Have you tried to quit smoking while undergoing treatment?

The decision to quit smoking is a very personal one. Everyone has his or her own reason that helps start the journey to quit smoking. The diagnosis of a serious illness or chronic condition, like cancer, a heart condition, lung condition, diabetes, might be one reason to quit smoking as part of treatment and recovery.

Are you currently undergoing treatment for a serious illness or chronic condition, or are you a survivor of a serious illness who made the decision to quit smoking while undergoing treatment? If yes, and you feel comfortable doing so, please share the experience of your journey to quit smoking.

Thank you for sharing your experiences anonymously in the online survey. The survey is now closed.

However you can continue to share your experiences here in an open discussion with other members. Your story can help others on their journey to quit smoking.

  • Did you decide to quit while undergoing treatment? Why or why not?
  • What uncertainties or challenges did you face?
  • How did your care providers support you to quit smoking? How could they have supported you differently or better?

I don’t have osteoporosis at this point. I have 2 younger sisters with osteoporosis. They both had Forteo injections which was unpleasant. I have a bone density again this year. One of them has recently learned she has hereditary hemochromatosis too.
We just never know what genetics will do. Family history can be helpful and can also scare the beejeebers out of one. Has positive and negative aspects.
I do the best I can and have learned that I can only control my own behavior. Not all that easy at times.
Off the topic of smoking in a way. Those trying to quit need lots of support. I just decided to quit. There still are times when I get down I think about it. Get into that mode of what difference does it make?? Yup, get into that “nobody loves me” thought pattern. Remind myself my little 3 year grandson does. Yup, I am smiling now.
Holidays alone can be rough but I do not miss all of that baking, basting, searing, etc. If someone could capture all those yummy smells…

REPLY

To those of you discussing osteoporosis, Prolia and Forteo, I encourage you to join the active discussions in the Bones, Joints & Muscles group. For example:
– Prolia treatment for osteoporosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/prolix-treatment-for-osteoporosis/
– Side Effects of Prolia https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/side-effects-of-prolia/
– Forteo vs. Tymlos https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/forteo-vs-tymlos-1/
– Treating Osteoporosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/hi-im-new-to-the-site-and-am-interested-in-treating-osteoperosis/

To return to the topic of smoking and quitting. @noreenbeth1963 @merpreb @harleymama @parus @contentandwell you all make great points about the challenges and emotions of quitting smoking and the importance of keep on trying and getting help from all sources, including a social network like Connect.

Have you noticed that the Smoking & Quitting group (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/smoking-quitting/) leads to another site called BecomeAnEx? We did this because BecomeAnEX is a thriving community specifically to support people wanting to quit smoking. BecomeAnEX is a collaboration between the Truth Initiative and the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC). If you know anyone who is looking for help and support to quit, you might wish to suggest they visit https://www.becomeanex.org/

REPLY

@colleen – Wow- great suggestions. Thank you

REPLY
@merpreb

@llwortman – I think our sisters of yore had very tough times after menopause. A lot of them died and probably suffered a lot of broken bones. Right now I'm facing a quandary because I might be having a reaction to Fosamax and the shot and it's affects scare the h… out of me.
I also have no pain and have no idea what to do. Needless to say I am very worried about this. And I quit smoking 21 years ago!

Jump to this post

I am still smoking and have horrible mouth and throat issues. I am not stupid enough to say smoking doesn't aggravate these problems but feel something else is going on. I am so uncomfortable, it affects my life daily. As soon as a doctor sees you smoke, they attribute anything wrong with you to smoking. Due to stomach issues, and being on the medications I am in, cannot take Chantix. I also have Osteo, as did my mother. She was old school and would not take any of the drugs. My Endocronologist is after me to taje the Prolia shots but I am afraid to. My bone density tests are worsening at age 69. Due to GI issues, I cannot take oral meds. Concerns ne whenever the doctors say it is perfectly safe yet, you get on the Internet and read otherwise. Of course, you are told to stay away from Dr. Google. I don't know what to do about smoking or the Osteo. My mother lived to 95 but I saw her in pain daily.

REPLY
@margot69

I am still smoking and have horrible mouth and throat issues. I am not stupid enough to say smoking doesn't aggravate these problems but feel something else is going on. I am so uncomfortable, it affects my life daily. As soon as a doctor sees you smoke, they attribute anything wrong with you to smoking. Due to stomach issues, and being on the medications I am in, cannot take Chantix. I also have Osteo, as did my mother. She was old school and would not take any of the drugs. My Endocronologist is after me to taje the Prolia shots but I am afraid to. My bone density tests are worsening at age 69. Due to GI issues, I cannot take oral meds. Concerns ne whenever the doctors say it is perfectly safe yet, you get on the Internet and read otherwise. Of course, you are told to stay away from Dr. Google. I don't know what to do about smoking or the Osteo. My mother lived to 95 but I saw her in pain daily.

Jump to this post

Sorry to hear about that combo of issues which complicate things for you. If you are a reader I'd suggest you check out The Easy Way to Stop Smoking Book by Allen Carr. It sounds gimmicky but another patient of my dentist quit after reading it and told her, who told me. What I liked was, unlike people who get hypnotized, it helps you understand how you have been hypnotized into smoking. I was able to use Chantix when I quit, but I really give most of the credit to the book's ability to make me see things from the other side and persevere during the times when I didn't really think the Chantix was helping.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

To those of you discussing osteoporosis, Prolia and Forteo, I encourage you to join the active discussions in the Bones, Joints & Muscles group. For example:
– Prolia treatment for osteoporosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/prolix-treatment-for-osteoporosis/
– Side Effects of Prolia https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/side-effects-of-prolia/
– Forteo vs. Tymlos https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/forteo-vs-tymlos-1/
– Treating Osteoporosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/hi-im-new-to-the-site-and-am-interested-in-treating-osteoperosis/

To return to the topic of smoking and quitting. @noreenbeth1963 @merpreb @harleymama @parus @contentandwell you all make great points about the challenges and emotions of quitting smoking and the importance of keep on trying and getting help from all sources, including a social network like Connect.

Have you noticed that the Smoking & Quitting group (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/smoking-quitting/) leads to another site called BecomeAnEx? We did this because BecomeAnEX is a thriving community specifically to support people wanting to quit smoking. BecomeAnEX is a collaboration between the Truth Initiative and the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center (NDC). If you know anyone who is looking for help and support to quit, you might wish to suggest they visit https://www.becomeanex.org/

Jump to this post

@colleenyoung Yep, I'm a "quitter" and so glad that I did manage to quit. I know I mentioned previously that being pregnant I had more incentive than I had before, but I also should have mentioned that it was a bit easier then because I had very frequent underlying nausea. That helped me to quit too. It isn't easy for most of us and for those who manage to do it without the incentives I had, I have great admiration. These days another incentive is the cost of cigarettes! I simply cannot imagine spending that much on them.
JK

REPLY
@margot69

I am still smoking and have horrible mouth and throat issues. I am not stupid enough to say smoking doesn't aggravate these problems but feel something else is going on. I am so uncomfortable, it affects my life daily. As soon as a doctor sees you smoke, they attribute anything wrong with you to smoking. Due to stomach issues, and being on the medications I am in, cannot take Chantix. I also have Osteo, as did my mother. She was old school and would not take any of the drugs. My Endocronologist is after me to taje the Prolia shots but I am afraid to. My bone density tests are worsening at age 69. Due to GI issues, I cannot take oral meds. Concerns ne whenever the doctors say it is perfectly safe yet, you get on the Internet and read otherwise. Of course, you are told to stay away from Dr. Google. I don't know what to do about smoking or the Osteo. My mother lived to 95 but I saw her in pain daily.

Jump to this post

@margot69 Was your mother a smoker as well?

REPLY

@margot69. I'm a quitter too of twenty-one years! I do not think that anyone will tell you that quitting smoking is easy, it isn't. But the side effects that you seem to have from smoking now will be more difficult as time goes on than the urges that come when you do quit. There are fears of what will we do when we do quit? Will we be obsessed with thinking about it? Most likely for a while, but your mind will have better things to do as you become more active. And that's the best thing- you do get healthier! I developed a mantra that I will let you borrow :). "If you smoke, you will die." Every time I craved a cigarette I said that and in time I found that I wasn't saying it at all. Since you have a series of problems, many that can be traced to smoking, I suggest you handle one at a time. Begin with quitting smoking. You might be surprised at how much better you will feel! There are many on-line stop smoking groups. https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/stop-smoking/about/pac-20385048 is one.

REPLY

I'm 56 years old Started smoking age 25 and smoked knowing I needed to quit.Finally quit 15 years later. One thing that helped was wife and my jobs were transferred to Atlanta. The old group of friends InBirmingham were largely smokers. The new friends we made in Atlanta were largely non-smokers. So surrounding urself with people that don't have the habit your trying to quit, whether it be smoking, drinking, drugging, went a long way in helping me quit. Changing environments to surround myself with non-using, positive role models and severing ties (at least until u'r sure u've quit) helps. Hard to do and not everyone can do that. Stayed quit for 10 years moved to a small town on coast of Alabama where it seems a lot of people smoke. A friend went outside restaurant to smoke and, famous last words, "I want one…I can just smoke one. So started back smoking for 5 years up until my hepatologist (I have cirrhosis) told me it was time to get on the liver transplant waiting list. So I guess it was sort of another "change of environment". The decision was made for me. Keep smoking (an absolute no-no when applying/on the wait list and have a chance at a new liver/lease on life. Or continue smoking, get rejected for transplant waiting list and die. So I won't call my self lucky, but this last time was much easier because it was truly life or death that I quit smoking.

REPLY

@contentanwell – I agree JK. Our mothers/grandmothers really had nothing they could do about osteoporosis. But I have a thought. Since they walked a lot more than we do, at least in my grandmother's years and early in my mom's (1916 when she was born) maybe they weren't as bothered. They actually exercised all the time with the things that they had to do. I'm not saying that this was the general rule. I do believe that bone structure is in part genetic so some of us have a more difficult time with it than others. I have an admission to make- I took Fosamax this AM to try it one more time. I am very afraid of another break so I'm going to try it this one last time. I have an endoscopy early next month to see if anything is going on. Maybe it isn't Fosamax.

Liked by Parus

REPLY
@parus

@margot69 Was your mother a smoker as well?

Jump to this post

Yes, both my parents and most all my aunts and uncles smoked. It's was common in that generation. My father quit cold turkey and an uncle quit. My mother quit after a hospital admit. She was in her 70's, which I am nearing. I just cannot wrap my head around quitting.

Liked by Parus

REPLY

@margot– I know that the idea of quitting smoking is intimidating. My mom smoked too. But she quit by cutting down- I have no idea how she did it! You know the health impact of smoking and know that it is best to quit, and I'm sure that you will when you are ready. Smoking can also cause osteoporosis. Are you feeling well?

Liked by Parus

REPLY
@margot69

Yes, both my parents and most all my aunts and uncles smoked. It's was common in that generation. My father quit cold turkey and an uncle quit. My mother quit after a hospital admit. She was in her 70's, which I am nearing. I just cannot wrap my head around quitting.

Jump to this post

Break it down to do I want to live or die? You can do it if you love life enough.I smoked 45 years and I quit using Chantix.best move I ever made

REPLY
@iaintnomensabut

I'm 56 years old Started smoking age 25 and smoked knowing I needed to quit.Finally quit 15 years later. One thing that helped was wife and my jobs were transferred to Atlanta. The old group of friends InBirmingham were largely smokers. The new friends we made in Atlanta were largely non-smokers. So surrounding urself with people that don't have the habit your trying to quit, whether it be smoking, drinking, drugging, went a long way in helping me quit. Changing environments to surround myself with non-using, positive role models and severing ties (at least until u'r sure u've quit) helps. Hard to do and not everyone can do that. Stayed quit for 10 years moved to a small town on coast of Alabama where it seems a lot of people smoke. A friend went outside restaurant to smoke and, famous last words, "I want one…I can just smoke one. So started back smoking for 5 years up until my hepatologist (I have cirrhosis) told me it was time to get on the liver transplant waiting list. So I guess it was sort of another "change of environment". The decision was made for me. Keep smoking (an absolute no-no when applying/on the wait list and have a chance at a new liver/lease on life. Or continue smoking, get rejected for transplant waiting list and die. So I won't call my self lucky, but this last time was much easier because it was truly life or death that I quit smoking.

Jump to this post

@iaintnomensabut Being able to get a transplant certainly is a good incentive. It was my incentive to lose weight too. I knew if I could lose weight that my recovery would be easier, plus at that time I read that some transplant centers require a BMI under 30, which mine was not. My transplant center did not have that requirement but knowing that I might want to dual list at some point and not wanting my weight to be a problem, definitely helped me to lose weight.
JK

REPLY
@margot69

Yes, both my parents and most all my aunts and uncles smoked. It's was common in that generation. My father quit cold turkey and an uncle quit. My mother quit after a hospital admit. She was in her 70's, which I am nearing. I just cannot wrap my head around quitting.

Jump to this post

@margot69 It was so much more common then, both of my parents smoked too, and I did until I got pregnant. By the time I quit, I was beginning to feel self-conscious about smoking. I live in the northeast but I have heard that in the south smoking is more prevalent, perhaps that's true where you are too. I think social pressure really does help if not too many people around you also smoke.
I can totally understand having trouble quitting, especially after many years. I smoked for about 10 – 12 years, I am not sure of exactly when I started!
Good luck with it, I hope you can manage to quit, you really feel better if you do.
JK

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.