New to Afib, warfarin and metoprolol (beta blocker)

Posted by debbee @debbee, Sep 4, 2016

Hello – I’m an otherwise healthy 55 year old female, diagnosed with afib 1.5 years ago. The dr. that diagnosed it immediately prescribed warfarin and metoprolol. My regular dr. was away at the time, and when she returned 3 months later, she said “I probably would have only put you on aspirin” – because I am otherwise healthy. No other risk of stroke, my bp is fine, blood sugar is fine, no history of heart attack, etc. But she decided to run the tests and try to determine my afib trigger, so I have since had an echo to check my heart’s mechanical health (its good), sleep apnea test (I have mild, and am now on a device that treats it), and I’ve quite drinking alcohol. I saw an internist that decided I had alcohol induced afib. However, I suspect that my afib may also be triggered by hormone fluctuations caused by the peri-menopause I’m going through, but every dr. I’ve suggested it to says probably not, hard to prove. Ever since I was put on the 2 meds, I have been asking to get off them. “My” dr. wanted me to go through all the tests, and then decide. I live in a small remote town, and “my” dr. only works half time, so I am constantly seeing a new dr. The last new dr. I had basically said I have no choice but to stay on the drugs. She actually said the words “why do you want to get off the meds”. I’m still flabbergasted. I’ve refused to go back and see that one. I have an appt. this week with yet another dr. to review my sleep apnea results, and maybe since it’s under control, I will be able to get off the warfarin. But what about the beta blocker? Has anyone every been on warfarin and a beta blocker, and then been able to get off both of them?
I HATE being on these meds. But obviously I don’t want a stroke either.

Liked by wandamiller

@jmgm

Hello I am about to go on warfarin for a month and have cardioversion for afib

Has anyone had cardioversion?

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Hello
How long did
the successful cardioversion results last?

Is it risky? U was told that the procedure is calculated by computer
Was there a cardiologist attending your cardioversion?
Any info is appreciated
ThAnk you

@jackj

I certainly sympathize. I’m on metoprolol and Eliquis and i resisted both. All my doctors say they’re low dose amounts, that i am at risk because of heart disease ( i had bypass surgery), and of course they believe meds are downright good for you. I finally went on metoprolol but at half dose. And i’m continuing to study, thru diet or lifestyle changes, how i can safely eliminate them. Your situation sounds better than mine so i’m sure there’s a solution for you. But it will require a change in doctors.

Visit the websites for the doctors wolfson and dr sinatra (Google them). They present alternatives. Jack Juraco

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the websites for the doctors wolfson and dr sinatra (Google them).
I need first name and what state?

@jmgm

Hello I am about to go on warfarin for a month and have cardioversion for afib

Has anyone had cardioversion?

Jump to this post

The first cardioversion lasted apx 3 yrs, the second one, about 2 yrs, the third one did not work, so the doctors tried medication, which worked after trying a number of combinations, and several days in the hospital to monitor the outcome. Yes, I had an EP doctor with many years experience, during each procedure. I have been in sinus rhythm since late April, and hoping that it will continue.

Hello @jmgm,

Welcome back! My sincere apologies for the late reply, but your message slipped past me!
I see that you posted on Mayo Clinic Connect back in 2012, and we are so happy that you’ve returned to this group.

To answer your questions, I’d like to start by encouraging you to read and, if you wish, join in these discussions as you work to manage a-fib and consider cardioversion:

– AFib questions http://mayocl.in/29iD8aJ
– Should I consider ablation? http://mayocl.in/28ReaNr
– Afib after ablation http://mayocl.in/2sI4Vgs

Meanwhile, I’m also tagging @vermontrob @darrellb @2880 @grandmajan @predictable @murryone @twptrustrek and @martishka on this message so that they can share their experiences with you.

Should you wish to get a second opinion from Mayo Clinic, here is a link with all the contact information: http://mayocl.in/1mtmR63
@jmgm, may I ask if you could share a few more details? How are you managing the a-fib, currently?

@debbee – Seems like no one has addressed your mention of sleep apnea. Although mild, I want to encourage you to take that as serious as the other things you mention. I believe that apnea is a silent (pardon the pun) killer since it is responsible for so many other health conditions that either cause or exasperate these other conditions (high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, etc.) After go through a sleep test in the hospital over 15 years ago and going over the results with the sleep doctor it reminded me of an old Woody Allen movie about all the cells dressed in white responding to an alarm about another issue… Each time we have a bout of apnea our system recognizes that we stopped breathing and the alarm goes off. This alarm is adrenalin and it shoots cortisol into our system so we take a breath. The havoc on our system repeatably being shocked this way is responsible for the myriad of other serious health issues. I want to encourage you and all Connect readers to take Sleep Apnea very serious and not blow it off. On the other side, another wonderful benefit is that my spouse sleeps well and she even says that the low sound of air she hears is very soothing to her.

@jmgm

Hello I am about to go on warfarin for a month and have cardioversion for afib

Has anyone had cardioversion?

Jump to this post

Hi did u have a cardiologist present during cardioversion and we’re u on blood thinner wen u had CV done?

@thankful

@debbee – Seems like no one has addressed your mention of sleep apnea. Although mild, I want to encourage you to take that as serious as the other things you mention. I believe that apnea is a silent (pardon the pun) killer since it is responsible for so many other health conditions that either cause or exasperate these other conditions (high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, etc.) After go through a sleep test in the hospital over 15 years ago and going over the results with the sleep doctor it reminded me of an old Woody Allen movie about all the cells dressed in white responding to an alarm about another issue… Each time we have a bout of apnea our system recognizes that we stopped breathing and the alarm goes off. This alarm is adrenalin and it shoots cortisol into our system so we take a breath. The havoc on our system repeatably being shocked this way is responsible for the myriad of other serious health issues. I want to encourage you and all Connect readers to take Sleep Apnea very serious and not blow it off. On the other side, another wonderful benefit is that my spouse sleeps well and she even says that the low sound of air she hears is very soothing to her.

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Hi @thankful, It’s been a while since our paths crossed. Did you know that there is now a Sleep Health group on Connect. Check it out here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/sleep-health/
I think you might like to contribute to the discussions about sleep apnea.

Hope you’re having a good summer.

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