Kneeling with artificial knee

Posted by ellerbracke @ellerbracke, Dec 7, 2018

I have touched on this in other messages, but not in a focused manner. As an avid gardener, kneeling is essential for me. Almost 3 months after TKR, things are generally going very well. I have forced myself to get used to the weird, “ball bearing/metal” feeling in the knee by not avoiding, but embracing times when it can be pushed/bumped against surfaces (soft, like side of mattress while making bed, hard, as in kitchen cabinet doors while cooking), and I sense a semi-acceptance of the odd sensation. I know many/most people simply don’t do it or can’t do it… I’m looking for those who are as stubborn as I am and want to find out how you managed to ultimately feel normal-ish.

question on stem cells. After so many problems with tkr i tried stem cells. I did my homework. Be careful who you deal with, as it is the wild west out there. I first learned about stem cells from the Mayo Clinic and then found a local Dr who i trust who deals with and was trained by Regenexx. I checked Regenexx web site and notice their research. It was an option for me and i took it. Yes, it is expensive but after the initial procedure of taking stem cells from the hio and mixing it my blood i followed the instructions and laid around a few weeks. No pain pills etc. I was advised to give up tennis, which i did, and went back to golf. I have had PRP injected this last year which seems to take care of the arthritis. To be honest it has worked for me. I no longer wear the brace that i wore when i started the program. I love biking and when the weather is right, bike 10-15 miles a day . If you are thinking about it do your homework. Their are doctors, nurses, chiropractors etc out there doing stem cells for a good fee. Many Drs hold seminars and use stem cells that they purchase. Why would you want a babys cells in your body? Plus most times the cells are dead. My advice is to do your homework, check Mayo Clinic for their clips on stem cells and arthritis etc and Regenexx. I have noticed Regenexx published a list of insurance companies now paying for it to be done. I have seen this in Toledo.
Good luck, don't expect miracles. It takes time but it sure beats the alternative.

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Had a knee replacement nine months ago (January). When I kneel, i can feel the replacement and it hurts. Am I alone or is this normal?

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Hello @chigirl. You may notice I moved your discussion and combined it with an existing one titled, "Kneeling with artificial knee." I did this so members like @ellerbracke, @sakota, @cobweb, and others taking place in this discussion on this topic would have a chance to see your message and respond. If you are replying by email, I suggest clicking on VIEW & REPLY so you will be brought to the new location of your post and so that you can read through some of the posts already made as well.

@chigirl, when I had my knee replacement in 2006, I was advised not to kneel on it, but every surgeon has different philosophies based on what I have read on Connect. Personally, I don't do it because it is painful, and in all honesty, it weirds me out mentally. Luckily, I have a good left knee, so if kneeling is absolutely required, I use that knee to kneel and keep my right one up (imagine a proposal position). @chigirl, were you given any specific instructions on kneeling, or were you told you could do most things as long as they weren't too painful?

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@chigirl

Had a knee replacement nine months ago (January). When I kneel, i can feel the replacement and it hurts. Am I alone or is this normal?

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Hi @chigirl, I think you might not be alone. I think the recommendation by the surgeons after a knee replacement is no more kneeling down. I don't do much kneeling but there are times when I need to so I bought some really good kneepads for outside and I also use them in the house if I have to kneel down. I've used them once since I had my right knee replaced in April and they did cushion the knee where I didn't feel too different than normal and it wasn't painful.

Have you thought about getting some kneepads?

kneepads

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@johnbishop

Hi @chigirl, I think you might not be alone. I think the recommendation by the surgeons after a knee replacement is no more kneeling down. I don't do much kneeling but there are times when I need to so I bought some really good kneepads for outside and I also use them in the house if I have to kneel down. I've used them once since I had my right knee replaced in April and they did cushion the knee where I didn't feel too different than normal and it wasn't painful.

Have you thought about getting some kneepads?

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@JustinMcClanahan, @johnbishop, @chigirl : Initially I was gung-ho to find a way to kneel normally. Not happening. Yes, I can easily kneel on the TKR knee without support by hands as long as I keep the weight mostly on the tibia, not the knee cap itself, and don’t lean forward. I can even lean forward if I add some support with my hands. However, both versions don’t give me back my former ability to easily scrub floors behind the commode, or reach across a flower bed to pull weeds, or dust the lower shelf of deep bookcases, for example. So I’ve adopted Justin’s “proposal” position, limiting as it is. I do have knee pads, but most activities involving getting down on knees are quick up-down movements, kneeling for perhaps 30 seconds, then back up, moving on, down again. For that kneepads to me are bothersome. For now I’ve been working on strengthening my abs and back, so I can get away with doing some chores bent at the waist instead of kneeling, and keep that up for 1/2 to 3/4 of an hour. Poor substitute, but what can one do!?

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@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @chigirl. You may notice I moved your discussion and combined it with an existing one titled, "Kneeling with artificial knee." I did this so members like @ellerbracke, @sakota, @cobweb, and others taking place in this discussion on this topic would have a chance to see your message and respond. If you are replying by email, I suggest clicking on VIEW & REPLY so you will be brought to the new location of your post and so that you can read through some of the posts already made as well.

@chigirl, when I had my knee replacement in 2006, I was advised not to kneel on it, but every surgeon has different philosophies based on what I have read on Connect. Personally, I don't do it because it is painful, and in all honesty, it weirds me out mentally. Luckily, I have a good left knee, so if kneeling is absolutely required, I use that knee to kneel and keep my right one up (imagine a proposal position). @chigirl, were you given any specific instructions on kneeling, or were you told you could do most things as long as they weren't too painful?

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Hi Justin, I was not told anything about kneeling or not. That's why I was so surprised by it. Mostly just kneel on Sundays at communion. I am having a second tkr Oct. 30 and was hoping the next one would be better, but it doesn't sound like it.

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@johnbishop

Hi @chigirl, I think you might not be alone. I think the recommendation by the surgeons after a knee replacement is no more kneeling down. I don't do much kneeling but there are times when I need to so I bought some really good kneepads for outside and I also use them in the house if I have to kneel down. I've used them once since I had my right knee replaced in April and they did cushion the knee where I didn't feel too different than normal and it wasn't painful.

Have you thought about getting some kneepads?

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I hadn't thought of kneepads before your previous post. Thanks for putting in a link. I just may get those for the odd kneeling at home moments.🙂

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It is so helpful to hear others experience! Thank you!

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@chigirl

Hi Justin, I was not told anything about kneeling or not. That's why I was so surprised by it. Mostly just kneel on Sundays at communion. I am having a second tkr Oct. 30 and was hoping the next one would be better, but it doesn't sound like it.

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@chigirl – I've had two TKR's and I truly avoid kneeling anymore. My OS told me that the three most common problems he heard about were discomfort with kneeling, a clicking sound, and numbness around the area. I didn't get the clicking and on my first TKR, the numbness eventually went away. I expect it will with the 2nd one too – I'm just at about 8 months now. So… I felt like if all I ended up with was the kneeling discomfort, I was pretty fortunate. Other than kneeling, was your recovery from your first TKR fairly smooth?

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@chigirl

Hi Justin, I was not told anything about kneeling or not. That's why I was so surprised by it. Mostly just kneel on Sundays at communion. I am having a second tkr Oct. 30 and was hoping the next one would be better, but it doesn't sound like it.

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@chigirl I agree with the others, almost no one kneels comfortably after a knee replacement. If I have to I can for a short period. I do not in church, and at our church we walk up to the communion servier and do not kneel so that is not a problem.

@johnbishop Thanks for the suggestion for knee pads, they look great.
JK

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@debbraw

@chigirl – I've had two TKR's and I truly avoid kneeling anymore. My OS told me that the three most common problems he heard about were discomfort with kneeling, a clicking sound, and numbness around the area. I didn't get the clicking and on my first TKR, the numbness eventually went away. I expect it will with the 2nd one too – I'm just at about 8 months now. So… I felt like if all I ended up with was the kneeling discomfort, I was pretty fortunate. Other than kneeling, was your recovery from your first TKR fairly smooth?

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@debbraw: regarding the 3 major problems your OS mentioned: I think just about everyone can check the kneeling discomfort, unfortunately I can also check the clicking sound (which seems to be permanent, unfortunately). To balance those 2 strikes, my numbness totally went away within about 9 weeks post-surgery. Would have traded longer recovery from numbness for no clicking any day, though. Glad that both your TKR’s and recoveries went well.

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@ellerbracke

@debbraw: regarding the 3 major problems your OS mentioned: I think just about everyone can check the kneeling discomfort, unfortunately I can also check the clicking sound (which seems to be permanent, unfortunately). To balance those 2 strikes, my numbness totally went away within about 9 weeks post-surgery. Would have traded longer recovery from numbness for no clicking any day, though. Glad that both your TKR’s and recoveries went well.

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@ellerbracke – I hear you. I'm grateful to not have clicking, but I gotta say, I have read so many posts from people who are struggling with scar tissue and continuous pain that I believe even the clicking – as much an annoyance as it must be – would be a blessing compared to that. Maybe we are both fortunate!

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@debbraw

@chigirl – I've had two TKR's and I truly avoid kneeling anymore. My OS told me that the three most common problems he heard about were discomfort with kneeling, a clicking sound, and numbness around the area. I didn't get the clicking and on my first TKR, the numbness eventually went away. I expect it will with the 2nd one too – I'm just at about 8 months now. So… I felt like if all I ended up with was the kneeling discomfort, I was pretty fortunate. Other than kneeling, was your recovery from your first TKR fairly smooth?

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Well, of course had nothing to compare with but I was in the hospital seven days plus a rehab place for an additional two weeks. Then of course the usual twice a week outpatient rehab for a few months. But aside from the kneeling pain, a little numbness and occasional pain which must be just the muscles around the knee, yeah I think I'm doing good
. Hope you keep on doing well with both knees.🙂

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@chigirl

Well, of course had nothing to compare with but I was in the hospital seven days plus a rehab place for an additional two weeks. Then of course the usual twice a week outpatient rehab for a few months. But aside from the kneeling pain, a little numbness and occasional pain which must be just the muscles around the knee, yeah I think I'm doing good
. Hope you keep on doing well with both knees.🙂

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Hi @chigirl – I'm glad to hear you say you are doing good. At the same time, I've got to ask why they kept you in the hospital for 7 days. That seems like such a long hospital stay. Do you feel comfortable sharing more about the situation?

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Sure I'd share but I truely don't know why. Maybe the meds? I was on tylenol, tramadol and norco same as at home before surgery; or maybe because I would be home alone. Actually, aside from the great meals (lucked out) I remember almost nothing from the first week. It all felt like a three week hospital stay because rehab was a hospital bed and same meds. Sorry I know this isnt much help.

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