Heart Problems, Cardiac Symptoms, But Test Results Normal

Posted by deepakkumar @deepakkumar, Thu, Apr 11 11:29pm

m heart rate had go to very fast last night at 3.00 am about 120 to 130 per minutes, when i change position and go to outdoor slowly and return to bedroom, it become normal and I sleep again. Again when i weak up in morning, again heart rate is about 110 to 120. This type of happen three times in 5 months . I tested for ECG, EcoCG,EEG, Ions, CBC,BP and DC. all are normal. Also sometime when i am in standing or sitting, a sudden cardiac arrest type of event occur and I have faint, sweeting.

My cardiologist had me on the highest dose of beta blocker possible; that is 320 mg of sotacor per day. He warned me that at that dose my heart could STOP!..so he told me to try to reduce the dose. I was alarmed but reducing the dose even by 1/2 of one 80 mg tablet made my heart become totally arrhythmic. So, a high dose of a beta blocker can be dangerous. I was exhausted and felt like an old lady on such a high dose of beta blocker. So I am so glad I decided to push my heart with aerobic exercise and within 4 weeks I got the dose down (always gradually) to zero. And it worked at curing my A-fib.

REPLY
@heffert

I’m such a high anxiety person. These drugs scare me. The side effects look horrible. I did read that it could get worse over time. Why is it even happening at all?? I’d like to have an answer to that question. I guess it can’t be answered. When I wore the monitor it happened 3 times and I never felt a thing. I’m only 45 years old. Won’t it be dangerous to be on those meds for years?

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Hi @heffert,

I think most of us would do without meds if given the option – but sometimes they are necessary. I can most certainly see how the emphasis on diet and exercise, and the societal push to "do things naturally,” can convince us about alternatives or not following the doctor’s recommendations – this is especially true for drugs that treat ‘silent’ or asymptomatic conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease.

Here are a few facts about heart disease:
– Heart disease kills 1 in every 4 people in the United States.
– Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States.
– It is also one of the most preventable.
– Some of the most commonly prescribed medications for heart problems are beta blockers.
https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_heart_disease.htm
…and what you should know about beta blockers:
When the heart's arteries become narrowed or weak, the heart compensates by pumping harder and faster. This increases the demand for oxygen and can cause angina, which is chest pain, as well as as high blood pressure or arrhythmia, which is an irregular heartbeat.
Beta blockers slow down the heart to give it a break from working so hard. The heart's squeezing function relaxes a bit, which causes blood pressure to go down, easing pain and helping regulate the heartbeat. Beta blockers also help open up your veins and arteries to improve blood flow. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/beta-blockers/art-20044522

…and detailed information about ventricular tachycardia:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ventricular-tachycardia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355138
I also thought you might wish to view this very interesting article, "Is Any Patient with Chronic Heart Failure Receiving the Right Dose of the Right Beta-Blocker in Primary Care?" https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(19)30311-0/fulltext

@heffert, just as “silent” conditions have no overt symptoms, initially, the consequences of not taking medication may not show up immediately. But by putting your health at risk there can be serious long-term consequences.
Taking medication, as directed by your doctor, is a decision only you can make. Can you talk to your doctor and explain your concerns?

REPLY
@kanaazpereira

Hi @heffert,

I think most of us would do without meds if given the option – but sometimes they are necessary. I can most certainly see how the emphasis on diet and exercise, and the societal push to "do things naturally,” can convince us about alternatives or not following the doctor’s recommendations – this is especially true for drugs that treat ‘silent’ or asymptomatic conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease.

Here are a few facts about heart disease:
– Heart disease kills 1 in every 4 people in the United States.
– Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States.
– It is also one of the most preventable.
– Some of the most commonly prescribed medications for heart problems are beta blockers.
https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_heart_disease.htm
…and what you should know about beta blockers:
When the heart's arteries become narrowed or weak, the heart compensates by pumping harder and faster. This increases the demand for oxygen and can cause angina, which is chest pain, as well as as high blood pressure or arrhythmia, which is an irregular heartbeat.
Beta blockers slow down the heart to give it a break from working so hard. The heart's squeezing function relaxes a bit, which causes blood pressure to go down, easing pain and helping regulate the heartbeat. Beta blockers also help open up your veins and arteries to improve blood flow. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/beta-blockers/art-20044522

…and detailed information about ventricular tachycardia:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ventricular-tachycardia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355138
I also thought you might wish to view this very interesting article, "Is Any Patient with Chronic Heart Failure Receiving the Right Dose of the Right Beta-Blocker in Primary Care?" https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(19)30311-0/fulltext

@heffert, just as “silent” conditions have no overt symptoms, initially, the consequences of not taking medication may not show up immediately. But by putting your health at risk there can be serious long-term consequences.
Taking medication, as directed by your doctor, is a decision only you can make. Can you talk to your doctor and explain your concerns?

Jump to this post

I do need more answers from my doctor. I was told my heart is very healthy. No signs of disease etc. So why or how does this happen? And if I leave it will it only cause problems in the future?

REPLY
@kanaazpereira

Hi @heffert,

I think most of us would do without meds if given the option – but sometimes they are necessary. I can most certainly see how the emphasis on diet and exercise, and the societal push to "do things naturally,” can convince us about alternatives or not following the doctor’s recommendations – this is especially true for drugs that treat ‘silent’ or asymptomatic conditions like high blood pressure, heart disease.

Here are a few facts about heart disease:
– Heart disease kills 1 in every 4 people in the United States.
– Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States.
– It is also one of the most preventable.
– Some of the most commonly prescribed medications for heart problems are beta blockers.
https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_heart_disease.htm
…and what you should know about beta blockers:
When the heart's arteries become narrowed or weak, the heart compensates by pumping harder and faster. This increases the demand for oxygen and can cause angina, which is chest pain, as well as as high blood pressure or arrhythmia, which is an irregular heartbeat.
Beta blockers slow down the heart to give it a break from working so hard. The heart's squeezing function relaxes a bit, which causes blood pressure to go down, easing pain and helping regulate the heartbeat. Beta blockers also help open up your veins and arteries to improve blood flow. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/beta-blockers/art-20044522

…and detailed information about ventricular tachycardia:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ventricular-tachycardia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355138
I also thought you might wish to view this very interesting article, "Is Any Patient with Chronic Heart Failure Receiving the Right Dose of the Right Beta-Blocker in Primary Care?" https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(19)30311-0/fulltext

@heffert, just as “silent” conditions have no overt symptoms, initially, the consequences of not taking medication may not show up immediately. But by putting your health at risk there can be serious long-term consequences.
Taking medication, as directed by your doctor, is a decision only you can make. Can you talk to your doctor and explain your concerns?

Jump to this post

My son was a volunteer, trained paramedic on the local department before they became a full-time paid department and was available at night for many emergency runs to help people in distress, as well as auto accidents in addition to his regular job in the family business.
He liked serving the community and learned much about responding quickly to frightening health problems before they became serious and debilitating. We both learned much about preventive help to keep our hearts working well, including exercise and medications.
It is a balancing act we take and it is o.k. to be cautious about both our reactions to medications and our personal activity choices.
I am just not ready to sit in a rocker half drugged so I can say I lived longer. Life is a little risky when you are 84 and ambitious.
Plus I am learning to be careful because falling is a big problem at my age that can wreck my body in short order. I also try to learn from the experiences of others which is why I contribute to Mayo Clinic Connect. We should celebrate our successes more often. Dorisena

REPLY
@heffert

I do need more answers from my doctor. I was told my heart is very healthy. No signs of disease etc. So why or how does this happen? And if I leave it will it only cause problems in the future?

Jump to this post

If your heart is healthy, after testing, and an echocardiogram, then you could have a deficiency in magnesium and vitamin D which is very common.

If you were having an issue with palpitations or a fib, you may have a hernia pressing on the Vagus nerve.

There are many reasons why people can have heart symptoms, and they’re not be anything wrong with the heart.

I pray you find the answers you seek, and maybe you need to see an integrative functional MD/cardiologist.

Liked by heffert

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