Managing Lifelong Mental Health as a Senior

Posted by georgette12 @georgette12, Jan 13, 2017

I have just started using this site so this is my first message.

I recently read this quote by a Mayo Clinic doctor and I wanted to share it with you,

"The present moment is all you can control, not what happened in the past. Although you can't turn back the clock on setbacks and disappointments, your past does not have to define you."— Edward T. Creagan, M.D.

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I started into my analytical mode and reined myself in to accept the moment. @hopeful33250 thank you for the reminder of living in the moment.

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@hopeful33250

I recently read this quote by a Mayo Clinic doctor and I wanted to share it with you,

"The present moment is all you can control, not what happened in the past. Although you can't turn back the clock on setbacks and disappointments, your past does not have to define you."— Edward T. Creagan, M.D.

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Hi, @hopeful33250 – If you feel comfortable, I'm wondering if you'd share a bit about what this quote from Dr. Creagan has meant for you personally?

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@parus

I started into my analytical mode and reined myself in to accept the moment. @hopeful33250 thank you for the reminder of living in the moment.

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@parus and @lisalucier,

Thank you both for your thoughts and questions about my posting of Dr. Creagan's words.

Last weekend I spoke at the Memorial Service for a friend from my church. I spoke of the many difficulties she had faced during her life. I also spoke of how we all are influenced by our difficulties and that these life experiences do define, to some extent, who we are to become, either in a positive or negative way.

I spoke to the fact that when we face difficult circumstances it can give us the "why me" attitude. I went on to say that if the "why me" attitude continues over a long period of time, it can lead to a rather hard exterior and a somewhat jaded approach to life. I then spoke of my friend who had turned her problems into stepping stones to be a more caring, giving person. Her career had been to nurture but that was also her lifestyle outside of the work environment. I quoted a verse in the Bible that stated that when we go through difficult times and we find the comfort of God in our life it causes us to want to carry that comfort on to others (2 Corinthians 1: 3- 4). I stated that I thought this was my friend's pathway in life (and I suppose mine as well).

When I read Dr. Creagan's words in a Mayo Newsletter this morning those thoughts came back to me.

I agree with you @parus, becoming inward to a point is good, to know where we came from and how it affected us. However, to allow it to control us will not be healthy. It is better, as you said to "live in the moment."

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@hopeful33250

@parus and @lisalucier,

Thank you both for your thoughts and questions about my posting of Dr. Creagan's words.

Last weekend I spoke at the Memorial Service for a friend from my church. I spoke of the many difficulties she had faced during her life. I also spoke of how we all are influenced by our difficulties and that these life experiences do define, to some extent, who we are to become, either in a positive or negative way.

I spoke to the fact that when we face difficult circumstances it can give us the "why me" attitude. I went on to say that if the "why me" attitude continues over a long period of time, it can lead to a rather hard exterior and a somewhat jaded approach to life. I then spoke of my friend who had turned her problems into stepping stones to be a more caring, giving person. Her career had been to nurture but that was also her lifestyle outside of the work environment. I quoted a verse in the Bible that stated that when we go through difficult times and we find the comfort of God in our life it causes us to want to carry that comfort on to others (2 Corinthians 1: 3- 4). I stated that I thought this was my friend's pathway in life (and I suppose mine as well).

When I read Dr. Creagan's words in a Mayo Newsletter this morning those thoughts came back to me.

I agree with you @parus, becoming inward to a point is good, to know where we came from and how it affected us. However, to allow it to control us will not be healthy. It is better, as you said to "live in the moment."

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@teresa….beautifully said

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@hopeful33250

Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings about your friend, and what you learned from her life and death. Your words are profound and wise. I will remember what you've said here.

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Hello All:

Today a new series on Self-Kindness was initiated and I thought you might find it both helpful as well as enjoyable. Here is the link,
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/living-with-mild-cognitive-impairment-mci/newsfeed/practicing-self-kindness-part-1/
I invite you to take a minute and read this article and then pick one of the Deliberate Acts of Self-Kindness. I especially like point #7, write a thank-you note to yourself.

Would you share with me which act of self-kindness you pick?

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Hello All: As we begin this holiday season, for many of us it is not necessarily a happy time. Often times our families are not nearby or if they are they might not be our first choice of people to spend time with. Recently, one of our mentors, @retiredteacher, began a discussion on this topic.

Here is a link to that discussion, https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/holidays-are-not-happy-family-times-for-everyone/.

Take a look at Carol's initial post,

"This time of year from Halloween through New Year's is not a happy time for everyone. It is not for me and my husband because we have no family. All the adds and activities that show families around the table chatting and talking and enjoying all the special food and fellowship just make it worse. It's hard to have a glorious time because we've never experienced family tradition. I prepare traditional food, but there is no real celebration. I just want everyone to know that this time of year is not always what it's advertised to be. It also brings depression and hurt and a feeling of being left out. However, it's always been this way for my husband and me, so we are used to it. We don't buy each other gifts, but choose a needy child and buy for that child. We prepare donations for the food banks in our area and try to do what we can to help those who have a family but little else. I know there are other people like us, soI just wanted to remind others that not everyone has a family to celebrate with. Rather than the jolly, we celebrate the spiritual aspect and welcome a new year."

Carol has offered some personal examples of how she and her husband approach the holidays. What you are planning on doing?

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Hi all, thought members in this discussion might like to know that Mayo Clinic Connect has opened up a brand new group dedicated to COVID-19, https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/covid-19/. The hope is to help members connect and cope during these unprecedented times.

Please follow the COVID-19 group by clicking on +Follow, look at the discussions there and participate. You are also welcome to start a new discussion on any COVID-19-related topic you'd like to discuss.

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