Has anyone tried the HF10 Spinal Cord Stimulation Device?

Posted by patrick17 @patrick17, Nov 21, 2018

Has anyone tried a device called HF10 ? It’s a device which stimulates your spinal cord to help relieve back and leg pain. After a trial period of about a week, if the patient is achieving good results the device is implanted in the person. My pain management doctor has recommended it to me for arm and hand nerve pain. I would like to hear from anyone who has used this device and especially from anyone who has used it for arm and hand pain. Thank you.

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@jfsherley

So sorry what is CRPS exactly ?

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Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. It usually happens in arms or legs. Mine started when my Work Comp adjuster refused to authorize a second fusion. It took two years of fighting before it was approved but by then a nerve running down my left leg was damaged.

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@glaciermom

Yes I still have one. The original reached it's time limit and another one was put in. And when that one was getting close it was replaced with a new state of the art one. I can now have MRI's and the technician is going to work with me next month to teach it to tell when I lay down and automatically turn down the stimulation.
I plan to have one always because I know what the nerve pain is like and do not want to feel it! I know a lot of the patients don't have patience enough to work with it and give up. It's not a one time inserted and all is well. It has to be adjusted quite a bit the first couple years but gets less and less. When I have something done surgically it has to be adjusted because it is very sensitive and can get out of whack. If I fall it has to be fixed again, things like that.
I have encouraged everyone who has come to me, to have one put in if the pain is so bad you can't control it.
I'm actually on my third doctor, the others have moved or retired. I'm like an old shoe that keeps hanging around.

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I have nerve pain and a couple of people came in my room at pain clinic and talked to me about one but I told them I was interested at that time but your testimony gives me hope the only thing about my pain though is that I’ve needed rods for long time and but the Drs won’t touch me because I smoke and I don’t want to be put under for 6 hrs … but my pain has been really bad lately so I don’t know something to think about for sure I like the fact that you can get MRI now that’s a big improvement ! I have to wear a brace and I’m not sure one of those would keep me from having to wear one

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@glaciermom

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. It usually happens in arms or legs. Mine started when my Work Comp adjuster refused to authorize a second fusion. It took two years of fighting before it was approved but by then a nerve running down my left leg was damaged.

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Oh ok , so sorry for your pain

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@bkruppa

My wife has chronic pain and considered a spinal implant device. After doing much research and talking to some doctors I found the following. There are older and newer model devices out there. The newer claim to work better even though the process of implant is the same so I'm not sure why the newer claims are better. Second is that there (according to a doctor) is a high re-implant rate in the first 5 years (20%) apparently to readjust the spinal implants. Third is there probably are no studies done on other parts of the body other than that of the spinal/back and leg. My wife's pain area was never studied so she would be the first to test these devices for her pain area. From what I've read pain in the arm areas was never mentioned. Finally I tried to get clinical study side affect data on more severe side affects like paralysis which a neighbor down the street from us incurred as a result of an implant procedure. None of the companies would provide such data. So I don't know how to view the probability of this severe side affect from occurring.

So while many have had success with these devices we decided not to go through this procedure due to the many unknowns at hand.

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Hello bkruppa, Let me tell you about my experiences with spinal cord stimulators. I had two surgeries on the toes of my right foot. One in 2016 and the other 2018 resulting in a painful stump neuroma in the toes. After consulting with a couple of pain management doctors who don't do SCS thought the only thing left was to try a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) also known I believe as neuroblation. There are three companies that make them. Boston Scientific (Medtronic), Nevro HF10 and Abbott, formerly St. Jude.
The pain management doctor who did the SCS, used the Boston Scientific model. After he explained the procedure, I decided to do the trial which lasted between 5 and 7 days. The two leads are inserted in the back and the battery (generator) is taped to your body. If you get at least 50% improvement they suggest that you get the permanent one, where the make a three inch slit in your lower back near your rump. I'm not sure if I got 50% but the doctor and the Boston Scientific representative convinced me I did. I decided to have the permanent one installed. Unbeknown to me the doctor who did the trial didn't do the permanent one. I was referred to one that did. I had no problem with the generator or leads. I did probably get 50% relief but with Boston Scientific, you do get parathesia, the tingling in the area of the pain. The rep tried to keep reprograming using a laptop and remote device. The tingling wasn't painful, just annoying to me. After two months I had it removed. Nom problem there either. Perhaps, I was too inpatient and should have gave it more time. That was about 2 years ago. I have since tried the 5 day trial with another doctor who used the Abbot DRG device with no luck. I've had many epidurals, RFA's and nerve blocks. Actually, I just had an epidural and MBB, medial branch block two days ago. So far, no relief, but I've been told it may take 3 to 7 days to kick in. If this doesn't work I may talk to the pain doctor about trying the NEVRO. The spinal cord stimulators are designed to block the pain from going to the brain. I've talked to a few people who had foot and leg pain and they got very significant pain relief from the Abbot DRG. I think sometimes the outcomes depends on the skill of the surgeon.

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@martyk

Hello bkruppa, Let me tell you about my experiences with spinal cord stimulators. I had two surgeries on the toes of my right foot. One in 2016 and the other 2018 resulting in a painful stump neuroma in the toes. After consulting with a couple of pain management doctors who don't do SCS thought the only thing left was to try a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) also known I believe as neuroblation. There are three companies that make them. Boston Scientific (Medtronic), Nevro HF10 and Abbott, formerly St. Jude.
The pain management doctor who did the SCS, used the Boston Scientific model. After he explained the procedure, I decided to do the trial which lasted between 5 and 7 days. The two leads are inserted in the back and the battery (generator) is taped to your body. If you get at least 50% improvement they suggest that you get the permanent one, where the make a three inch slit in your lower back near your rump. I'm not sure if I got 50% but the doctor and the Boston Scientific representative convinced me I did. I decided to have the permanent one installed. Unbeknown to me the doctor who did the trial didn't do the permanent one. I was referred to one that did. I had no problem with the generator or leads. I did probably get 50% relief but with Boston Scientific, you do get parathesia, the tingling in the area of the pain. The rep tried to keep reprograming using a laptop and remote device. The tingling wasn't painful, just annoying to me. After two months I had it removed. Nom problem there either. Perhaps, I was too inpatient and should have gave it more time. That was about 2 years ago. I have since tried the 5 day trial with another doctor who used the Abbot DRG device with no luck. I've had many epidurals, RFA's and nerve blocks. Actually, I just had an epidural and MBB, medial branch block two days ago. So far, no relief, but I've been told it may take 3 to 7 days to kick in. If this doesn't work I may talk to the pain doctor about trying the NEVRO. The spinal cord stimulators are designed to block the pain from going to the brain. I've talked to a few people who had foot and leg pain and they got very significant pain relief from the Abbot DRG. I think sometimes the outcomes depends on the skill of the surgeon.

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I forgot to add that since I tried the SCS Boston Scientific, I developed a lot of pain in my lumber region. That's why I have had the RFA and epidurals, not for the pain in my right toes. The SCS were for the toes. However, I've been told by doctor's that using a SCS, they can target pain in two area, i.e. lower back and foot.

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I have had the implant device only for spinal pain. My experience unfortunately was aweful. It caused my right leg to feel as heavy as a tree trunk & I had “zips” of excruciating pain when that happened. Down my legs, one arm & shoulder. I let them continue to adjust things on their side for 3 weeks. They had implanted mine because after the trial I told them I really couldn’t tell a difference! After the third week of sleepless nights, people staring because I couldn’t make my right leg work correctly & had to drag it around, on top of way more pain than I started with; I asked that they be removed! Apparently that’s not too uncommon according to the anesthesiologist I had. Good luck hon with whatever your decision is! Everyone’s body is different; you may have a wonderful experience… you kind of have to go with your gut on this one. My advice as an RN… “If your pain is manageable with your current treatment; leave well enough alone!” But if your pain has been relentless & nothing you’ve tried has given you relief, “then by all means try something different!” Best of luck! Peace & Joy!!🫶🏼🙏🏼🙌🏼

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Hi
I had what I understand to be quite a typical experience with a spinal cord stimulators. I had 2 trials of the old Boston Scientific ones… Got the two types of main side effects. One I had motor stimulation to my muscles and the second I had severe positionality, which meant I could move, and then suddenly get a zap from the simulator

Third time lucky went to Australia when Abbott’s DRG was just starting up. It was quite obvious that I got a 50% or more relief from the device in my trial, so I got the permanent device in. It really did help my pain and changed my life , but unfortunately, after seven months, it just wore off. Subsequent attempts at adjusting it or trying a new trial over top of it were unsuccessful so I had it pulled, and I am not doing well with other things I’ve tried since.
it was interesting that I really was able to start a new life with a bit less pain for those seven months, but very cruel to have it taken away , I think if you look at the studies my experience is quite common in the sense that these devices work and quite a few stop working within five years. I think the numbers are in the range of 50% or higher… So that’s something to ask your doctor about it .

Good luck… my opinion is that it is worth trying, but don’t get talked into having a permanent implant if you’re not sure that you’re getting relief. your brain is really wanting to tell you that the pain is less because you’re so keen… But you really have to concentrate and figure out whether it is really giving you relief. I think the way to figure that out during the trial is not what you’re feeling but more of what you’re doing in terms of it should be giving you more functionality , that sort of like the difference between subjective and objective evidence .
The companies and doctors definitely want you to have a permanent implant from a business perspective unfortunately.
Good luck !

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