that are damaged. Not all of them go down at once, so you continue to hear in some frequencies. It's likely your noise induced hearing loss has damaged your cochlea/inner ear, not the auditory nerve. However, that is what was believed by many in the medical field a few decades ago. Good Luck. Think positive as there is help out there but you have to find the right answers and the right professional help.

Jump to this post

julio4 I'm sorry I should have stated I was sent to a specialist that tested me it was. ,2hr test and my Dr said the findings where nerve damage it is in my right ear He told me to do the ear exercises I'm seeing him on the 15 th I never had ear infections so that's all I can attribute it to ,will see Originally I had dizziness and balance problems but now the vertigo is cleared up I do wear hearing aids in both ears ,right is worse

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@lioness

julio4 I'm sorry I should have stated I was sent to a specialist that tested me it was. ,2hr test and my Dr said the findings where nerve damage it is in my right ear He told me to do the ear exercises I'm seeing him on the 15 th I never had ear infections so that's all I can attribute it to ,will see Originally I had dizziness and balance problems but now the vertigo is cleared up I do wear hearing aids in both ears ,right is worse

Jump to this post

@ lioness
Hi, Did the specialist administer an Auditory Brainstem Response test…what they call an ABR where electrodes are attached to your head.? That is the only way I know of to diagnose auditory nerve damage. Vertigo and dizziness are some of the symptoms of auditory nerve damage. I don’t think there is any surgery to fix that nerve. Can’t imagine what ear exercises would help that.
As julio4 said, you probably do have sensioneural loss which is benefited by hearing aids.
Keep us posted.

Also, in regards to that podcast…if you log on to the forum and see the page that lists all the groups…further on down you’ll see a Newsfeed area …I was able to view it there and also in the search area (magnifying glass Icon) on top of page.

Regards from Florida Mary

REPLY
@lioness

@imallears I couldn't find it will try again I found out I have nerve damage Dr gave me ear exercises to do but that's not going to help the nerve does anyone have any info on nerve damage in 👂?

Jump to this post

Hi @lioness and @imallears, here is the link to the podcast from Mayo Clinic Radio

Pages > Podcasts > Health Consequences of Hearing Loss > https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/podcasts/newsfeed-post/health-consequences-of-hearing-loss/

All podcasts are also videotaped and can be found here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/podcasts/
Click +Follow to subscribe to upcoming podcasts.
All podcasts include closed captioning. Click the [CC] icon in the bottom right to turn on the closed captioning.

REPLY
@imallears

@ lioness
Hi, Did the specialist administer an Auditory Brainstem Response test…what they call an ABR where electrodes are attached to your head.? That is the only way I know of to diagnose auditory nerve damage. Vertigo and dizziness are some of the symptoms of auditory nerve damage. I don’t think there is any surgery to fix that nerve. Can’t imagine what ear exercises would help that.
As julio4 said, you probably do have sensioneural loss which is benefited by hearing aids.
Keep us posted.

Also, in regards to that podcast…if you log on to the forum and see the page that lists all the groups…further on down you’ll see a Newsfeed area …I was able to view it there and also in the search area (magnifying glass Icon) on top of page.

Regards from Florida Mary

Jump to this post

@imallears Yes the specialist for the ear did use a new thing look like a virtual reality headset hooked up to computer that read my eye movements video my eye as I turned my eyes to follow the dot ,up and down also all around then balance testing close eyes ,stand on ,1ft then other and some other stuff it was pretty comprehensive

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@colleenyoung

Hi @lioness and @imallears, here is the link to the podcast from Mayo Clinic Radio

Pages > Podcasts > Health Consequences of Hearing Loss > https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/podcasts/newsfeed-post/health-consequences-of-hearing-loss/

All podcasts are also videotaped and can be found here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/podcasts/
Click +Follow to subscribe to upcoming podcasts.
All podcasts include closed captioning. Click the [CC] icon in the bottom right to turn on the closed captioning.

Jump to this post

@colleenyoung Thank you I couldn't find it before I did sign up for podcast

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