What is the correct range for blood pressure?

Posted by Tim R. @tymochtee, May 10, 2016

I am 65 and am interested in knowing what is the correct range for blood pressure. Every doctor seems to have their own scale; a neurologist wants it to be 120/70, my GP saying 135/85, I’ve read a 2014 study from a specialized group organized by the feds that says 150/90. What’s the standard for folks at 65 y.o.?

Liked by blanche1958

@tymochtee, I suggest you pay special attention to the material added here by @lynnkay1956, which is a standard public statement from the American Heart Association. This material has a crucial deficiency for me and, presumably, also for you. It pays no attention to age differences (just as most medical professionals), and as a result, they hound senior citizens into setting unrealistically low BP goals more suited to millennials. One result is prescriptions for medications that may not be needed. My advice is to downplay the information available from the Internet and neighborhood conversations; find a good nephrologist with a strong practice in treating hypertension, and follow his/her advice faithfully.

Liked by tennisplayer

REPLY

actually these are the recommendations my cardiologist gave me and I am 60. I also had my surgery in December at Mayo.

REPLY

@lynnkay1956, that’s fine for you individually. My point was that others should not accept the AHA chart on its face, because it has no allowance for age differences, which are crucial factors often pushed aside by the pharmaceutical industry.

REPLY

Blood pressure ideal numbers are under great conversation in the medical
community, my hubby learned in his just completed EMT training. I suspect
it is individual and depends on the doctor. I’d go with the primary, unless
most of your care is from a specialist. And, BP varies throughout the day,
so ask for a range.

REPLY

@diannecochran, you sent a message stating: "I have high blood pressure and want to know what BP should be."

Unfortunately, it's not as simple as saying normal is less than 120/80 Hg. As @predictable and @coladyrev mention, blood pressure readings fluctuate and what is "normal" will vary depending on your gender and age. Here is an article that helps to explain:
– Blood Pressure Readings Explained https://www.healthline.com/health/high-blood-pressure-hypertension/blood-pressure-reading-explained

Dianne, have you talked with your cardiologist about the target goal right for you?

REPLY
@colleenyoung

@diannecochran, you sent a message stating: "I have high blood pressure and want to know what BP should be."

Unfortunately, it's not as simple as saying normal is less than 120/80 Hg. As @predictable and @coladyrev mention, blood pressure readings fluctuate and what is "normal" will vary depending on your gender and age. Here is an article that helps to explain:
– Blood Pressure Readings Explained https://www.healthline.com/health/high-blood-pressure-hypertension/blood-pressure-reading-explained

Dianne, have you talked with your cardiologist about the target goal right for you?

Jump to this post

@diannecochran, you were fortunate to hear from Colleen Young at the outset of your quandary. She knows a lot, and she has given you the Internet address of a good Healthline article. Another Healthline report that may interest you is at https://www.healthline.com/health/high-blood-pressure-hypertension#overview and several following pages citing "everything" about hypertension. Be aware that your kidney may also be crucial to your blood pressure status. My medical care practice refers hypertensive people like me to kidney doctors (nephrologists) as soon as Stage 2 hypertension is found. From the two Healthline articles, you'll be alerted to crucial considerations that could drive your blood pressure up. Age is a factor that gradually raises the allowable maximum from the mid-60s up. The most important guidelines from cardiology and nephrology now aim at Stage 1 hypertension (139/89), Stage 2 (140+/90+), and "hypertensive crisis" (180+/120+). A single blood pressure reading at home, however high it is, needs confirmation with another reading — normally after 10-15 minutes (or sooner if it is in hypertensive crisis and a call to 911 might be wise). Treatment will depend on which of a dozen symptoms is caused by high blood pressure readings. If you would like to know more about my experience than the two Healthline articles provide, I'll gladly respond to questions and recruit some other Connect members to weigh in as well. Martin

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.