Interesting discussion with new knee doctor yesterday!

Posted by bonniethompson1234 @bonniethompson1234, Sep 9 11:38am

I have had problems with my first knee replacement (right knee) which was done two and a half years ago. I will say it is finally feeling better.
New knee doctor gave me some help with answers to my many questions without my asking them. He did new X-rays on both knees as the left is bone on bone. He told me that part of my long surgery was the fact that more bone was removed due to osteoporosis and more metal used on both top and bottom of knee replacement. E watched me walk and feels that my gait is not just my bad knee but something more going on. It may be just my peripheral neuropathy but feels there might have been a minor stroke because being hospitalized for three day after surgery is not normal. He is sending me to a neurologist to have some things checked out before we continue talks about additional surgery. In the meantime, we will continue with gel injections and I will get my first next week after insurance is cleared. I probably should share this in the peripheral neuropathy group as well. Although the trip is an hour each way and it was rush hour coming back, my new doctor is definitely worth the trip.

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Joint Replacements group.

@bonniethompson1234 I am glad you found someone to thoroughly evaluate exactly what is happening.
Sue

REPLY
@sueinmn

@bonniethompson1234 I am glad you found someone to thoroughly evaluate exactly what is happening.
Sue

Jump to this post

Thank you. It’s a bit of a relief.

REPLY

Wow, that's wild. It makes me wonder how they found the right prosthesis for you, assuming they discovered the extent of your osteoporosis during surgery. I had a CT scan of my knee prior to surgery, and so the prosthesis was custom made from the CT scan. My surgeon also used the Mako robotic assistant and the prosthesis was also made by Mako. This doesn't mean a perfect fit, but it's close enough and I've had no problems.

It sounds like you may have more issues than just the knee as well.

Finally, you mentioned your left knee is bone on bone. So we're mine. I would suggest talking to a surgeon who uses Mako. Both of my surgeries and recoveries went well.

And please remember to exercise before the operation, and follow the PT afterward rigorously, especially the first 4 weeks.

All the best to you.

Joe

REPLY

Hi Joe, when did the neuropathy start, i have the same issue which started after TKR. I've been to 2 neurologist and can say neither have given me any satisfaction regarding the neuropathy- good luck.
Thanks
vince

REPLY

Mine happed right after surgery and know one will listen to me.

REPLY

Thank for sharing this. I know something is going on with this tkr. I am going on 8 months out and still in thearpy. Trying to get my leg straight, which to me seems in vain, not sure? I am wishing I had ne er had this done. I have changed Dr's. To a number 1 specialist in this field and it was his last day, I did not know this when I went. He has referred me to the one taking his place, very good Dr. Also. I am in awful pain. I have not taken a painmed in a long time,just had to. Had 2 clots already.

REPLY
@ammaw52

Thank for sharing this. I know something is going on with this tkr. I am going on 8 months out and still in thearpy. Trying to get my leg straight, which to me seems in vain, not sure? I am wishing I had ne er had this done. I have changed Dr's. To a number 1 specialist in this field and it was his last day, I did not know this when I went. He has referred me to the one taking his place, very good Dr. Also. I am in awful pain. I have not taken a painmed in a long time,just had to. Had 2 clots already.

Jump to this post

I am so, so sorry for all that you are going through with your knee replacement. About two years ago, I had my right knee replaced and my left knee is just as bad. It was recommended that I have that done also. My heart goes out to you for the stiffness and pain that you are suffering! I had the same problem with trying to get my leg straight and I was in PT for about 7-8 months. I had bad reactions to pain meds and could only take Tylenol. The pain was excruciating and like you, I just wish that I had never done it. To this day, my replaced knee does not feel as strong as it did before surgery. I continue to exercise at home with all of the exercises that I was given at PT and I think that *finally*, the surgical knee is starting to feel better. My surgeon at the New England Baptist Hospital told me that it is a full two years before the knee is completely healed. As of Sept 21st, it will be two years for me. My left knee is painful, but I just cannot imagine putting myself through a surgery like that again! I may have to, but for now, I am just going to try to *live with* the pain! Keep icing your knee every day and do constant bending and flexing of the knee several times a day. Wear a knee brace for support off and on…….not all the time, because you don’t want to get dependent on it. Keep stretching it as much as you can and constantly do quad exercises to improve the strength of your thighs to support your knee. All of my best wishes to you as you go through this………As my dr said to me “It is a very rough surgery”.
So, so true! Keep stretching every day.]
MaryAnn from Boston

REPLY
@vinran

Hi Joe, when did the neuropathy start, i have the same issue which started after TKR. I've been to 2 neurologist and can say neither have given me any satisfaction regarding the neuropathy- good luck.
Thanks
vince

Jump to this post

I had TKR also. I am so sorry for all that you are going through. It is such a rough surgery and very difficult recuperation.

REPLY
@mabfp3

I am so, so sorry for all that you are going through with your knee replacement. About two years ago, I had my right knee replaced and my left knee is just as bad. It was recommended that I have that done also. My heart goes out to you for the stiffness and pain that you are suffering! I had the same problem with trying to get my leg straight and I was in PT for about 7-8 months. I had bad reactions to pain meds and could only take Tylenol. The pain was excruciating and like you, I just wish that I had never done it. To this day, my replaced knee does not feel as strong as it did before surgery. I continue to exercise at home with all of the exercises that I was given at PT and I think that *finally*, the surgical knee is starting to feel better. My surgeon at the New England Baptist Hospital told me that it is a full two years before the knee is completely healed. As of Sept 21st, it will be two years for me. My left knee is painful, but I just cannot imagine putting myself through a surgery like that again! I may have to, but for now, I am just going to try to *live with* the pain! Keep icing your knee every day and do constant bending and flexing of the knee several times a day. Wear a knee brace for support off and on…….not all the time, because you don’t want to get dependent on it. Keep stretching it as much as you can and constantly do quad exercises to improve the strength of your thighs to support your knee. All of my best wishes to you as you go through this………As my dr said to me “It is a very rough surgery”.
So, so true! Keep stretching every day.]
MaryAnn from Boston

Jump to this post

Thank you for reply, I exercise daily. Stretch. Gravity exercises to straighten leg. I tried my knee brace and was told not to wear it. Because I wouldn't use .my muscles. I just can't see ever doing this again if my right knee got bad. I would do everything to avoid it. I amglad your knee is finally doing better. Maybe as time goes on mine will too. I sure hope so.

REPLY

I’ve been reading these posts for several weeks now. They’ve been encouraging at times, also depressing, but ultimately inspiring. I am 2 months out from TKR. I’ve experienced many of the expressed issues-pain, 7/10 a couple of nights, an allergic reaction to Hydrocodone, and disrupted sleep. For about six weeks I walked like a robot, throwing my stiff surgery leg out as I walked. I was, however, from my first PT visit, (the following day), able to flex 90 degrees and straighten nearly totally. I’m 75, was in pretty good shape and adhered religiously to the PT, twice a day, and icing frequently. A thing that helped with the stiffness was getting back on my stationary bike. At first I could only pedal back and forth, a few inches either way, then one day I made a complete revolution. What a profound moment that seemed! I’ve worked up to 30 minutes two times a day now. It has helped my gait become something close to normal. Tomorrow is my 2 month checkup. I hope to be able to get back onto my real bicycle after that.
One thing I think helped me was keeping a daily dairy. It helped recording the pain, itchy rash and weeks of 2-3 hours sleep, but also my small triumphs. I’ll refer to it when I have the other one done in January.
Best wishes to all of you. This is undoubtedly a tough surgery.

REPLY
@mabfp3

I had TKR also. I am so sorry for all that you are going through. It is such a rough surgery and very difficult recuperation.

Jump to this post

Yes TKR can be tough on some people. For those considering TKR, take time ahead of surgery to work with a trainer and get in shape. Not just legs but core and upper body. You'll need strong triceps after surgery, trust me.

And start the PT immediately after surgery. Nothing is more important. Lost time cannot be made up. First the PT will work on ROM and later on strengthening the quad and hamstring.

Best wishes to any and all contemplating TKR. For me, it's been life changing!

Joe

REPLY
@vinran

Hi Joe, when did the neuropathy start, i have the same issue which started after TKR. I've been to 2 neurologist and can say neither have given me any satisfaction regarding the neuropathy- good luck.
Thanks
vince

Jump to this post

Hi Vince. I didn't have neuropathy following my TKRs. Perhaps someone else here can offer advice?

Joe

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment