Feeding tube falls out.

Posted by walisky @walisky, Aug 19, 2019

Does anyone else have a problem with their feeding tube balloon deflating and the tube falling out? It has to be replaced at the emergency room about every 3 months. We can't leave town because we worry that this will happen while we are on the road. Thanks.

@colleenyoung

@walisky, did you get an response from your doctor regarding a permanent feeding tube solution for your husband?

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Not yet. If we don't hear after Christmas, we'll call again. Thanks for asking.

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@colleenyoung

@walisky, did you get an response from your doctor regarding a permanent feeding tube solution for your husband?

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Can someone please remove me from this thread?

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@h2ohead

Can someone please remove me from this thread?

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Hello, @h2ohead – you will find instructions on how to unsubscribe from a discussion on the Get Started on Connect page https://connect.mayoclinic.org/get-started-on-connect/.

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My sister is having difficulties with the deflation of balloon on her feeding tube resulting in the feeding tube falling out. Any similar problems and/or solutions?

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Hello @ice8plus1, welcome to Connect. You may notice I moved your discussion and combined it with an existing discussion titled, "Feeding tube falls out." I did this so you could meet the members already discussing a similar issue that your sister is experiencing and so you could go back and read some of their previous posts as well. If you are replying by email, click on VIEW & REPLY at the bottom of the notification to see where your discussion is now located and to read previous posts.

@ice8plus1, has your sister brought this issue to the attention of her provider and have they offered any possible reasons or solutions?

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@colleenyoung

@walisky, did you get an response from your doctor regarding a permanent feeding tube solution for your husband?

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My husband's doctor whose field is gastroenterology agrees that the balloon type of feeding tube isn't working out. He has ordered a different type. It will not have a long tube that sticks out so he will not need a pouch to hold it in place. I assume that means there will be a tube that will be attached for every feeding. The best news for me is that my husband will not be "put under" for the procedure. He will place it at the local hospital. We are looking forward to no more 2:30 am trips to the emergency room. This is another example of why it is important to personally research any problem and not wait for the doctors to bring it up. Another example is that I had researched new medications and found a new one that has been an incredible (though very expensive) treatment for his asthma.

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@colleenyoung

@walisky, did you get an response from your doctor regarding a permanent feeding tube solution for your husband?

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The new feeding tube has been installed. It is a "button" type and it took very little time and effort to be put in. It has been great. He no longer needs to wear a pouch to keep the tube from hanging because the tube part is only clicked on while feeding. So much freedom. No worrying about rolling over the tube in bed. After feeding, I wash out the tube with water and let it dry until the next feeding. It should last for a long, long, time and the hospital has a spare just in case as this isn't something that they normally keep in stock.

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@walisky

The new feeding tube has been installed. It is a "button" type and it took very little time and effort to be put in. It has been great. He no longer needs to wear a pouch to keep the tube from hanging because the tube part is only clicked on while feeding. So much freedom. No worrying about rolling over the tube in bed. After feeding, I wash out the tube with water and let it dry until the next feeding. It should last for a long, long, time and the hospital has a spare just in case as this isn't something that they normally keep in stock.

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This is great news, @walisky. I wonder why the button type wasn't used in the first place. Well I'm glad you've got it now. How has it been working this past week?

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@colleenyoung

This is great news, @walisky. I wonder why the button type wasn't used in the first place. Well I'm glad you've got it now. How has it been working this past week?

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It's been great. One change has been that I am adding three syringes of water to each container of feeding tube food instead of the two I was taught to use. With this type of feeding tube, the food goes down easier with the additional water. My husband is so glad that he no longer has to wear a pouch for the feeding tube. I like that I can wash out the tube after every feeding and let it air dry.
Again, research and trial and error are important.
Thanks for asking.

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Hi everyone. I know I'm late coming to this discussion but I did have a feeding tube for a couple years and it did fall out several times. Each time I ended up hospitalized for several days after going to an ER. The first time it happened I lost consciousness and my wife called 911 because I appeared to be having a seizure. (I got tested and it turned out the fainting and "seizure" were apparently just some kind of anxiety attack because the test found no evidence of neurological problems.)

The second time I "lost" my tube it was because a silly black cat named Tex was sitting on my lap while I was connected to the feeding pump. Tex decided he wanted to do a dramatic dismount and leap onto the floor but he got tangled up in the feeding line and pulled the j tube right out of my abdomen. And it didn't hurt at all. In fact, I never noticed any pain when the tubes fell out.

On average, it seemed like I was going to the ER every six months to get a tube replaced. In fact, one MD in an ER told me and my wife that the tubes tend to deteriorate from exposure to digestive fluids and seldom last more than six months or so. However, when I asked a GI specialist about this, he adamantly insisted that some tubes can and do last as long as five years. He assured me that doctors are not deliberately installing tubes that need to be replaced every few months.

Anyway I was able to train myself to regain the ability to chew and swallow enough soft food so that I do not need the feeding tube. I stopped using it a few months ago, and then about three weeks ago it fell out. I am not going to have it replaced. I still have a stoma in my abdomen that is healing slowly. There was some kind of infection near the site when the tube fell out and I am taking Keflex for it but will be through with the antibiotic in a day or two.

I had some scary but inconsequential pain in the first few days after the tube fell out. It was intrusive enough that I took a Tramadol just so I would not have to think about it, but after a day or two it went away. I've been told I might experience a few pin-prick pains in my abdomen at random times over the next couple months but need not worry about the minor discomfort.

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Stomach acid does deteriorate the tube. My husband had a feeding tube for 14 years and I changed his as needed. I was a nurse. Those bulbs on the end lost their ability to keep liquid and deflated. Easy to change out

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@norpel1313

Stomach acid does deteriorate the tube. My husband had a feeding tube for 14 years and I changed his as needed. I was a nurse. Those bulbs on the end lost their ability to keep liquid and deflated. Easy to change out

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Where did you get the feeding tubes? Were you given them or did you find a source to buy them? Why didn't you use the button type?

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