Glucose Level of diabetics?

Posted by Gene Ames, Jr. @gamesjr, Mar 6, 2019

With a non fasting glucose level of 162 mg/dl, am I diabetic?

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@dorisena

Carol, I was told by my endocrinologist not to come back and she sent a letter to my primary doctor to refill my prescriptions. I was told it was because my AIC is below 7. She did not mention Medicare. My primary said the problem was probably with Medicare. My primary is now a pediatrics doctor and doesn't respond to my complaints anymore because he thinks everything is related to the diabetes and he knows I manage my own diet and exercise. I don't think he will dump me as a patient but I am worried about getting adequate care when I need it. When he did the follow up on my BP, Medicare did not pay, and my bill was huge. I paid it. It is next to impossible to get another doctor in my area if you are on Medicare. My daughter went without family care for two years until they finally found a new doctor in the area to take them as a family. She even had the help of a surgeon friend and his suggestions didn't pan out. They used new urgent care businesses for care for two years. This week I received a notice that Medicare did not pay my nursing home bill from three years ago and I needed to follow up on that or appeal the claim. I am really worried and have established a savings fund in case I have a big problem with bills in the future. I don't think it looks good financially for our future. Dorisena

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@dorisena I don't know. Maybe it's different in different states or areas. I know we check to see if doctors accept Medicare, and some do not and have that on their web sites. The only way to know is to call and ask Medicare.
Carol

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@retiredteacher

@dorisena I don't know. Maybe it's different in different states or areas. I know we check to see if doctors accept Medicare, and some do not and have that on their web sites. The only way to know is to call and ask Medicare.
Carol

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@retiredteacher @dorisena I'm amazed that finding doctors who take Medicare patients is a problem at all. Of course, I check, but I have never, ever seen a doctor around here who does not accept Medicare! Frankly, I have gotten a little lax about checking because I just assumed they all did. I will have to be more vigilant in the future. A
Are the doctors who do not accept Medicare in private practice? Around here all of the doctors are actually employees of the hospitals. Maybe that's where the difference is.
JK

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@contentandwell

@retiredteacher @dorisena I'm amazed that finding doctors who take Medicare patients is a problem at all. Of course, I check, but I have never, ever seen a doctor around here who does not accept Medicare! Frankly, I have gotten a little lax about checking because I just assumed they all did. I will have to be more vigilant in the future. A
Are the doctors who do not accept Medicare in private practice? Around here all of the doctors are actually employees of the hospitals. Maybe that's where the difference is.
JK

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@contentandwell JK, you may be right. The dr. who did not take Medicare is in a group. Apparently none of them but one will take Medicare. My PCP is in a group, but I don't know how many of them take Medicare or if all do. They are private groups, not employees of the hospital (which is more like a clinic). I don't know what's going on, but I guess the doctors decide what they will or will not accept as payment.
Carol

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@retiredteacher

@contentandwell JK, you may be right. The dr. who did not take Medicare is in a group. Apparently none of them but one will take Medicare. My PCP is in a group, but I don't know how many of them take Medicare or if all do. They are private groups, not employees of the hospital (which is more like a clinic). I don't know what's going on, but I guess the doctors decide what they will or will not accept as payment.
Carol

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@retiredteacher There are very few doctors here that are not actually employed by one of the two hospitals. There are some specialists. I know that the hematologist/oncologist I have gone to is a private practice. The PCP groups give the appearance of private practice but they are actually on the hospital's payroll, making their jobs much easier. The all basically have 9 – 5 jobs, and if a patient is sick they go to Urgent Care of the ER, or if they are in the hospital they are cared for by the hospitalists. There is only one PCP whom I know of who has a private practice and he's a concierge doctor.
Frankly, I really do not care for this structure, I think it makes for less caring doctors. It's just a 9 – 5 job for them.
JK

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@contentandwell

@retiredteacher There are very few doctors here that are not actually employed by one of the two hospitals. There are some specialists. I know that the hematologist/oncologist I have gone to is a private practice. The PCP groups give the appearance of private practice but they are actually on the hospital's payroll, making their jobs much easier. The all basically have 9 – 5 jobs, and if a patient is sick they go to Urgent Care of the ER, or if they are in the hospital they are cared for by the hospitalists. There is only one PCP whom I know of who has a private practice and he's a concierge doctor.
Frankly, I really do not care for this structure, I think it makes for less caring doctors. It's just a 9 – 5 job for them.
JK

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Going to the doctor is certainly different than it was when I was young. As I had terrible excema as a child, my father would take me to the local doctor where we would sit in a full waiting room until seen, usually about 9:00 p.m. His wife was the nurse and she brought the children with her and they were our entertainment while we waited. They would sit in the room, push the buzzer, and then run out the front door, or be ushered into a back room where they slipped out the back door and came back in the front. I never saw my father pay a bill, but he would promised to pay up when he sold the next house that he was building. When the office burned, my doctor lent me his field ultra-violet light for my rash to use at home. Then he stopped at the warehouse and bought a new office lamp on the way home from the hospital so he could give me the treatments in the back room that wasn't burned. I went to specialists in the city who tried creams that only made me worse, but eventually I saw a specialist to gave me radiation treatments that healed me temporarily. He also gave me Cortizone shots that messed up my menstration cycle and I gained weight, but recovered eventually. They didn't always have the answers but they tried everything they could, and we lived through it and eventually got the bill paid by installment. The doctor misdiagnosed my father with arthritis and he died of lung cancer a couple of months later.. He smoked so we were not surprised.
Our access problems today are based on Medicare only paying the doctors 80% of the cost of the care, which is too high anyway.
I predict that a few doctors will go back to private practice and I will be first in line to get an appointment. My son has a healthcare savings fund which is deductible, and I have started a savings account. I would like to die in style, comfortable, if possible. Dorisena

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@dorisena

Going to the doctor is certainly different than it was when I was young. As I had terrible excema as a child, my father would take me to the local doctor where we would sit in a full waiting room until seen, usually about 9:00 p.m. His wife was the nurse and she brought the children with her and they were our entertainment while we waited. They would sit in the room, push the buzzer, and then run out the front door, or be ushered into a back room where they slipped out the back door and came back in the front. I never saw my father pay a bill, but he would promised to pay up when he sold the next house that he was building. When the office burned, my doctor lent me his field ultra-violet light for my rash to use at home. Then he stopped at the warehouse and bought a new office lamp on the way home from the hospital so he could give me the treatments in the back room that wasn't burned. I went to specialists in the city who tried creams that only made me worse, but eventually I saw a specialist to gave me radiation treatments that healed me temporarily. He also gave me Cortizone shots that messed up my menstration cycle and I gained weight, but recovered eventually. They didn't always have the answers but they tried everything they could, and we lived through it and eventually got the bill paid by installment. The doctor misdiagnosed my father with arthritis and he died of lung cancer a couple of months later.. He smoked so we were not surprised.
Our access problems today are based on Medicare only paying the doctors 80% of the cost of the care, which is too high anyway.
I predict that a few doctors will go back to private practice and I will be first in line to get an appointment. My son has a healthcare savings fund which is deductible, and I have started a savings account. I would like to die in style, comfortable, if possible. Dorisena

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@dorisena The older doctors really were dedicated and cared a lot. My grandfather was a doctor. He died during a flu epidemic and he was only in his 50s. There were many, many unpaid bills but my grandmother did not collect, she just sold their big home and moved to a much smaller one. From what I have heard about him he was really a treasure.
I agree, if there were doctors in private practice I would be trying to become a patient of one of them.
JK

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@dorisena

I saw a neurologist for the tingling in my left foot and she confirmed that my toe has no feeling and nothing can be done. I exercise my feet anyway because I suspect the problem is a result of my back surgery which was really serious surgery. I wear socks in the evening and in bed until 2:00 a.m. and then take them off because I am too warm. Also my left knee has pain since the back surgery and I had no problem with the knee replacement before the surgery. The other knee replacement is fine. I don't think the diabetes is causing the tingling so long as I exercise some and wear socks for the cold feet. I am not likely to become an athlete at my age, because I never was that interested or capable. I did march in high school band, and that was it. I could sweat playing Rachmaninoff on the piano, however.
But that's about it from now on. So I refuse to have both shoulders replaced because I don't want the risk or more nerve damage.
I manage the pain most days pretty well with Icey Hot. I haven't started anything rash like Brandy or more pain pills. I don't take any over the counter pain meds at all. The best course for everything is exercise, so long as I don't fall. Then I can't get up. I call 911. It is embarrassing when I slip off a chair in my nightgown. At least my mind is staying steady. I can work two Sudocku puzzles a day. Dorisena

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I had the same experience as you but my neurologist prisribef gabapentin 2 in the morning, 2 in middle of day, 3 before bed. 100 mg each. The feeli.ng has almost gone. Can play tennis and pickle ball and don't feel it at all.
I have tried alternates you read or hear about but I almost want to say they are all scams. This is the least harmful as far as side effects are concerned than other prescription drugs.
For me there are no short term side effects.

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