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Parus
@parus

Posts: 1286
Joined: Jul 14, 2017

Music Helps Me

Posted by @parus, Oct 13, 2017

At times music can be helpful. I like the group Anthem Lights…A new discovery for me when I was perusing youtube. A Capella has always been my thing. I love to sing!!!!!

REPLY

Hi, @parus. This is a great idea to talk about music and how it can be helpful to us. A few other members here on Connect who come to mind that I think would have some thoughts on this are @hopeful33250, @paracat, @rosemarya, @windwalker, @jimhd, @sandytoes14 @sharlynn62, @rmftucker, @lighthouseceliac, @laurieann789, @peach414144 and @nanaof4.

How have you found music to be helpful to you?

music changes the entire body. the nerves, attitude, muscles relax, your body bounces to the rhythm, (even if only in your mind) old lyrics come into the mind and your thoughts change for the better. old events take over, good memories come back to mind and if you let it, a smile comes to your face and whether you want to or not there is an enjoyment even with the pains. we humans are very inventive. good wishes to all and with plenty of love. peach

@lisalucier

Hi, @parus. This is a great idea to talk about music and how it can be helpful to us. A few other members here on Connect who come to mind that I think would have some thoughts on this are @hopeful33250, @paracat, @rosemarya, @windwalker, @jimhd, @sandytoes14 @sharlynn62, @rmftucker, @lighthouseceliac, @laurieann789, @peach414144 and @nanaof4.

How have you found music to be helpful to you?

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Sometimes yes and sometimes no…depends on whether my physical pain will allow any type of stimulation-if this makes sense.

Music is very comforting for my husband who has Alzheimer and vascular dementia. I’ve noticed it seems to calm others in his Memory unit also when I play some for him. He is particularly fond of Polka Music and county, but I’ve discovered other genres also seem to work. He even whistled a couple times yesterday when we attended the program in the Commons area, a guitarist who sang and played the Classic Country and gospel music for about an hour. My husband used to whistle many tunes through the day, but hadn’t done that for over a year. It was so good to hear and see the lights in his eyes as he did that even though it wasn’t as vibrant as previously.

@rmftucker

Music is very comforting for my husband who has Alzheimer and vascular dementia. I’ve noticed it seems to calm others in his Memory unit also when I play some for him. He is particularly fond of Polka Music and county, but I’ve discovered other genres also seem to work. He even whistled a couple times yesterday when we attended the program in the Commons area, a guitarist who sang and played the Classic Country and gospel music for about an hour. My husband used to whistle many tunes through the day, but hadn’t done that for over a year. It was so good to hear and see the lights in his eyes as he did that even though it wasn’t as vibrant as previously.

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@rmftucker, Thank you for sharing. I am happy that you were able to enjoy a happy moment with your husband. We treasure those special memories.

My mom, with some dementia was able to be at a grandson’s wedding. She was pretty much dependent of a walker for back issues, and in much pain. She was able to be present at a grandson’s wedding. When the music started, mom wanted to get up and dance. For a while she was able to be ‘herself’. I have a beautiful photo of mom/with walker dancing with my son:-)
Thank you for the memory.
Hugs to you and your husband,
Rosemary

@rmftucker

Music is very comforting for my husband who has Alzheimer and vascular dementia. I’ve noticed it seems to calm others in his Memory unit also when I play some for him. He is particularly fond of Polka Music and county, but I’ve discovered other genres also seem to work. He even whistled a couple times yesterday when we attended the program in the Commons area, a guitarist who sang and played the Classic Country and gospel music for about an hour. My husband used to whistle many tunes through the day, but hadn’t done that for over a year. It was so good to hear and see the lights in his eyes as he did that even though it wasn’t as vibrant as previously.

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@rmftucker It’s amazing what the mind will do and what will trigger a memory. Thank you for sharing about your husband. Music gave both of you a gift, if only for a limited time. 🙂
Jen

@parus @rmftucker @peach414144 and others who benefit from music.

I’m a great believer in the power of music to change lives. For several years, I’ve been a volunteer for Therapy Choirs of Michigan. (TCM) I began volunteering with TCM after vocal cord surgery and my speech therapist’s recommendation that I sing in order to strengthen my vocal cords. At TCM I’ve seen folks with very serious brain injuries respond to music and singing.

Here is an inspring article from our local newspaper regarding one of our members, http://www.hometownlife.com/story/opinion/columnists/2017/08/09/inspiration-look-farmington-hills-listen-singing/104370448/.

There was recently a couple of articles in Neurology Now about singing,
– Tuned In: After a researcher approached a group of people with Parkinson’s disease to start a choir, a series of small miracles unfolded. http://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2016&issue=12050&article=00014&type=FullText
– Noise Makers: A choir for adults with neurologic conditions allows them to express their creative sides. http://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2017&issue=13040&article=00009&type=FullText

Let’s all keep music in our life and of course, keep singing!

Teresa

Music can heal. As a fellow musician, I’ve seen it happen.
Did you see these stories and videos about harmonica playing for lung conditions and to help lung transplant recipients?
– Harmonicas help transplant patients learn to breathe again http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/health/harmonicas-help-transplant-patients-learn-to-breathe-again/484088662
– Meet the Harmonicats: Using musical therapy for COPD http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20150404/MAGAZINE/304049957

Or how about this one about the Breathless Choir http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2016/philips-breathless-choir/
So inspiring.

Music has been my life since young childhood. My parents were musicians, Mom was an accomplished violinist, my older sister and I have degrees in music, and all of us 6 learned at least one instrument and sang in church choirs. I was a minister of music for 25 years, and enjoyed the variety of venues that are possible in churches. I’m now retired, but I still play the piano and lead worship for the Sunday evening service. I have a small grand piano that feels abandoned. My piano technician died recently from an out of the blue heart attack, so I may be doing more of the maintenance of the piano. Not my favorite job.

One of my cousins studied and practiced music therapy for many years. I had the joy (mostly joy) of teaching many piano students, from age 5 to 90. I love hearing from them as they pursue their own careers in music.

In my own experience, music meant a lot to me professionally, playing various instruments, directing choirs of all ages and abilities, writing music for whatever instruments happened to be available, and directing music departments. I think the most pleasure I receive is in playing the piano in front of appreciative audiences, who don’t hear a lot of acoustic music anymore. I think my favorite church service is Christmas Eve, when we sing carols and read Scripture. And I get to play for it.

Jim

@jimhd

Music has been my life since young childhood. My parents were musicians, Mom was an accomplished violinist, my older sister and I have degrees in music, and all of us 6 learned at least one instrument and sang in church choirs. I was a minister of music for 25 years, and enjoyed the variety of venues that are possible in churches. I’m now retired, but I still play the piano and lead worship for the Sunday evening service. I have a small grand piano that feels abandoned. My piano technician died recently from an out of the blue heart attack, so I may be doing more of the maintenance of the piano. Not my favorite job.

One of my cousins studied and practiced music therapy for many years. I had the joy (mostly joy) of teaching many piano students, from age 5 to 90. I love hearing from them as they pursue their own careers in music.

In my own experience, music meant a lot to me professionally, playing various instruments, directing choirs of all ages and abilities, writing music for whatever instruments happened to be available, and directing music departments. I think the most pleasure I receive is in playing the piano in front of appreciative audiences, who don’t hear a lot of acoustic music anymore. I think my favorite church service is Christmas Eve, when we sing carols and read Scripture. And I get to play for it.

Jim

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Jim, @jimhd

What a wonderful family legacy of music!! My favorite church service (musically) is Easter Sunday. I love to sing Christ the Lord is Risen Today. It really lifts me up!

Teresa

I saw this article in an Aphasia Foundation email. It is about strokes/aphasia and the power of singing. I thought you would all find it interesting.
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2011/12/26/144152193/singing-therapy-helps-stroke-patients-speak-again.
@jimhd @parus @rmftucker @peach414144 @sandytoes14 @rosemarya
Teresa

@hopeful33250

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. It’s a good article about a therapy that could change a lot of lives.

Jim

If it were not for music and art mixed with creating my own comic relief I would have abandoned ship long ago. Chronic pain and treatment resistant major depression and other indispositions can be drudgery. I try to view things as a challenge. There are times I am not into taking on the challenge and it is okay.

@parus

If it were not for music and art mixed with creating my own comic relief I would have abandoned ship long ago. Chronic pain and treatment resistant major depression and other indispositions can be drudgery. I try to view things as a challenge. There are times I am not into taking on the challenge and it is okay.

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Hello @parus

Thank you for sharing your insights.

Teresa

@peach414144

music changes the entire body. the nerves, attitude, muscles relax, your body bounces to the rhythm, (even if only in your mind) old lyrics come into the mind and your thoughts change for the better. old events take over, good memories come back to mind and if you let it, a smile comes to your face and whether you want to or not there is an enjoyment even with the pains. we humans are very inventive. good wishes to all and with plenty of love. peach

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@peach414144, I just saw a youtube video on Facebook yesterday; it showed an elderly woman with Alzheimers. She could not speak and would tap her hand non-stop on the arm of her chair. A kindly woman visited her and sang ‘Yes, Jesus loves me’, and the woman with Alzheimers started enthusiastically keeping beat with her hand. It was pretty moving.

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