What are the financial challenges after transplant with medicare?

Posted by willie0027 @willie0027, Nov 8, 2019

What financial challenges are there after a transplant and medicare

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Hi @willie0027 and welcome to Connect. I'd like to bring @danab into this conversation as he may have some experiences to share with you. Willie, can you explain a bit more? It sounds like you're planning ahead to know what medical costs to expect after transplant and to distinguish what "hidden" costs may not be covered by Medicare. Is that about right?

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@willie0027 hi Willie. I too welcome you to Connect.
After transplant, and before also, the financial challenges depend greatly on your insurance coverage. I have Medicare and one of the best supplement plans, plus Medicare D for drug coverage. I have to pay very little, mainly some small co-pays on some drugs -not the immunosuppressants. The immunosuppressants are covered under Medicare B, with the remaining cost paid by the supplemental.
From what I understand, the drugs can be very costly if you do not have coverage.
JK

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You’re not alone in inquiring about financial coverage for a transplant. Here is information from United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) – How can I cover transplant costs?
"Some transplant candidates and recipients have difficulty affording the cost of a transplant or related expenses such as travel, lodging and post-transplant medications. There are a number of local, regional and national organizations that provide some assistance through grants or services. In individual cases, local community organizations or faith groups may be able to help, and friends and families may solicit funds through public events or appeals. Every transplant program has a social worker or financial coordinator who can work with you and advise you on insurance and funding options."

To read more about basic costs (medical and nonmedical), insurance basics, financial assistance and resources you can click on this lin
https://transplantliving.org/financing-a-transplant/
@willie0027, Have you met with your transplant team, yet? You will have a counselor, or social worker, or finincial advisor (depending on how your transplant center has it set up) and they can help you with your individual situation.

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@colleenyoung

Hi @willie0027 and welcome to Connect. I'd like to bring @danab into this conversation as he may have some experiences to share with you. Willie, can you explain a bit more? It sounds like you're planning ahead to know what medical costs to expect after transplant and to distinguish what "hidden" costs may not be covered by Medicare. Is that about right?

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Hello Colleen, I've had the transplant in July but I'm going to retire this December. Right now I'm not paying any major bills for follow up treatments because of my insurance, but all that will change when I retire and flip over to Medicare. So I'm trying to get my mind set on and estimate on what my cost my be. By the way my stomach has been numb since the surgery, how long does that last?

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@contentandwell

@willie0027 hi Willie. I too welcome you to Connect.
After transplant, and before also, the financial challenges depend greatly on your insurance coverage. I have Medicare and one of the best supplement plans, plus Medicare D for drug coverage. I have to pay very little, mainly some small co-pays on some drugs -not the immunosuppressants. The immunosuppressants are covered under Medicare B, with the remaining cost paid by the supplemental.
From what I understand, the drugs can be very costly if you do not have coverage.
JK

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Thank you

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@rosemarya

You’re not alone in inquiring about financial coverage for a transplant. Here is information from United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) – How can I cover transplant costs?
"Some transplant candidates and recipients have difficulty affording the cost of a transplant or related expenses such as travel, lodging and post-transplant medications. There are a number of local, regional and national organizations that provide some assistance through grants or services. In individual cases, local community organizations or faith groups may be able to help, and friends and families may solicit funds through public events or appeals. Every transplant program has a social worker or financial coordinator who can work with you and advise you on insurance and funding options."

To read more about basic costs (medical and nonmedical), insurance basics, financial assistance and resources you can click on this lin
https://transplantliving.org/financing-a-transplant/
@willie0027, Have you met with your transplant team, yet? You will have a counselor, or social worker, or finincial advisor (depending on how your transplant center has it set up) and they can help you with your individual situation.

Jump to this post

Thank you for your reply

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@willie0027

Hello Colleen, I've had the transplant in July but I'm going to retire this December. Right now I'm not paying any major bills for follow up treatments because of my insurance, but all that will change when I retire and flip over to Medicare. So I'm trying to get my mind set on and estimate on what my cost my be. By the way my stomach has been numb since the surgery, how long does that last?

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@willie0027 hi there. Just a note on your question as to how long the numbness lasts on your stomach. I am coming up to my 1 year anniversary and I still can't feel anything across my abdomen. The doctors told me that I may never get back any sensation in my abdomen as nerves may have been cut during surgery. I can run my fingernails across my stomach and not feel a thing. Not everyone has this but I do. It's very strange but a small price to pay after surgery.

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@gaylea1

@willie0027 hi there. Just a note on your question as to how long the numbness lasts on your stomach. I am coming up to my 1 year anniversary and I still can't feel anything across my abdomen. The doctors told me that I may never get back any sensation in my abdomen as nerves may have been cut during surgery. I can run my fingernails across my stomach and not feel a thing. Not everyone has this but I do. It's very strange but a small price to pay after surgery.

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While I’ve not yet even gotten on a transplant list, in the mid-eighties my gallbladder was removed through a huge slice across my right abdomen (perhaps similar to a transplant). I’ve had no feeling below the scar since.

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@skipmarsliver

While I’ve not yet even gotten on a transplant list, in the mid-eighties my gallbladder was removed through a huge slice across my right abdomen (perhaps similar to a transplant). I’ve had no feeling below the scar since.

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No feeling for me either. My transplant surgery was 10 years ago. I have become used to it – it is my new normal.

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@willie0027

Hello Colleen, I've had the transplant in July but I'm going to retire this December. Right now I'm not paying any major bills for follow up treatments because of my insurance, but all that will change when I retire and flip over to Medicare. So I'm trying to get my mind set on and estimate on what my cost my be. By the way my stomach has been numb since the surgery, how long does that last?

Jump to this post

@willie0027 @gaylea1 @skipmarsliver @rosemarya I have no numbness and never did! My incision healed very quickly and with no discomfort. I credit my surgeon for that, to me he’s the best surgeon on the planet! I’m sure all of the transplant surgeons at top hospitals are incredible but in my mind, he is the best! 😁. I feel fortunate that the luck of the draw made him the one who did my transplant.
JK

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