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lsatenst1
@lsatenst1

Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 29, 2017

Ischemic stroke

Posted by @lsatenst1, Mar 29, 2017

I had a stroke in my brainstem caused by a blockage in my basilar artery, I had paralysis in my whole right side which went away, any one else have a stroke ?

Liked by Solo Act

REPLY

Hello @lsatenst1, welcome to Connect. This is a great place to connect with others and ask questions and learn. I have not had a stroke but would like to tag a few connect members to see if they are able to share their stories – @mkf1, @janicelm, @deliasanderson. I am also tagging @colleenyoung who may be able to add more.

In the mean time you may be able to find more helpful information on the Mayo Clinic page on ischemic strokes:
http://mayocl.in/1vWZ3Vm

John

@johnbishop

Hello @lsatenst1, welcome to Connect. This is a great place to connect with others and ask questions and learn. I have not had a stroke but would like to tag a few connect members to see if they are able to share their stories – @mkf1, @janicelm, @deliasanderson. I am also tagging @colleenyoung who may be able to add more.

In the mean time you may be able to find more helpful information on the Mayo Clinic page on ischemic strokes:
http://mayocl.in/1vWZ3Vm

John

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@lsatenst1, sorry the link I gave you was for strokes in general. Here is the one an ischemic stroke:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/stroke/diagnosis-treatment/treatment/txc-20117296

I also found some good information on the Merck Manual Consumer Version site here:
http://bit.ly/2nhB1I8 *if you click on the link at the top you can view the Professional Version for Doctors and Medical Students

The National Institute of Health’s site has some good illustrations (that help folks like me trying to learn what it is):
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/stroke/types

Thanks for the info, I am also starting to gain weight despite watching what I eat. One of the parts of my brain that has an infarct due to my stroke. Is my thalamus. There are those that say that it cause weight gain, but it is 8 mos since I had the stroke. Anyone have any thoughts ?

The good news is that you recognize you are starting to gain weight despite watching what you eat. I have struggled with eating all my life and it’s a daily battle changing my life style when it comes to food. It’s not easy going from “live to eat” to “eat to live”. What has helped my was reading a book while searching for answers for my autoimmune diseases – small fiber peripheral neuropathy (SFPN) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). I found a book written by Dr. Terry Wahls who suffers from multiple sclerosis (MS). She has an amazing story of how she was able to reduce the symptoms through nutrition. She still has MS but she went from being in a wheel chair to riding a bike which is pretty amazing in itself.

http://terrywahls.com/about/about-terry-wahls/

One thing I picked out of her diet that I do pretty regular – 4 or 5 days a week I have a “green” smoothie for breakfast. I alternate the fresh fruit and the greens used to make the smoothie – blueberries, strawberries, blackberries or whatever fresh ones I can find. For the greens I use kale, chard, spinach and sometimes arugula but I don’t like it as much. I add about 4 oz of unsweetened coconut water and 4 oz of regular water. It’s really not as bad as it might sound. The big surprise for me is after drinking the smoothie I can last until lunch time without going on the prowl for some snacks to get me to lunch.

John

@lsatenst1

Thanks for the info, I am also starting to gain weight despite watching what I eat. One of the parts of my brain that has an infarct due to my stroke. Is my thalamus. There are those that say that it cause weight gain, but it is 8 mos since I had the stroke. Anyone have any thoughts ?

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Hi @lsatenst1,
I add my welcome to John’s. I’d like to introduce you to two additional Connect members. Please meet @beachgal8 who also has experience with ischemic stroke. And @fekind who writes about her fiancé having insatiable hunger after having had a stroke. You can read more about each of them in these discussions on Connect:

– Let’s talk stroke prevention with Thomas Brott, M.D. http://mayocl.in/1sS5xvN
– Stroke survivor – always hungry http://mayocl.in/2kaB4Fk

Lsatenst, does hunger accompany your weight gain?

I had an ischemic stroke in october, whole left side was paralized, had tPa, at small hospital, then lights and sirens to fargo, nd, sanford, neurosurgeon removed blood clot out of my right basal ganglia, and stented my hundred percent blocked right carotid artery, HE SAVED MY LIFE, im so grateful. All my feeling and speech came back..

I think im on the wron g page

Hi @cinderella28,

We are so glad to have you join Connect, and even happier to know that that you are doing well after your stroke. You’ve landed in the right group, and I’m sure @lsatenst1 @beachgal8 and others will return to share their experiences with you.
I think you might be interested in watching this video Q&A with Dr. Brott, about strokes, too:
Let’s talk stroke prevention with Thomas Brott, M.D. http://mayocl.in/1sS5xvN

@cinderella28, I did see your message in the other discussion group, “Stroke survivor – always hungry” and also noticed you’re a good cook! Has the increased appetite ever been a problem for you?

Hi @lsatenst1, I have had ‘events’ but have not had a stroke. I am curious what your symptoms were prior to your stroke?

I really didn’t have any symptoms prior to the stroke that I recall. In fact, I didn’t know it was a stroke when it happened. I was sitting by the fireplace one morning and went to get up and sort of lost my balance and then my left side of my face, the left side of my waist, and my left foot all felt strange after that. So I went for tests and they said it was the stroke.

@beachgal8 how frightening! I wonder how many people dismiss symptoms?

@johnbishop

The good news is that you recognize you are starting to gain weight despite watching what you eat. I have struggled with eating all my life and it’s a daily battle changing my life style when it comes to food. It’s not easy going from “live to eat” to “eat to live”. What has helped my was reading a book while searching for answers for my autoimmune diseases – small fiber peripheral neuropathy (SFPN) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). I found a book written by Dr. Terry Wahls who suffers from multiple sclerosis (MS). She has an amazing story of how she was able to reduce the symptoms through nutrition. She still has MS but she went from being in a wheel chair to riding a bike which is pretty amazing in itself.

http://terrywahls.com/about/about-terry-wahls/

One thing I picked out of her diet that I do pretty regular – 4 or 5 days a week I have a “green” smoothie for breakfast. I alternate the fresh fruit and the greens used to make the smoothie – blueberries, strawberries, blackberries or whatever fresh ones I can find. For the greens I use kale, chard, spinach and sometimes arugula but I don’t like it as much. I add about 4 oz of unsweetened coconut water and 4 oz of regular water. It’s really not as bad as it might sound. The big surprise for me is after drinking the smoothie I can last until lunch time without going on the prowl for some snacks to get me to lunch.

John

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Hi Johnbishop. I am a connect member in some different areas, but they all seem to become interconnected. Do you happen to know if your smoothies can be used on a low residue diet? I am dealing with pseudo obstructions, and I am decompressing the bowel right now coming off a big shut down requiring an NG tube. Raw is not on the allowable food list in its normal form, but since I am blending cooked stuff to a liquid, can I blend raw stuff to a liquid as well? I want to access the nutritional value of raw, which I normally do on a day to day. I have to prevent residue in the bowel for a while, until it contracts back to normal.
Thank you for any information!
UPArtist

@johnbishop

The good news is that you recognize you are starting to gain weight despite watching what you eat. I have struggled with eating all my life and it’s a daily battle changing my life style when it comes to food. It’s not easy going from “live to eat” to “eat to live”. What has helped my was reading a book while searching for answers for my autoimmune diseases – small fiber peripheral neuropathy (SFPN) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). I found a book written by Dr. Terry Wahls who suffers from multiple sclerosis (MS). She has an amazing story of how she was able to reduce the symptoms through nutrition. She still has MS but she went from being in a wheel chair to riding a bike which is pretty amazing in itself.

http://terrywahls.com/about/about-terry-wahls/

One thing I picked out of her diet that I do pretty regular – 4 or 5 days a week I have a “green” smoothie for breakfast. I alternate the fresh fruit and the greens used to make the smoothie – blueberries, strawberries, blackberries or whatever fresh ones I can find. For the greens I use kale, chard, spinach and sometimes arugula but I don’t like it as much. I add about 4 oz of unsweetened coconut water and 4 oz of regular water. It’s really not as bad as it might sound. The big surprise for me is after drinking the smoothie I can last until lunch time without going on the prowl for some snacks to get me to lunch.

John

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Hi @upartist, I would like to bring some other Connect folks into the discussion to see if they know of others that may be better suited to answer your question. @kanaazpereira @dawn_giacabazi @kdubois @kariulrich do you have any thoughts you can add for UPArtist?

I think you would still be adding fiber into the diet even though the pieces would be smaller if blended into a smoothie. Occassionally I will add some left over cooked veggies into my breakfast smoothie.

Mayo Clinic does have some information on a low-fiber diet here: http://mayocl.in/2s1TdwR

Mayo has a YouTube video on the subject that may be helpful…
http://bit.ly/2tFBFU8

John

@johnbishop

The good news is that you recognize you are starting to gain weight despite watching what you eat. I have struggled with eating all my life and it’s a daily battle changing my life style when it comes to food. It’s not easy going from “live to eat” to “eat to live”. What has helped my was reading a book while searching for answers for my autoimmune diseases – small fiber peripheral neuropathy (SFPN) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). I found a book written by Dr. Terry Wahls who suffers from multiple sclerosis (MS). She has an amazing story of how she was able to reduce the symptoms through nutrition. She still has MS but she went from being in a wheel chair to riding a bike which is pretty amazing in itself.

http://terrywahls.com/about/about-terry-wahls/

One thing I picked out of her diet that I do pretty regular – 4 or 5 days a week I have a “green” smoothie for breakfast. I alternate the fresh fruit and the greens used to make the smoothie – blueberries, strawberries, blackberries or whatever fresh ones I can find. For the greens I use kale, chard, spinach and sometimes arugula but I don’t like it as much. I add about 4 oz of unsweetened coconut water and 4 oz of regular water. It’s really not as bad as it might sound. The big surprise for me is after drinking the smoothie I can last until lunch time without going on the prowl for some snacks to get me to lunch.

John

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Thank you John. That gave me good information.
Respectfully,
UPArtist

@johnbishop

The good news is that you recognize you are starting to gain weight despite watching what you eat. I have struggled with eating all my life and it’s a daily battle changing my life style when it comes to food. It’s not easy going from “live to eat” to “eat to live”. What has helped my was reading a book while searching for answers for my autoimmune diseases – small fiber peripheral neuropathy (SFPN) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). I found a book written by Dr. Terry Wahls who suffers from multiple sclerosis (MS). She has an amazing story of how she was able to reduce the symptoms through nutrition. She still has MS but she went from being in a wheel chair to riding a bike which is pretty amazing in itself.

http://terrywahls.com/about/about-terry-wahls/

One thing I picked out of her diet that I do pretty regular – 4 or 5 days a week I have a “green” smoothie for breakfast. I alternate the fresh fruit and the greens used to make the smoothie – blueberries, strawberries, blackberries or whatever fresh ones I can find. For the greens I use kale, chard, spinach and sometimes arugula but I don’t like it as much. I add about 4 oz of unsweetened coconut water and 4 oz of regular water. It’s really not as bad as it might sound. The big surprise for me is after drinking the smoothie I can last until lunch time without going on the prowl for some snacks to get me to lunch.

John

Jump to this post

If you’re near a Costco, they have a big bag with individual packages for smoothies that include kale, spinach, strawberries, blueberries, and blackberries. It’s important to have protein with the carbs. I add their veg-based vanilla protein powder and sliced 1/2 or full banana, and for the liquid, I use half almond milk, half water. I have a Vitamix, which really helps because I start with the frozen packages, but other strong blenders probably work, too. The brand is FreshStart, and it’s in the freezer row where frozen fruit is, too.

smoothies

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