Have you tried to quit smoking while undergoing treatment?

The decision to quit smoking is a very personal one. Everyone has his or her own reason that helps start the journey to quit smoking. The diagnosis of a serious illness or chronic condition, like cancer, a heart condition, lung condition, diabetes, might be one reason to quit smoking as part of treatment and recovery.

Are you currently undergoing treatment for a serious illness or chronic condition, or are you a survivor of a serious illness who made the decision to quit smoking while undergoing treatment? If yes, and you feel comfortable doing so, please share the experience of your journey to quit smoking.

Thank you for sharing your experiences anonymously in the online survey. The survey is now closed.

However you can continue to share your experiences here in an open discussion with other members. Your story can help others on their journey to quit smoking.

  • Did you decide to quit while undergoing treatment? Why or why not?
  • What uncertainties or challenges did you face?
  • How did your care providers support you to quit smoking? How could they have supported you differently or better?

from Nancy (shortshot) 1975 I was to have surgery next morning, the doc came inn and told me I would have a better chance of coming our of anesthesia if I put the cigarette out. I put it out and NEVER picked up another one. I did have any trouble quitting at all. I Just did it! I had smoked for probably 15 years. Never again. Nancy

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@shortshot80

from Nancy (shortshot) 1975 I was to have surgery next morning, the doc came inn and told me I would have a better chance of coming our of anesthesia if I put the cigarette out. I put it out and NEVER picked up another one. I did have any trouble quitting at all. I Just did it! I had smoked for probably 15 years. Never again. Nancy

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@shortshot80 That is a great report, Nancy!

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@shortshot80

from Nancy (shortshot) 1975 I was to have surgery next morning, the doc came inn and told me I would have a better chance of coming our of anesthesia if I put the cigarette out. I put it out and NEVER picked up another one. I did have any trouble quitting at all. I Just did it! I had smoked for probably 15 years. Never again. Nancy

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@shortshot80– Oh how lucky you were! I never smoked again after I quit, after 35 years. It can be done!

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@antelope

quit 1 month ago,difficult but doable,basically it was a reaction to worrying about making a fuss bout pc while smoking,jus plain dumb

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@antelope @cinder and @metalneck. Checking in. How are you doing?

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@cinder

I quit in October of 2019. Very hard. I still miss it. But not enough to smoke. I have gained weight. Finally have started feeling better. Think of all the money you save and treat yourself. Good for you. I know how you are feeling.

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@metalneck-Good morning. You will be starting the beginning of your third month of not smoking. How are you feeling? What are you finding helps you during the roughest parts of withdrawal?

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@antelope– Good morning. I'm wondering how you are feeling after 1 month off of cigarettes. What changes have you seen in your body?

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@merpreb

@metalneck-Good morning. You will be starting the beginning of your third month of not smoking. How are you feeling? What are you finding helps you during the roughest parts of withdrawal?

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It is doable!! It's still a struggle to find a way to keep my hands busy, using crossword puzzles, games, weights, reading, whatever!!

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@meka

It is doable!! It's still a struggle to find a way to keep my hands busy, using crossword puzzles, games, weights, reading, whatever!!

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Hello @meka– How long ago did you quit? Why did you quit? It is doable. I was a very heavy smoker and I quit, almost cold turkey. One thing, before I quit, was to wonder what I would do instead. I found out that I do everything else other than smoke!

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@merpreb

Hello @meka– How long ago did you quit? Why did you quit? It is doable. I was a very heavy smoker and I quit, almost cold turkey. One thing, before I quit, was to wonder what I would do instead. I found out that I do everything else other than smoke!

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Couple years now, right before being diagnosed. Worked on it for years before, but always started again, even after stopping for almost two years!!

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@meka– That's wonderful! How are you feeling better?

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My whole family wants me to NOT quit. A doctor told my friend with cancer, the jolt it would create would hamper my recovery. This sounds crazy, but I found several articles stating the same thing. The best I heard is slowly cutting down until you are at zero. This would not shock the body. Sounds nuts to me but also makes sense. Ideas?

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@kowalski

My whole family wants me to NOT quit. A doctor told my friend with cancer, the jolt it would create would hamper my recovery. This sounds crazy, but I found several articles stating the same thing. The best I heard is slowly cutting down until you are at zero. This would not shock the body. Sounds nuts to me but also makes sense. Ideas?

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Never heard of that one before. I am so glad I did quit for so many reasons, wish you all the luck in the world, it can be done!!!

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@kowalski

My whole family wants me to NOT quit. A doctor told my friend with cancer, the jolt it would create would hamper my recovery. This sounds crazy, but I found several articles stating the same thing. The best I heard is slowly cutting down until you are at zero. This would not shock the body. Sounds nuts to me but also makes sense. Ideas?

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@kowalski That doesn't sound like anything I'd come across. I just googled and found the attached reasons why smoking hampers recovery. It's from Cleveland Clinic but I'm pretty sure I'd seen the same either on Mayo's site or cancer.org when I was going through it. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/smoking-cancer-diagnosis-quit-now/

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@bluelagoon

@kowalski That doesn't sound like anything I'd come across. I just googled and found the attached reasons why smoking hampers recovery. It's from Cleveland Clinic but I'm pretty sure I'd seen the same either on Mayo's site or cancer.org when I was going through it. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/smoking-cancer-diagnosis-quit-now/

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Will gather more info. Keeping smoking sounds false.

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@kowalski

My whole family wants me to NOT quit. A doctor told my friend with cancer, the jolt it would create would hamper my recovery. This sounds crazy, but I found several articles stating the same thing. The best I heard is slowly cutting down until you are at zero. This would not shock the body. Sounds nuts to me but also makes sense. Ideas?

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Quitting is hard. But your body will thank you, regardless of any “jolt” to your system. We don’t like to hear that we are addicted, but anyone who’s tried to quit has learned how addictive tobacco is.
Not quitting for fear of a jolt is an easy rationalization to keep smoking. Don’t believe it.
You’ve got this. Go for the jolt!

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