Have you tried to quit smoking while undergoing treatment?

The decision to quit smoking is a very personal one. Everyone has his or her own reason that helps start the journey to quit smoking. The diagnosis of a serious illness or chronic condition, like cancer, a heart condition, lung condition, diabetes, might be one reason to quit smoking as part of treatment and recovery.

Are you currently undergoing treatment for a serious illness or chronic condition, or are you a survivor of a serious illness who made the decision to quit smoking while undergoing treatment? If yes, and you feel comfortable doing so, please share the experience of your journey to quit smoking.

Thank you for sharing your experiences anonymously in the online survey. The survey is now closed.

However you can continue to share your experiences here in an open discussion with other members. Your story can help others on their journey to quit smoking.

  • Did you decide to quit while undergoing treatment? Why or why not?
  • What uncertainties or challenges did you face?
  • How did your care providers support you to quit smoking? How could they have supported you differently or better?
@alamogal635

Quit after many struggles in 1995. What helped was Nicorette 2mgs. and then Original Trident gum. Have no idea why Trident was and is so satisfying, but it still is. I like being smoke free and not heavily addicted as I had been. Was in a place where there was heavy smoking earlier this year and I felt like I was going to be unable to breathe. Still, every once and a while the urge comes back and I just say I won't smoke because I want to be healthy and live my life as fully as possible.

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@alamogal635 @kowalski I read a while back that it's more difficult for women to quit because they actually enjoy it more than men do! I tend to want one when I am around other smokers, which is less and less as time goes on. I really am glad that I did quit, it was worth it. One less thing to worry about and the cost of cigarettes is so high now, it's crazy.
JK

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@merpreb

@kowalski– lol, my error. I meant to ask why are you not setting a closer date to quit?

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Stopping smoking is a shock to the body. Better to taper to less smokes, which should make quitting easier ?

Liked by metalneck

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@kowalski

Stopping smoking is a shock to the body. Better to taper to less smokes, which should make quitting easier ?

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@kowalski some of us are all or nothing people. For me it’s easier to just stop. I’m the same way with food, better to have none of things that are not healthy for me than to try to have a little.
JK

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@contentandwell

@kowalski some of us are all or nothing people. For me it’s easier to just stop. I’m the same way with food, better to have none of things that are not healthy for me than to try to have a little.
JK

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@contentandwell @kowalski JK- I am SO like you! LOL!!

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@bluelagoon– I think that's why I quit all at once too, I'm an all or nothing gal.

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@shortshot80

July 4, 19 (shortshot nancy) Update…. I saw my oncologist lastt week, am doing just great as far as the cancer. Very slowly with PT for my hip. I requested of my primary to send me to more PT and so I have started on that. My urinary infections is a ongoing process. I have had at least five months of recurring infections, last one was a drug resistant . Each of the medications that I have had in the recent past has not killed the infection, so primary doc sending me to a "infection decease at OHSU in Portland. I go there on the 10 th. Hopefully they can find what's wrong. Also going to a urologist on the 30th. Cancer doc wants another CT on the last week of July, see her on August 8. So am getting things ready for that too. Other than all the above I'm doing pretty well. Am still working on my book am about half way. Just thought I would check in today. Happy Fourth of July everyone. Nancy

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@shortshot80 Hi Nancy,

It has been a while since I heard from you. I hope that your UTI is cleared up now and that your PT has helped your hip. When you have a moment please send me a post and let me know how you are doing!

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Hi, @merpreb and @contentandwell -You've both talked about quitting smoking before. Just wanted to check in with you and see how it's been going for you lately. Are you finding it to be challenging at this point to stay away from cigarettes? Easy?

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@lisalucier

Hi, @merpreb and @contentandwell -You've both talked about quitting smoking before. Just wanted to check in with you and see how it's been going for you lately. Are you finding it to be challenging at this point to stay away from cigarettes? Easy?

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@lisalucier I quit smoking on New Year's Eve, 1979, when I was pregnant with my son. I always said I would quit if I got pregnant and I did. When my son was younger he always took credit for me quitting. I still had a slight craving for them for a long time but not anymore. I read somewhere that it is more difficult for women to quit smoking because women actually like it more!
I know that both of my kids smoked occasionally when they were in HS but that was a social thing and neither did it enough to get addicted. Sometimes when they brought friends home I would cringe because some of their friends reeked of cigarette smoke.
With the price of cigarettes these days I am glad I no longer do smoke.
JK

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I last smoked January 2, 2020, the morning of my lobectomy. I am taking Chantix twice a day. The urge to smoke has been intense at times – at other times it's easy to shrug off. When it gets intense I get a spearmint flavored mint and it helps. I also do mind tricks on myself (similar to biofeedback) where I imagine things, daydream or talk myself out of the cigarette. I applaud everyone that has quit cold turkey!! For those of us who don't do so well with that, I would enjoy reading on how you've done it/are doing it!

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@metalneck

I last smoked January 2, 2020, the morning of my lobectomy. I am taking Chantix twice a day. The urge to smoke has been intense at times – at other times it's easy to shrug off. When it gets intense I get a spearmint flavored mint and it helps. I also do mind tricks on myself (similar to biofeedback) where I imagine things, daydream or talk myself out of the cigarette. I applaud everyone that has quit cold turkey!! For those of us who don't do so well with that, I would enjoy reading on how you've done it/are doing it!

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I quit in October of 2019. Very hard. I still miss it. But not enough to smoke. I have gained weight. Finally have started feeling better. Think of all the money you save and treat yourself. Good for you. I know how you are feeling.

Liked by Lisa Lucier

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@metalneck

I last smoked January 2, 2020, the morning of my lobectomy. I am taking Chantix twice a day. The urge to smoke has been intense at times – at other times it's easy to shrug off. When it gets intense I get a spearmint flavored mint and it helps. I also do mind tricks on myself (similar to biofeedback) where I imagine things, daydream or talk myself out of the cigarette. I applaud everyone that has quit cold turkey!! For those of us who don't do so well with that, I would enjoy reading on how you've done it/are doing it!

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@metalneck @cinder I so relate to both of you. The good news is I'm 2 weeks to the day away from getting to my 4 year Quit Smoking anniversary. And, although I still enjoy walking past someone smoking a cigarette I now think smoky rooms stink and have no interest in smoking. The realistic news is a friend told me it took him 6 months to get over the hump. I hoped that wouldn't be my case, but it was. I underestimated how helpful Chantix was since the urge was, as you say, intense at times. But, don't let anyone tell you that you can just stop the Chantix without weaning off it, like you built it up. After 4 months when I just stopped I gained the most of my weight and had major urges to the point of being miserable. The doc renewed my script and after a couple more weeks when I drew down slowly I did fine from there. Interesting to me was that I never thought of after a meal as my biggest need but to this day, if I don't have a wintergreen lifesaver on hand things could get dicey!

As far as mind games- try to get your hands on Allen Carr's book "Easy Way To Stop Smoking." My dentist told me how one of her patients had success when she read and I then did, too. He makes a great case for how we were hypnotized into smoking (as opposed to going to a hypnotist to stop smoking.) He built a case for my mind to wrap around, and along with Chantix and the will to persevere, that was the ticket. And, once you get to the other side where you don't stress about needing to get where you can smoke after being stuck somewhere too long is so freeing. Hang in there!

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@metalneck

I last smoked January 2, 2020, the morning of my lobectomy. I am taking Chantix twice a day. The urge to smoke has been intense at times – at other times it's easy to shrug off. When it gets intense I get a spearmint flavored mint and it helps. I also do mind tricks on myself (similar to biofeedback) where I imagine things, daydream or talk myself out of the cigarette. I applaud everyone that has quit cold turkey!! For those of us who don't do so well with that, I would enjoy reading on how you've done it/are doing it!

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@metalneck I am an all or nothing person. For me, cold-turkey was the only way to go.
JK

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