Glucose Level of diabetics?

Posted by Gene Ames, Jr. @gamesjr, Mar 6, 2019

With a non fasting glucose level of 162 mg/dl, am I diabetic?

Liked by cehunt57

@dorisena I have had the same problem since I was diagnosed with Diabetes 2 on April 7, 2016, almost three years ago. I was referred to an endocrinologist who did the entire check for everything to get the starting point for treatment. I had decided that I did not want to take any medication but to control with diet and exercise. That is what I have done, but my morning numbers are still higher than what they should be. The Dr. told me my morning should be 120 or lower and the afternoon should be under 180. However, my morning numbers are rarely in line; they are in the 130's, or 140's and sometimes higher depending on what is going on in my life. I am encased in stress and that always elevates my numbers. The one thing the endo. told me was that as long as the afternoon numbers had dropped and were in range, then he would not worry. He attributes my higher morning number to my age (75). He said as we get older, our organs slow down and as long as they continue to lower by afternoon, he is not concerned. So I have higher in the morning and then the numbers drop in the afternoon. I was exercising until I developed foot neuropathy; now I am having trouble walking, but I hope to find something that will help that so that I can get back to power walking again. I know exercise helps, but it doesn't make up for age. Are you older? There are ways to be in control of diabetes and there are situations where nothing helps. As they say, "It is what it is." We just have to do the best we can and hope we make good choices. I think we all will be better in the warm sunshine and pretty days. Let me know if I can do anything to help you and just to talk.
Carol

REPLY
@retiredteacher

@dorisena I have had the same problem since I was diagnosed with Diabetes 2 on April 7, 2016, almost three years ago. I was referred to an endocrinologist who did the entire check for everything to get the starting point for treatment. I had decided that I did not want to take any medication but to control with diet and exercise. That is what I have done, but my morning numbers are still higher than what they should be. The Dr. told me my morning should be 120 or lower and the afternoon should be under 180. However, my morning numbers are rarely in line; they are in the 130's, or 140's and sometimes higher depending on what is going on in my life. I am encased in stress and that always elevates my numbers. The one thing the endo. told me was that as long as the afternoon numbers had dropped and were in range, then he would not worry. He attributes my higher morning number to my age (75). He said as we get older, our organs slow down and as long as they continue to lower by afternoon, he is not concerned. So I have higher in the morning and then the numbers drop in the afternoon. I was exercising until I developed foot neuropathy; now I am having trouble walking, but I hope to find something that will help that so that I can get back to power walking again. I know exercise helps, but it doesn't make up for age. Are you older? There are ways to be in control of diabetes and there are situations where nothing helps. As they say, "It is what it is." We just have to do the best we can and hope we make good choices. I think we all will be better in the warm sunshine and pretty days. Let me know if I can do anything to help you and just to talk.
Carol

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Oh, thank you so much for sharing your experience. It makes sense that at age 83 everything is slowing down especially since my doctor put me on those BP pills that make me sleepy. And I don't accept not being able to do everything I have always done, which is my personality. Yesterday I checked late in the day and my number was not high, so that was good news. I am still playing around with when to take the Metformin as my son's doctor gives different instructions than my endocrinologist. But I can't see her anymore, because my AIC is below 7 and that is a Medicare thing, I presume. The system doesn't want you well, I think. I am trying to figure out what besides lack of exercise causes my morning numbers to fluctuate, so I can try harder. When the garden work starts, I will be motivated to work more but I still must stop and rest often because of my back surgery. I suspect those side effects may be permanent by now because it will soon be three years since the surgery. I have never studied the kidney to check for more problems, but I may read about it a little. I know that some days I am at 105 in the morning so naturally I want to make that happen all the time. I have lost maybe five pounds in the last month but am trying not to become discouraged because loss of weight is important for BP control which my doctor is insisting upon. He shows no interest in improving my diabetes, however, and never has, for about fifteen years. Thanks for being my cheer leader, which is badly needed as I live alone, and my family says nothing. You don't need to wear a uniform for me or grab pompons, as I am happy with someone showing some interest in me.

REPLY
@dorisena

Oh, thank you so much for sharing your experience. It makes sense that at age 83 everything is slowing down especially since my doctor put me on those BP pills that make me sleepy. And I don't accept not being able to do everything I have always done, which is my personality. Yesterday I checked late in the day and my number was not high, so that was good news. I am still playing around with when to take the Metformin as my son's doctor gives different instructions than my endocrinologist. But I can't see her anymore, because my AIC is below 7 and that is a Medicare thing, I presume. The system doesn't want you well, I think. I am trying to figure out what besides lack of exercise causes my morning numbers to fluctuate, so I can try harder. When the garden work starts, I will be motivated to work more but I still must stop and rest often because of my back surgery. I suspect those side effects may be permanent by now because it will soon be three years since the surgery. I have never studied the kidney to check for more problems, but I may read about it a little. I know that some days I am at 105 in the morning so naturally I want to make that happen all the time. I have lost maybe five pounds in the last month but am trying not to become discouraged because loss of weight is important for BP control which my doctor is insisting upon. He shows no interest in improving my diabetes, however, and never has, for about fifteen years. Thanks for being my cheer leader, which is badly needed as I live alone, and my family says nothing. You don't need to wear a uniform for me or grab pompons, as I am happy with someone showing some interest in me.

Jump to this post

@dorisena Your number fluctuation does sound like mine. I have tried to figure out what causes the up and down of the numbers. I have eaten the same meal on consecutive nights and the morning numbers are different. I have been told that it depends on a variety of outside factors. It could be that I don't sleep well. Or, any number of things. I have been told also that it helps not to eat after 7:00 P.M. I tried that and it did not work either. I think it just has to do with how well my insides are working—maybe better some nights than others. I just have to go along with my endocrinologist and attribute it to my age. Exercise does help, so I tested that with a Mayo walking program that several joined me on line. Lighten Your Limbs with Friends. We walked a 12 week plan, not to lose weight but to get stronger. I did lose five pounds but I felt better and my numbers were better, so there is great benefit in exercise. I am being a cheerleader for everyone I can share my experience with. I started on Connect as a patient, and I still am a patient. I seek help and answers to questions just as you do. It's a terrific source of people who will help and be concerned. When you have your next dr. appointment ask how much difference age makes. Your working in the garden and the exercise you do is good. Remember to rest, though. Take care of yourself. If you have any more information you want to share or any questions, I hope you will let me know. Sometimes there are just no answers. We have to go with what we can and try to manage our numbers. Remember that with Diabetes, everyone is different.
So glad to hear from you.
Carol

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Carol,I am in full agreement with you that stress plays a definite role on BS levels. Due to my wife's lengthy recovery, I was for sure undergoing a condition which could be easily labeled as extremely "STRESSFUL". I always discuss in details with my primary Dr. about BS levels & my own efforts in keeping them under control!! Perhaps both of us ignored the stress I was undergoing as a cause of deterioration of BS levels.
For the last few days,I am rigidly adhering to both "Diet Control" & exercise schedules. BS is improving & fasting is now in the range of 112-130mg/dl. Next week, I have scheduled a visit to my Dr. too & will definitely bring the effect of stress on BS levels.
AH41

REPLY

My situation is this. In 2014 I had my A1C done and it was 5.9. prediabetic .
As all my finals were good and my BMI good and as I play tennis almost every my primary care Dr said continue with what you are doing and we will watch and wait. Until March 2018 my A1C was when tested about every 4 months 5.9-6.0.
Over Christmas 2018 I seamed to have cold feet. Tingling.
At endof January had my A1C tested. The Dr before the results put my cold feet down to wear warmer socks. The result was however 6.9.
He put me on 2- 500 mg metformin a day and I decided to go to a nueologist. He confirmed I had nueopothy in the feet and put me on 6- gabapentin a day.
After 3 months my A1C went down to 6.2 and glucose levels 133.
I test my blood sugar every morning, fasting and my target range is 100- 120. It has just been in range but now moving up to closer to 130 in the last week.
Have started taking cinnamon capsule twice a day . This is my 5th day. No effect yet.
Could not see a endocrinologist as my A1C below 7 and k am on Medicare. Sucks.
I watch my diet and exercise. My primary care does not believe my nueopothy is caused by diabetes. Just getting old and these things happen. I am 78.
Treating my nueopothy is another issue.
If I cannot get my blood glucose in range I may increase my metformin to a higher dose. Any comments would be appreciated.

REPLY
@dorisena

Oh, thank you so much for sharing your experience. It makes sense that at age 83 everything is slowing down especially since my doctor put me on those BP pills that make me sleepy. And I don't accept not being able to do everything I have always done, which is my personality. Yesterday I checked late in the day and my number was not high, so that was good news. I am still playing around with when to take the Metformin as my son's doctor gives different instructions than my endocrinologist. But I can't see her anymore, because my AIC is below 7 and that is a Medicare thing, I presume. The system doesn't want you well, I think. I am trying to figure out what besides lack of exercise causes my morning numbers to fluctuate, so I can try harder. When the garden work starts, I will be motivated to work more but I still must stop and rest often because of my back surgery. I suspect those side effects may be permanent by now because it will soon be three years since the surgery. I have never studied the kidney to check for more problems, but I may read about it a little. I know that some days I am at 105 in the morning so naturally I want to make that happen all the time. I have lost maybe five pounds in the last month but am trying not to become discouraged because loss of weight is important for BP control which my doctor is insisting upon. He shows no interest in improving my diabetes, however, and never has, for about fifteen years. Thanks for being my cheer leader, which is badly needed as I live alone, and my family says nothing. You don't need to wear a uniform for me or grab pompons, as I am happy with someone showing some interest in me.

Jump to this post

My remarks will address Medicare. My husband and I both go to an endocrinologist..
We both are on Medicare and have United Health Care for supplemental. Both of us are below below 7 A1C. I am concerned that so many of you have a problem. Have any of you checked with Medicare?

REPLY

@sjzreb, @daviddd I read your posts concerning Medicare, and I wonder if it's the company or the doctor. I write this because I had an incident that causes me to think it's the doctors. I also have Medicare with a supplement. We have never had any problem with Medicare, but once when I needed to see an orthopedic surgeon. We usually check the web site to see what insurance a doctor accepts or call and ask, if it's not listed. Because the appointment with this surgeon was made by my PCP with that recommendation, I didn't check. I got to the appointment, gave them my insurance cards, and went back to the examining room. The nurse came in and I told her what was going on. I waited and doc never came in. Eventually, I went out to the first nurse I saw and asked how much longer. She told me he would not be in because HE did not accept Medicare. She said one of the doctors in the group did accept Medicare, and I could make an appointment with him. I was shocked! I cannot repeat what I told her to tell the surgeon, but I left and never went back. I looked him up on the web when I got home and sure enough it said he did not accept Medicare. So, maybe it's not the insurance but the doctor. I also see an endocrinologist and my A1C is below 6.0 and Medicare pays. Has anybody else had the problem with Medicare not paying?
Carol

REPLY
@retiredteacher

@sjzreb, @daviddd I read your posts concerning Medicare, and I wonder if it's the company or the doctor. I write this because I had an incident that causes me to think it's the doctors. I also have Medicare with a supplement. We have never had any problem with Medicare, but once when I needed to see an orthopedic surgeon. We usually check the web site to see what insurance a doctor accepts or call and ask, if it's not listed. Because the appointment with this surgeon was made by my PCP with that recommendation, I didn't check. I got to the appointment, gave them my insurance cards, and went back to the examining room. The nurse came in and I told her what was going on. I waited and doc never came in. Eventually, I went out to the first nurse I saw and asked how much longer. She told me he would not be in because HE did not accept Medicare. She said one of the doctors in the group did accept Medicare, and I could make an appointment with him. I was shocked! I cannot repeat what I told her to tell the surgeon, but I left and never went back. I looked him up on the web when I got home and sure enough it said he did not accept Medicare. So, maybe it's not the insurance but the doctor. I also see an endocrinologist and my A1C is below 6.0 and Medicare pays. Has anybody else had the problem with Medicare not paying?
Carol

Jump to this post

Carol, I was told by my endocrinologist not to come back and she sent a letter to my primary doctor to refill my prescriptions. I was told it was because my AIC is below 7. She did not mention Medicare. My primary said the problem was probably with Medicare. My primary is now a pediatrics doctor and doesn't respond to my complaints anymore because he thinks everything is related to the diabetes and he knows I manage my own diet and exercise. I don't think he will dump me as a patient but I am worried about getting adequate care when I need it. When he did the follow up on my BP, Medicare did not pay, and my bill was huge. I paid it. It is next to impossible to get another doctor in my area if you are on Medicare. My daughter went without family care for two years until they finally found a new doctor in the area to take them as a family. She even had the help of a surgeon friend and his suggestions didn't pan out. They used new urgent care businesses for care for two years. This week I received a notice that Medicare did not pay my nursing home bill from three years ago and I needed to follow up on that or appeal the claim. I am really worried and have established a savings fund in case I have a big problem with bills in the future. I don't think it looks good financially for our future. Dorisena

REPLY
@daviddd

My situation is this. In 2014 I had my A1C done and it was 5.9. prediabetic .
As all my finals were good and my BMI good and as I play tennis almost every my primary care Dr said continue with what you are doing and we will watch and wait. Until March 2018 my A1C was when tested about every 4 months 5.9-6.0.
Over Christmas 2018 I seamed to have cold feet. Tingling.
At endof January had my A1C tested. The Dr before the results put my cold feet down to wear warmer socks. The result was however 6.9.
He put me on 2- 500 mg metformin a day and I decided to go to a nueologist. He confirmed I had nueopothy in the feet and put me on 6- gabapentin a day.
After 3 months my A1C went down to 6.2 and glucose levels 133.
I test my blood sugar every morning, fasting and my target range is 100- 120. It has just been in range but now moving up to closer to 130 in the last week.
Have started taking cinnamon capsule twice a day . This is my 5th day. No effect yet.
Could not see a endocrinologist as my A1C below 7 and k am on Medicare. Sucks.
I watch my diet and exercise. My primary care does not believe my nueopothy is caused by diabetes. Just getting old and these things happen. I am 78.
Treating my nueopothy is another issue.
If I cannot get my blood glucose in range I may increase my metformin to a higher dose. Any comments would be appreciated.

Jump to this post

I saw a neurologist for the tingling in my left foot and she confirmed that my toe has no feeling and nothing can be done. I exercise my feet anyway because I suspect the problem is a result of my back surgery which was really serious surgery. I wear socks in the evening and in bed until 2:00 a.m. and then take them off because I am too warm. Also my left knee has pain since the back surgery and I had no problem with the knee replacement before the surgery. The other knee replacement is fine. I don't think the diabetes is causing the tingling so long as I exercise some and wear socks for the cold feet. I am not likely to become an athlete at my age, because I never was that interested or capable. I did march in high school band, and that was it. I could sweat playing Rachmaninoff on the piano, however.
But that's about it from now on. So I refuse to have both shoulders replaced because I don't want the risk or more nerve damage.
I manage the pain most days pretty well with Icey Hot. I haven't started anything rash like Brandy or more pain pills. I don't take any over the counter pain meds at all. The best course for everything is exercise, so long as I don't fall. Then I can't get up. I call 911. It is embarrassing when I slip off a chair in my nightgown. At least my mind is staying steady. I can work two Sudocku puzzles a day. Dorisena

REPLY
@dorisena

Carol, I was told by my endocrinologist not to come back and she sent a letter to my primary doctor to refill my prescriptions. I was told it was because my AIC is below 7. She did not mention Medicare. My primary said the problem was probably with Medicare. My primary is now a pediatrics doctor and doesn't respond to my complaints anymore because he thinks everything is related to the diabetes and he knows I manage my own diet and exercise. I don't think he will dump me as a patient but I am worried about getting adequate care when I need it. When he did the follow up on my BP, Medicare did not pay, and my bill was huge. I paid it. It is next to impossible to get another doctor in my area if you are on Medicare. My daughter went without family care for two years until they finally found a new doctor in the area to take them as a family. She even had the help of a surgeon friend and his suggestions didn't pan out. They used new urgent care businesses for care for two years. This week I received a notice that Medicare did not pay my nursing home bill from three years ago and I needed to follow up on that or appeal the claim. I am really worried and have established a savings fund in case I have a big problem with bills in the future. I don't think it looks good financially for our future. Dorisena

Jump to this post

@dorisena I don't know. Maybe it's different in different states or areas. I know we check to see if doctors accept Medicare, and some do not and have that on their web sites. The only way to know is to call and ask Medicare.
Carol

REPLY
@retiredteacher

@dorisena I don't know. Maybe it's different in different states or areas. I know we check to see if doctors accept Medicare, and some do not and have that on their web sites. The only way to know is to call and ask Medicare.
Carol

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@retiredteacher @dorisena I'm amazed that finding doctors who take Medicare patients is a problem at all. Of course, I check, but I have never, ever seen a doctor around here who does not accept Medicare! Frankly, I have gotten a little lax about checking because I just assumed they all did. I will have to be more vigilant in the future. A
Are the doctors who do not accept Medicare in private practice? Around here all of the doctors are actually employees of the hospitals. Maybe that's where the difference is.
JK

REPLY
@contentandwell

@retiredteacher @dorisena I'm amazed that finding doctors who take Medicare patients is a problem at all. Of course, I check, but I have never, ever seen a doctor around here who does not accept Medicare! Frankly, I have gotten a little lax about checking because I just assumed they all did. I will have to be more vigilant in the future. A
Are the doctors who do not accept Medicare in private practice? Around here all of the doctors are actually employees of the hospitals. Maybe that's where the difference is.
JK

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@contentandwell JK, you may be right. The dr. who did not take Medicare is in a group. Apparently none of them but one will take Medicare. My PCP is in a group, but I don't know how many of them take Medicare or if all do. They are private groups, not employees of the hospital (which is more like a clinic). I don't know what's going on, but I guess the doctors decide what they will or will not accept as payment.
Carol

REPLY
@retiredteacher

@contentandwell JK, you may be right. The dr. who did not take Medicare is in a group. Apparently none of them but one will take Medicare. My PCP is in a group, but I don't know how many of them take Medicare or if all do. They are private groups, not employees of the hospital (which is more like a clinic). I don't know what's going on, but I guess the doctors decide what they will or will not accept as payment.
Carol

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@retiredteacher There are very few doctors here that are not actually employed by one of the two hospitals. There are some specialists. I know that the hematologist/oncologist I have gone to is a private practice. The PCP groups give the appearance of private practice but they are actually on the hospital's payroll, making their jobs much easier. The all basically have 9 – 5 jobs, and if a patient is sick they go to Urgent Care of the ER, or if they are in the hospital they are cared for by the hospitalists. There is only one PCP whom I know of who has a private practice and he's a concierge doctor.
Frankly, I really do not care for this structure, I think it makes for less caring doctors. It's just a 9 – 5 job for them.
JK

Liked by trishanna

REPLY
@contentandwell

@retiredteacher There are very few doctors here that are not actually employed by one of the two hospitals. There are some specialists. I know that the hematologist/oncologist I have gone to is a private practice. The PCP groups give the appearance of private practice but they are actually on the hospital's payroll, making their jobs much easier. The all basically have 9 – 5 jobs, and if a patient is sick they go to Urgent Care of the ER, or if they are in the hospital they are cared for by the hospitalists. There is only one PCP whom I know of who has a private practice and he's a concierge doctor.
Frankly, I really do not care for this structure, I think it makes for less caring doctors. It's just a 9 – 5 job for them.
JK

Jump to this post

Going to the doctor is certainly different than it was when I was young. As I had terrible excema as a child, my father would take me to the local doctor where we would sit in a full waiting room until seen, usually about 9:00 p.m. His wife was the nurse and she brought the children with her and they were our entertainment while we waited. They would sit in the room, push the buzzer, and then run out the front door, or be ushered into a back room where they slipped out the back door and came back in the front. I never saw my father pay a bill, but he would promised to pay up when he sold the next house that he was building. When the office burned, my doctor lent me his field ultra-violet light for my rash to use at home. Then he stopped at the warehouse and bought a new office lamp on the way home from the hospital so he could give me the treatments in the back room that wasn't burned. I went to specialists in the city who tried creams that only made me worse, but eventually I saw a specialist to gave me radiation treatments that healed me temporarily. He also gave me Cortizone shots that messed up my menstration cycle and I gained weight, but recovered eventually. They didn't always have the answers but they tried everything they could, and we lived through it and eventually got the bill paid by installment. The doctor misdiagnosed my father with arthritis and he died of lung cancer a couple of months later.. He smoked so we were not surprised.
Our access problems today are based on Medicare only paying the doctors 80% of the cost of the care, which is too high anyway.
I predict that a few doctors will go back to private practice and I will be first in line to get an appointment. My son has a healthcare savings fund which is deductible, and I have started a savings account. I would like to die in style, comfortable, if possible. Dorisena

REPLY
@dorisena

Going to the doctor is certainly different than it was when I was young. As I had terrible excema as a child, my father would take me to the local doctor where we would sit in a full waiting room until seen, usually about 9:00 p.m. His wife was the nurse and she brought the children with her and they were our entertainment while we waited. They would sit in the room, push the buzzer, and then run out the front door, or be ushered into a back room where they slipped out the back door and came back in the front. I never saw my father pay a bill, but he would promised to pay up when he sold the next house that he was building. When the office burned, my doctor lent me his field ultra-violet light for my rash to use at home. Then he stopped at the warehouse and bought a new office lamp on the way home from the hospital so he could give me the treatments in the back room that wasn't burned. I went to specialists in the city who tried creams that only made me worse, but eventually I saw a specialist to gave me radiation treatments that healed me temporarily. He also gave me Cortizone shots that messed up my menstration cycle and I gained weight, but recovered eventually. They didn't always have the answers but they tried everything they could, and we lived through it and eventually got the bill paid by installment. The doctor misdiagnosed my father with arthritis and he died of lung cancer a couple of months later.. He smoked so we were not surprised.
Our access problems today are based on Medicare only paying the doctors 80% of the cost of the care, which is too high anyway.
I predict that a few doctors will go back to private practice and I will be first in line to get an appointment. My son has a healthcare savings fund which is deductible, and I have started a savings account. I would like to die in style, comfortable, if possible. Dorisena

Jump to this post

@dorisena The older doctors really were dedicated and cared a lot. My grandfather was a doctor. He died during a flu epidemic and he was only in his 50s. There were many, many unpaid bills but my grandmother did not collect, she just sold their big home and moved to a much smaller one. From what I have heard about him he was really a treasure.
I agree, if there were doctors in private practice I would be trying to become a patient of one of them.
JK

Liked by trishanna

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