Music Helps Me

Posted by Parus @parus, Oct 13, 2017

At times music can be helpful. I like the group Anthem Lights…A new discovery for me when I was perusing youtube. A Capella has always been my thing. I love to sing!!!!!

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If it were not for music and art mixed with creating my own comic relief I would have abandoned ship long ago. Chronic pain and treatment resistant major depression and other indispositions can be drudgery. I try to view things as a challenge. There are times I am not into taking on the challenge and it is okay.

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@parus

If it were not for music and art mixed with creating my own comic relief I would have abandoned ship long ago. Chronic pain and treatment resistant major depression and other indispositions can be drudgery. I try to view things as a challenge. There are times I am not into taking on the challenge and it is okay.

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Hello @parus

Thank you for sharing your insights.

Teresa

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@peach414144

music changes the entire body. the nerves, attitude, muscles relax, your body bounces to the rhythm, (even if only in your mind) old lyrics come into the mind and your thoughts change for the better. old events take over, good memories come back to mind and if you let it, a smile comes to your face and whether you want to or not there is an enjoyment even with the pains. we humans are very inventive. good wishes to all and with plenty of love. peach

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@peach414144, I just saw a youtube video on Facebook yesterday; it showed an elderly woman with Alzheimers. She could not speak and would tap her hand non-stop on the arm of her chair. A kindly woman visited her and sang ‘Yes, Jesus loves me’, and the woman with Alzheimers started enthusiastically keeping beat with her hand. It was pretty moving.

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@rmftucker

Music is very comforting for my husband who has Alzheimer and vascular dementia. I’ve noticed it seems to calm others in his Memory unit also when I play some for him. He is particularly fond of Polka Music and county, but I’ve discovered other genres also seem to work. He even whistled a couple times yesterday when we attended the program in the Commons area, a guitarist who sang and played the Classic Country and gospel music for about an hour. My husband used to whistle many tunes through the day, but hadn’t done that for over a year. It was so good to hear and see the lights in his eyes as he did that even though it wasn’t as vibrant as previously.

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@rosemarya That was a beautiful story, Rosemary.

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I went Christmas caroling in my neighborhood ten days ago. I had not done that since I was a child. I could not hold the high notes very long due to very little lung function and chilly night air. I had a blast! Just grateful that the professional singers that were with us were able to drown out my crackling singing.

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@windwalker

I went Christmas caroling in my neighborhood ten days ago. I had not done that since I was a child. I could not hold the high notes very long due to very little lung function and chilly night air. I had a blast! Just grateful that the professional singers that were with us were able to drown out my crackling singing.

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@windwalker Terri: No doubt you were just great! I’m sure you made a joyful noise and it helped you as well. That is definitely a win-win experience.

Teresa

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@peach414144

music changes the entire body. the nerves, attitude, muscles relax, your body bounces to the rhythm, (even if only in your mind) old lyrics come into the mind and your thoughts change for the better. old events take over, good memories come back to mind and if you let it, a smile comes to your face and whether you want to or not there is an enjoyment even with the pains. we humans are very inventive. good wishes to all and with plenty of love. peach

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hello windwalker, you hit the nail on the head. yes, music is so soothing for me (age 80) even just tapping to the beat. it is though you are part of something and are going along with it, as though you belong to it. especially when you hear music you have enjoyed in the past. memories become real again. the music is good for all people especially for older and infirmed . you are an understanding person and i thank you for this.

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@windwalker

I went Christmas caroling in my neighborhood ten days ago. I had not done that since I was a child. I could not hold the high notes very long due to very little lung function and chilly night air. I had a blast! Just grateful that the professional singers that were with us were able to drown out my crackling singing.

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@windwalker, and anyone reading this

Bravo!! To all of us with untrained voices!
Joy to the World and Fa La La La to all 🙂

Rosemary

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@rmftucker

Music is very comforting for my husband who has Alzheimer and vascular dementia. I’ve noticed it seems to calm others in his Memory unit also when I play some for him. He is particularly fond of Polka Music and county, but I’ve discovered other genres also seem to work. He even whistled a couple times yesterday when we attended the program in the Commons area, a guitarist who sang and played the Classic Country and gospel music for about an hour. My husband used to whistle many tunes through the day, but hadn’t done that for over a year. It was so good to hear and see the lights in his eyes as he did that even though it wasn’t as vibrant as previously.

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As an update to this previous post, I would like to add that yesterday as we were attending another music program at the Care center, my husband joined in singing some of the show tunes from the 50’s and 60’s that the guitarist was playing. He always enjoys the music programs and it brings out that smile and grin that is absent at other times. I try to be there when they are having a music program so he will go. If they ask if he wants to attend, he will say no. If I’m there, I just make the decision for him and he always enjoys them, including the snack following it.

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@windwalker

I went Christmas caroling in my neighborhood ten days ago. I had not done that since I was a child. I could not hold the high notes very long due to very little lung function and chilly night air. I had a blast! Just grateful that the professional singers that were with us were able to drown out my crackling singing.

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When my mother was diagnosed with a paralyzed vocal cord and had surgery to correct it, she was advised to join the choir at the Elder residence where my parents lived, as therapy. She enjoyed being part of the group, and it did help so she was able to speak above a whisper for the last 10 years of her life. Singing was the answer.

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@rmftucker

Music is very comforting for my husband who has Alzheimer and vascular dementia. I’ve noticed it seems to calm others in his Memory unit also when I play some for him. He is particularly fond of Polka Music and county, but I’ve discovered other genres also seem to work. He even whistled a couple times yesterday when we attended the program in the Commons area, a guitarist who sang and played the Classic Country and gospel music for about an hour. My husband used to whistle many tunes through the day, but hadn’t done that for over a year. It was so good to hear and see the lights in his eyes as he did that even though it wasn’t as vibrant as previously.

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Isn’t MUSIC considered the best for our quality of life now? Thought it tops art for most people… our whole body and mine responds to it. Comments, Agent Darien

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@rmftucker

I understand, it was my paralyzed vocal cord that drew me into singing with a therapy choir. Great prescription for wellness in so many ways!

Teresa

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