Feeling heart beat, skipped beats through skin

Posted by jadillow @jadillow, Mon, Oct 21 7:27pm

When I have chest discomfort (almost like a quick pencil stabbing) in place my finger on the spot of pain and can feel my heartbeat in that spot. Is this normal?

Jadillow….your doctor took you off omeprazole, but what did he suggest you take in it's place? Is he the one who recommended the Tums? I also wonder why he is apparently not addressing your anxiety…….which is a two way street. Anxiety can lead to stomach issues and stomach issues can trigger anxiety. It's been my experience for more than 50 years that if you don't "treat" both conditions, you'll always end up back at square one. There is no reason why anyone should have to "truck through" life suffering anxiety. Between medications and therapy, it is a highly treatable condition. I know you have had a number of tests for the chest pains, and those tests were showed nothing other than the bradycardia. It has been suggested by a couple of us that you learn about this condition. Here is the link to the Cleveland Clinics site regarding bradycardia: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/17841-bradycardia
I hope you will take the time to read it so you will have a fairly complete understanding of the condition. If you have questions/concerns while reading this information, jot down questions to ask your cardiologist at your next visit. Discuss your anxiety and what can be done to alleviate it. I understand all too well how easily SOME doctors WILL dismiss anxiety as more of a "character flaw" than a very real medical issues that needs to be treated along with other conditions. Perhaps a short course of a benzodiazepam (anti-anxiety med) would benefit you in a number of ways. Most doctors are as reluctant to prescribe these types of meds now as they are of opioids. But a short course of a mild benzo for 4-6 weeks could be enough to see if your symptoms improve when the anxiety is removed from the equation. There are also many excellent books available to help you understand and deal with anxiety, and these could prove useful for you as well. Just as you joined this forum to help with your heart issues, there are many good forums that can help and support you with anxiety. I believe the Mayo Clinic also has such a forum. If not, I can highly recommend MedHelp. Your posture at work can definitely play havoc with back and neck pain. headache, eye strain and many other issues. It is recommended that if you work at a computer all day, to invest in a pair of UV blocking glasses which help with eye strain and headaches. (If you wear glasses, they have clip on lenses) I began using these as I spend hours on the computer and my migraines have decreased remarkably. They also suggest that even if you use the UV blocking glasses, that every 1/2 hour, you should take about 5 minutes and focus your eyes on the distance. Ideally, if you can look out a window is the best, but even if you just look across the room, this will give your eyes a chance to "relax" and ease the stress of what they call "tight focus," meaning staring at your screen for hours on end. You should also get up and walk around at least once an hour for the same reason they suggest you do this on a long flight. You don't have to go for a hike…….just a couple minutes walking around your office space or up and down the hallway will get the blood flowing. It's good for every system in your body. I've said this before but I'll say it again…..if you are not happy with how you are being treated by your doctor(s) both professionally and personally, find a new doctor! Look for one who has a more "integrative" approach……..someone who takes the "whole you" into the picture, not just your symptom. And in regards to this feeling in your upper back like "a fist," I suggest you bring that to your doctors attention soon. Yes, it COULD be related to your GERD or to gallbladder issues, but unless those "other folks" who have given you suggestions about what it could be are doctors, you need to see a REAL one, not someone who plays one on TV! We must be our own advocates these days and while doctors DO deserve respect, as we ALL do, respect and trust must be earned.

Liked by lucky1038

REPLY
@rubywitch67

Jadillow….your doctor took you off omeprazole, but what did he suggest you take in it's place? Is he the one who recommended the Tums? I also wonder why he is apparently not addressing your anxiety…….which is a two way street. Anxiety can lead to stomach issues and stomach issues can trigger anxiety. It's been my experience for more than 50 years that if you don't "treat" both conditions, you'll always end up back at square one. There is no reason why anyone should have to "truck through" life suffering anxiety. Between medications and therapy, it is a highly treatable condition. I know you have had a number of tests for the chest pains, and those tests were showed nothing other than the bradycardia. It has been suggested by a couple of us that you learn about this condition. Here is the link to the Cleveland Clinics site regarding bradycardia: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/17841-bradycardia
I hope you will take the time to read it so you will have a fairly complete understanding of the condition. If you have questions/concerns while reading this information, jot down questions to ask your cardiologist at your next visit. Discuss your anxiety and what can be done to alleviate it. I understand all too well how easily SOME doctors WILL dismiss anxiety as more of a "character flaw" than a very real medical issues that needs to be treated along with other conditions. Perhaps a short course of a benzodiazepam (anti-anxiety med) would benefit you in a number of ways. Most doctors are as reluctant to prescribe these types of meds now as they are of opioids. But a short course of a mild benzo for 4-6 weeks could be enough to see if your symptoms improve when the anxiety is removed from the equation. There are also many excellent books available to help you understand and deal with anxiety, and these could prove useful for you as well. Just as you joined this forum to help with your heart issues, there are many good forums that can help and support you with anxiety. I believe the Mayo Clinic also has such a forum. If not, I can highly recommend MedHelp. Your posture at work can definitely play havoc with back and neck pain. headache, eye strain and many other issues. It is recommended that if you work at a computer all day, to invest in a pair of UV blocking glasses which help with eye strain and headaches. (If you wear glasses, they have clip on lenses) I began using these as I spend hours on the computer and my migraines have decreased remarkably. They also suggest that even if you use the UV blocking glasses, that every 1/2 hour, you should take about 5 minutes and focus your eyes on the distance. Ideally, if you can look out a window is the best, but even if you just look across the room, this will give your eyes a chance to "relax" and ease the stress of what they call "tight focus," meaning staring at your screen for hours on end. You should also get up and walk around at least once an hour for the same reason they suggest you do this on a long flight. You don't have to go for a hike…….just a couple minutes walking around your office space or up and down the hallway will get the blood flowing. It's good for every system in your body. I've said this before but I'll say it again…..if you are not happy with how you are being treated by your doctor(s) both professionally and personally, find a new doctor! Look for one who has a more "integrative" approach……..someone who takes the "whole you" into the picture, not just your symptom. And in regards to this feeling in your upper back like "a fist," I suggest you bring that to your doctors attention soon. Yes, it COULD be related to your GERD or to gallbladder issues, but unless those "other folks" who have given you suggestions about what it could be are doctors, you need to see a REAL one, not someone who plays one on TV! We must be our own advocates these days and while doctors DO deserve respect, as we ALL do, respect and trust must be earned.

Jump to this post

Thank you very much and I will read up on this. Crazy thing is this is my second doctor. I left the first one because I wasn’t getting any answers. I was put on various anti anxiety medicines and I felt they were not helping. I have been sent for endo scop. Stress test and heart scan. Also had a Hidascam done and all of the specialists say everything they saw looked good. My main concern at this time is the chest pain, which could be stomach or anything I’m sure. It’s been so long off an on I assumed if it were my heart something would have happened by now. Just trying to live my life as I’m only 36 and be there for my wife and kids and I dress her out with this as well just because I’m always worried something sudden will happen. I feel as if I’m staying in top of it buy being so aware but at the same time I think that’s hurting me as well. The chest pains aren’t squeezing. Nor are they hard to deal with. More like pricks here and here and just makes me aware

REPLY

I don't know your level of activity but if it isn't good, I think that becoming more active will get your muscles in your whole body including your chest muscles moving…and they will be less inclined to tighten up and give you those sharp sensations…that we have all experienced. Bicycle with the kids, throw a basketball or baseball with them and wrestle. I'm sure the pricks will stop. Also drink more water (never soda) and take your daily magnesium tablet at bedtime. You're only 36 so I wouldn't worry if your doctors are not concerned.

Liked by jadillow, lucky1038

REPLY
@rubywitch67

Jadillow….your doctor took you off omeprazole, but what did he suggest you take in it's place? Is he the one who recommended the Tums? I also wonder why he is apparently not addressing your anxiety…….which is a two way street. Anxiety can lead to stomach issues and stomach issues can trigger anxiety. It's been my experience for more than 50 years that if you don't "treat" both conditions, you'll always end up back at square one. There is no reason why anyone should have to "truck through" life suffering anxiety. Between medications and therapy, it is a highly treatable condition. I know you have had a number of tests for the chest pains, and those tests were showed nothing other than the bradycardia. It has been suggested by a couple of us that you learn about this condition. Here is the link to the Cleveland Clinics site regarding bradycardia: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/17841-bradycardia
I hope you will take the time to read it so you will have a fairly complete understanding of the condition. If you have questions/concerns while reading this information, jot down questions to ask your cardiologist at your next visit. Discuss your anxiety and what can be done to alleviate it. I understand all too well how easily SOME doctors WILL dismiss anxiety as more of a "character flaw" than a very real medical issues that needs to be treated along with other conditions. Perhaps a short course of a benzodiazepam (anti-anxiety med) would benefit you in a number of ways. Most doctors are as reluctant to prescribe these types of meds now as they are of opioids. But a short course of a mild benzo for 4-6 weeks could be enough to see if your symptoms improve when the anxiety is removed from the equation. There are also many excellent books available to help you understand and deal with anxiety, and these could prove useful for you as well. Just as you joined this forum to help with your heart issues, there are many good forums that can help and support you with anxiety. I believe the Mayo Clinic also has such a forum. If not, I can highly recommend MedHelp. Your posture at work can definitely play havoc with back and neck pain. headache, eye strain and many other issues. It is recommended that if you work at a computer all day, to invest in a pair of UV blocking glasses which help with eye strain and headaches. (If you wear glasses, they have clip on lenses) I began using these as I spend hours on the computer and my migraines have decreased remarkably. They also suggest that even if you use the UV blocking glasses, that every 1/2 hour, you should take about 5 minutes and focus your eyes on the distance. Ideally, if you can look out a window is the best, but even if you just look across the room, this will give your eyes a chance to "relax" and ease the stress of what they call "tight focus," meaning staring at your screen for hours on end. You should also get up and walk around at least once an hour for the same reason they suggest you do this on a long flight. You don't have to go for a hike…….just a couple minutes walking around your office space or up and down the hallway will get the blood flowing. It's good for every system in your body. I've said this before but I'll say it again…..if you are not happy with how you are being treated by your doctor(s) both professionally and personally, find a new doctor! Look for one who has a more "integrative" approach……..someone who takes the "whole you" into the picture, not just your symptom. And in regards to this feeling in your upper back like "a fist," I suggest you bring that to your doctors attention soon. Yes, it COULD be related to your GERD or to gallbladder issues, but unless those "other folks" who have given you suggestions about what it could be are doctors, you need to see a REAL one, not someone who plays one on TV! We must be our own advocates these days and while doctors DO deserve respect, as we ALL do, respect and trust must be earned.

Jump to this post

I would like to add that managing lifestyle can treat so many conditions. And anxiety is definitely one of them. Working out, going for a walk every day, getting therapy can alleviate so much stress as can taking magnesium. Google: Psychology Today – The Chill Pill. Very interesting article….and no drugs are involved! Magnesium is a mineral that today is lacking in our soil…therefore this results in magnesium depleted vegetables. Getting a good night's sleep is key. Also having good relationships with your children/wife/family/friends, eating well lowering carb intake for overall general good health.. There is so much one can do to alleviate anxiety before grabbing the pill bottle. Drugs should be your last option.

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I agree with AFRobin in her approach to trying lifestyle changes before adding yet another prescription medication to your plate. I, too, believe drugs should be your last option. I just want to say that when, and if, dugs ARE the last option, do not feel guilty or that you have failed in your attempt to improve your condition, and therefore, your health, by turning to pharmaceuticals. Sometimes, unfortunately, we simply have no choice. Case in point…….I have a condition known as hyperlipidemia, this means that no matter how careful and diligent I am about watching my levels of cholesterol, my body produces too much cholesterol. When my lipid panels kept coming back with really bad numbers, my doctor said I needed to go on a very strong statin. I really wanted to avoid that for obvious reason. I was sent for a consult with a nutritionist to help me lower my cholesterol. I was put on a diet for 6 months that I didn't think would even keep a rabbit alive. But I was determined to stay off statins, so I followed that diet religiously. At the end of the 6 months, I had another lipid panel drawn and my LDL (the "bad" cholesterol) numbers had actually gone up! I already had 2 cardiac stents and it was decided that in MY case, there really was no other course of action besides going on the statins. I have been on a very high dose for several years now, my cholesterol levers are nearly normal and my cardiologist is keeping very close watch on my liver function, which so far, knock on wood, has remained very minimally elevated. I wrote this only as an example that SOMETIMES, even when we try our hardest to correct a medical issue naturally, there will be times it simply is not enough and we must rely on medication for optimum health. This does not mean that you should skip any lifestyle changes you've made. I still stick to the ultra-low cholesterol diet the nutritionist put me on, but I DO cheat now and again. Which I see as one of the dangers of believing if we're taking a pill to keep the condition under control, then we can just stop trying to help ourselves…….and that's NOT how it works.

Liked by sue225, lucky1038

REPLY
@rubywitch67

I agree with AFRobin in her approach to trying lifestyle changes before adding yet another prescription medication to your plate. I, too, believe drugs should be your last option. I just want to say that when, and if, dugs ARE the last option, do not feel guilty or that you have failed in your attempt to improve your condition, and therefore, your health, by turning to pharmaceuticals. Sometimes, unfortunately, we simply have no choice. Case in point…….I have a condition known as hyperlipidemia, this means that no matter how careful and diligent I am about watching my levels of cholesterol, my body produces too much cholesterol. When my lipid panels kept coming back with really bad numbers, my doctor said I needed to go on a very strong statin. I really wanted to avoid that for obvious reason. I was sent for a consult with a nutritionist to help me lower my cholesterol. I was put on a diet for 6 months that I didn't think would even keep a rabbit alive. But I was determined to stay off statins, so I followed that diet religiously. At the end of the 6 months, I had another lipid panel drawn and my LDL (the "bad" cholesterol) numbers had actually gone up! I already had 2 cardiac stents and it was decided that in MY case, there really was no other course of action besides going on the statins. I have been on a very high dose for several years now, my cholesterol levers are nearly normal and my cardiologist is keeping very close watch on my liver function, which so far, knock on wood, has remained very minimally elevated. I wrote this only as an example that SOMETIMES, even when we try our hardest to correct a medical issue naturally, there will be times it simply is not enough and we must rely on medication for optimum health. This does not mean that you should skip any lifestyle changes you've made. I still stick to the ultra-low cholesterol diet the nutritionist put me on, but I DO cheat now and again. Which I see as one of the dangers of believing if we're taking a pill to keep the condition under control, then we can just stop trying to help ourselves…….and that's NOT how it works.

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What’s a good recommendation for this diet as I also want to lower my blood pressure as well. I just don’t know where to start ?

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@jadillow

What’s a good recommendation for this diet as I also want to lower my blood pressure as well. I just don’t know where to start ?

Jump to this post

The DASH diet for lowering bp has been around for ages. Cut out salt.

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@jadillow

What’s a good recommendation for this diet as I also want to lower my blood pressure as well. I just don’t know where to start ?

Jump to this post

You can Google The American Heart Association and download recipes. I think they also sell some inexpensive recipe books. If you can't find any or they are too expensive, write me and I'll give you mine.

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@sue225

The DASH diet for lowering bp has been around for ages. Cut out salt.

Jump to this post

Sue……my cardiologist recently put me on a low salt diet. WOW! It is SO hard since everything is loaded with sodium. Even if it says "Low Sodium," the amount will still shock you. Eating everything "fresh" is the easiest way, besides hiding your salt shaker, but buying fresh can get really expensive. I just bought a book from Amazon called "The Low-Sodium Diet Plan" by Christopher Lower. (There are SO many to choose from!) I like his slow cooker recipes! It was published in 2017 and I got it used for under $10 which included S&H. I'm 68 and have never had to watch my salt intake before and this book is a great primer for the novice and "saltaholics!"

Liked by sue225, lucky1038

REPLY

Hi Ruby Witch!
Oh boy! You've hit a raw nerve. I am SO anti-statin, you cannot imagine.
Here is Canada we have a documentary program which cannot be seen in the US. It's called The Nature of Things with renowned scientist, Dr. David Suzuki. Last year, they broadcast a documentary on cholesterol and statins with interviews with the top cholesterol/statin research scientists in the country. So this is not my opinion. The bottom line is that ONLY A MAN IN HIS FORTIES WHO HAS HAD A HEART ATTACK should be on statins.
My husband has had high LDL/bad cholesterol since his twenties or even earlier… (but always excellent, good HDL cholesterol I think because his diet is high in vegetables). After watching the documentary with me 3 times just to be sure of what we were learning, he was convinced not to take statins.
If you go on the Mayo Clinic site you can read that statins can cause diabetes, muscle wasting, liver problems that require monitoring every 6 months (and for which you need to take CoQ10 to protect the liver) and memory loss. And this is just what happened to my husband's sister who also has high cholesterol and took statins for years even at age 80 when even the American Heart Association sets the statin bar at age 75..
Let's face it, a doctor who does not do as Big Pharma says, can get him or herself into a lot of hot water.
A very experienced pharmacist friend told me that years ago 'normal' cholesterol was set at a particular level and it was recommended that anyone with a higher rating, take statins. Then Big Pharma lowered 'normal' and more people needed to be put on statins. Then Big Pharma lowered 'normal' a 3rd time so that now almost half of the elderly (who should especially not be on statins) are taking statins.
My husband tried to lower his cholesterol through diet; principally through a very high fibre breakfast. His numbers slowly went down into the normal range but again slowly went back up even though he kept up with his super fibre breakfast. He was always a walker but then began walking at least 10 km per day and as many as 25 km (maybe 16 miles) per day. His numbers are closer to Big Pharma's latest 'normal' range.
Cholesterol readings are passé. What is important now is your c-reactive protein levels which indicate inflammation in the body. On Web-MD it states: A recent study found that elevated levels of C-reactive protein were associated with three-times-greater risk of a heart attack. How is your c-reactive protein levels, Ruby Witch? My cholesterol is in the newest normal range but I could do better with my c-reactive protein levels and have to work on it with a more Mediterranean, high vegetable diet, plenty of vitamin C and fibre++. If I had high cholesterol like my husband I would not touch statins with a 10 foot pole.

Liked by lucky1038

REPLY
@afrobin

Hi Ruby Witch!
Oh boy! You've hit a raw nerve. I am SO anti-statin, you cannot imagine.
Here is Canada we have a documentary program which cannot be seen in the US. It's called The Nature of Things with renowned scientist, Dr. David Suzuki. Last year, they broadcast a documentary on cholesterol and statins with interviews with the top cholesterol/statin research scientists in the country. So this is not my opinion. The bottom line is that ONLY A MAN IN HIS FORTIES WHO HAS HAD A HEART ATTACK should be on statins.
My husband has had high LDL/bad cholesterol since his twenties or even earlier… (but always excellent, good HDL cholesterol I think because his diet is high in vegetables). After watching the documentary with me 3 times just to be sure of what we were learning, he was convinced not to take statins.
If you go on the Mayo Clinic site you can read that statins can cause diabetes, muscle wasting, liver problems that require monitoring every 6 months (and for which you need to take CoQ10 to protect the liver) and memory loss. And this is just what happened to my husband's sister who also has high cholesterol and took statins for years even at age 80 when even the American Heart Association sets the statin bar at age 75..
Let's face it, a doctor who does not do as Big Pharma says, can get him or herself into a lot of hot water.
A very experienced pharmacist friend told me that years ago 'normal' cholesterol was set at a particular level and it was recommended that anyone with a higher rating, take statins. Then Big Pharma lowered 'normal' and more people needed to be put on statins. Then Big Pharma lowered 'normal' a 3rd time so that now almost half of the elderly (who should especially not be on statins) are taking statins.
My husband tried to lower his cholesterol through diet; principally through a very high fibre breakfast. His numbers slowly went down into the normal range but again slowly went back up even though he kept up with his super fibre breakfast. He was always a walker but then began walking at least 10 km per day and as many as 25 km (maybe 16 miles) per day. His numbers are closer to Big Pharma's latest 'normal' range.
Cholesterol readings are passé. What is important now is your c-reactive protein levels which indicate inflammation in the body. On Web-MD it states: A recent study found that elevated levels of C-reactive protein were associated with three-times-greater risk of a heart attack. How is your c-reactive protein levels, Ruby Witch? My cholesterol is in the newest normal range but I could do better with my c-reactive protein levels and have to work on it with a more Mediterranean, high vegetable diet, plenty of vitamin C and fibre++. If I had high cholesterol like my husband I would not touch statins with a 10 foot pole.

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Hi AFRobin……..just wanted to let you know I got your statin post, read through it quickly, but we're having company for dinner so can't give it the attention I want to right now. I will read this again (and again and again) tomorrow. I want to try, somehow, and get that documentary you talked about! I'm know I'm going to have a long talk with my cardio during my next 6th month visit. I need to figure out where and how my hyperlipidemia fits into all this………and without digging through all my medical files, I don't know what my C-reactive protein level is. You've given me much food for thought. I'll be back in touch soon. How old is your husband if you don't mind my asking.
Again, thanks for this post!
Ruby
(I was born in Winnipeg!)

Liked by lucky1038

REPLY
@rubywitch67

Sue……my cardiologist recently put me on a low salt diet. WOW! It is SO hard since everything is loaded with sodium. Even if it says "Low Sodium," the amount will still shock you. Eating everything "fresh" is the easiest way, besides hiding your salt shaker, but buying fresh can get really expensive. I just bought a book from Amazon called "The Low-Sodium Diet Plan" by Christopher Lower. (There are SO many to choose from!) I like his slow cooker recipes! It was published in 2017 and I got it used for under $10 which included S&H. I'm 68 and have never had to watch my salt intake before and this book is a great primer for the novice and "saltaholics!"

Jump to this post

Hide your salt shakers. There are more and more low sodium products available in the grocery store now. Lots of vegetables and fruits and yogourt.

Liked by lucky1038

REPLY

What about canned veggies such as peas, corn, green beans?

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@jadillow

What about canned veggies such as peas, corn, green beans?

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No, canned vegetables contain sodium. Frozen vegetables, on the other hand, don't. It is the potassium in vegetables and fruits that help the kidneys get rid of sodium through the urine which in turn lowers b.p.
Leafy greens (e.g. spinach, romaine lettuce, kale ) are high in potassium.

Liked by lucky1038, kimut71

REPLY
@jadillow

What about canned veggies such as peas, corn, green beans?

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jadillow…anything that is "preserved" and that includes canned fruits and vegetables, contain a ton of sodium. You must become an avid label reader!!!! You will be as shocked as I was when you realize how much sodium is in things you wouldn't normally suspect.

Liked by danab

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