Have you tried to quit smoking while undergoing treatment?

Posted by Colleen Young @colleenyoung, Jun 7, 2018

The decision to quit smoking is a very personal one. Everyone has his or her own reason that helps start the journey to quit smoking. The diagnosis of a serious illness or chronic condition, like cancer, a heart condition, lung condition, diabetes, might be one reason to quit smoking as part of treatment and recovery.

Are you currently undergoing treatment for a serious illness or chronic condition, or are you a survivor of a serious illness who made the decision to quit smoking while undergoing treatment? If yes, and you feel comfortable doing so, please share the experience of your journey to quit smoking.

Thank you for sharing your experiences anonymously in the online survey. The survey is now closed.

However you can continue to share your experiences here in an open discussion with other members. Your story can help others on their journey to quit smoking.

  • Did you decide to quit while undergoing treatment? Why or why not?
  • What uncertainties or challenges did you face?
  • How did your care providers support you to quit smoking? How could they have supported you differently or better?

I have a friend who had spinal stenosis, twice. Each time he had an operation and was out of the hospital the next day with no pain. We hike very rough terrain so it was a really great result. I understand the surgeon uses a tool to free the nerves in the spinal column. I don't know if you have the same problem but in his case, it was really excellent results.

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I was diagnosed with Osteoporosis. However, I had NO spine or bone pain issues, until a Prolia injection… which took me down for 7 days. I thought I
had the worst flu of my entire life and a respiratory infection that almost killed me. I questioned the Prolia and was told, the second time shouldn't be
as bad! I was very concerned, but was told not to worry. The second shot was as bad as the first. When I returned for follow up bone scan, I was then
told about a report that recently came out of Europe about Prolia! Shocking! Scary! Concerning! No antidote!
Oh by the way, I am an avid runner! Mountain bicyclist, healthy eater, no alcohol and no smoking. Fighting the bone pain, headaches, and all the evil
things that Prolia can do to a body. I never dreamed I would be in the same class as a test rodent!
My questions has been…so what did our grandmothers do about osteoporosis?

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I gave up smoking on New Year's Eve, 1979. I was smoking at least two packs a day, but that's misleading because many of them just burned out in the ashtray if I got busy on something in work.
I have to admit, I had a great motivation so that made it much easier. I was pregnant. When my son was younger he loved taking credit for being the person who made me give up cigarettes.
Unfortunately, I do still sometimes crave one, particularly if I am around a person who is smoking. I read a long time ago that it is more difficult for women to give up smoking than it is for men because women are not just physically addicted, they really enjoy it more than men do! I believe it.
JK

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@llwortman

I was diagnosed with Osteoporosis. However, I had NO spine or bone pain issues, until a Prolia injection… which took me down for 7 days. I thought I
had the worst flu of my entire life and a respiratory infection that almost killed me. I questioned the Prolia and was told, the second time shouldn't be
as bad! I was very concerned, but was told not to worry. The second shot was as bad as the first. When I returned for follow up bone scan, I was then
told about a report that recently came out of Europe about Prolia! Shocking! Scary! Concerning! No antidote!
Oh by the way, I am an avid runner! Mountain bicyclist, healthy eater, no alcohol and no smoking. Fighting the bone pain, headaches, and all the evil
things that Prolia can do to a body. I never dreamed I would be in the same class as a test rodent!
My questions has been…so what did our grandmothers do about osteoporosis?

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@llwortman I don't think our mothers/grandmothers did anything about osteoporosis, what could they do? My mother had it and leaning over the meat counter to get a piece at the back she broke a number of ribs! She just lived it with, no other options.
JK

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@llwortman

I was diagnosed with Osteoporosis. However, I had NO spine or bone pain issues, until a Prolia injection… which took me down for 7 days. I thought I
had the worst flu of my entire life and a respiratory infection that almost killed me. I questioned the Prolia and was told, the second time shouldn't be
as bad! I was very concerned, but was told not to worry. The second shot was as bad as the first. When I returned for follow up bone scan, I was then
told about a report that recently came out of Europe about Prolia! Shocking! Scary! Concerning! No antidote!
Oh by the way, I am an avid runner! Mountain bicyclist, healthy eater, no alcohol and no smoking. Fighting the bone pain, headaches, and all the evil
things that Prolia can do to a body. I never dreamed I would be in the same class as a test rodent!
My questions has been…so what did our grandmothers do about osteoporosis?

Jump to this post

@llwortman I have often wondered the same thing about past relatives. Sorry you have experienced this with the Prolia. Does leave one feeling much like an experimental critter.

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@contentandwell

@llwortman I don't think our mothers/grandmothers did anything about osteoporosis, what could they do? My mother had it and leaning over the meat counter to get a piece at the back she broke a number of ribs! She just lived it with, no other options.
JK

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@contentandwell The relatives I had with these types of issues seemed to just deal. They never complained and knew it was old age and nothing could be done other than keep going. I need to quit my whining and just keep going as best I can.

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@llwortman

I was diagnosed with Osteoporosis. However, I had NO spine or bone pain issues, until a Prolia injection… which took me down for 7 days. I thought I
had the worst flu of my entire life and a respiratory infection that almost killed me. I questioned the Prolia and was told, the second time shouldn't be
as bad! I was very concerned, but was told not to worry. The second shot was as bad as the first. When I returned for follow up bone scan, I was then
told about a report that recently came out of Europe about Prolia! Shocking! Scary! Concerning! No antidote!
Oh by the way, I am an avid runner! Mountain bicyclist, healthy eater, no alcohol and no smoking. Fighting the bone pain, headaches, and all the evil
things that Prolia can do to a body. I never dreamed I would be in the same class as a test rodent!
My questions has been…so what did our grandmothers do about osteoporosis?

Jump to this post

@llwortman – I think our sisters of yore had very tough times after menopause. A lot of them died and probably suffered a lot of broken bones. Right now I'm facing a quandary because I might be having a reaction to Fosamax and the shot and it's affects scare the h… out of me.
I also have no pain and have no idea what to do. Needless to say I am very worried about this. And I quit smoking 21 years ago!

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@parus

@contentandwell The relatives I had with these types of issues seemed to just deal. They never complained and knew it was old age and nothing could be done other than keep going. I need to quit my whining and just keep going as best I can.

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Parus- That's an excellent point- they had no choice to just tolerate things. When my mom had Parkinson's disease, even if we were standing right next to her she would just fall or collapse. There has to be someone, somewhere who has a better answer for osteoporosis!

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@parus

@contentandwell The relatives I had with these types of issues seemed to just deal. They never complained and knew it was old age and nothing could be done other than keep going. I need to quit my whining and just keep going as best I can.

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@parus You're right, they did just deal with it. My mother passed away when she was 67 though, had she lived longer her osteoporosis probably gotten much worse.
I think at our ages a certain amount of "whining" is OK, as long as we don't let it become too much and too frequent. Some of the conditions that we have are simply a pain in the butt.
JK

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I don’t have osteoporosis at this point. I have 2 younger sisters with osteoporosis. They both had Forteo injections which was unpleasant. I have a bone density again this year. One of them has recently learned she has hereditary hemochromatosis too.
We just never know what genetics will do. Family history can be helpful and can also scare the beejeebers out of one. Has positive and negative aspects.
I do the best I can and have learned that I can only control my own behavior. Not all that easy at times.
Off the topic of smoking in a way. Those trying to quit need lots of support. I just decided to quit. There still are times when I get down I think about it. Get into that mode of what difference does it make?? Yup, get into that “nobody loves me” thought pattern. Remind myself my little 3 year grandson does. Yup, I am smiling now.
Holidays alone can be rough but I do not miss all of that baking, basting, searing, etc. If someone could capture all those yummy smells…

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To those of you discussing osteoporosis, Prolia and Forteo, I encourage you to join the active discussions in the Bones, Joints & Muscles group. For example:
– Prolia treatment for osteoporosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/prolix-treatment-for-osteoporosis/
– Side Effects of Prolia https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/side-effects-of-prolia/
– Forteo vs. Tymlos https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/forteo-vs-tymlos-1/
– Treating Osteoporosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/hi-im-new-to-the-site-and-am-interested-in-treating-osteoperosis/

To return to the topic of smoking and quitting. @noreenbeth1963 @merpreb @harleymama @parus @contentandwell you all make great points about the challenges and emotions of quitting smoking and the importance of keep on trying and getting help from all sources, including a social network like Connect.

Have you noticed that the Smoking & Quitting group (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/smoking-quitting/) leads to another site called BecomeAnEx? We did this because BecomeAnEX is a thriving community specifically to support people wanting to quit smoking. BecomeAnEX is a collaboration between the Truth Initiative and the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC). If you know anyone who is looking for help and support to quit, you might wish to suggest they visit https://www.becomeanex.org/

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@colleen – Wow- great suggestions. Thank you

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