Exercise without and with following LCHF: Great Interview Rebecca

Running was an escape for Rebecca. But she knew that it wouldn't help her lose weight. So why can't you lose weight by exercising alone? Dr Boz explains more in this video with Connect member @rjwilliams

Great interview, Rebecca. I haven't had to adjust my workouts, but I was never running marathons like you do. Am I missing something? What top tips would you offer to fellow members about exercise and fasting, exercise and LCHF eating?

The biggest take-away for me is that exercise does NOT promote weight loss; however, weight loss does enhance exercise, and becoming keto-adaped (where your body uses fat for fuel) is the cream rising to the top. Your body can either use carbs or fat for fuel. Carbs are the easiest to burn, and if carbs are available, your body uses them and never taps into your fat stores. Carbs are like dry pine needles–they ignite and burn out quickly, and once it's gone, it's gone. Fat is a long slow burn, which equates to steady energy. It takes weeks to months to truly transition to being keto-adapted, but it's worth it!

If it's weight loss you're after, then that happens in the kitchen with what you eat. Eating LCHF increases satiety so you end up eating less and achieve even greater results with intermittent fasting.

My ultimate goal has always been to achieve a healthy and active lifestyle. Following a ketogenic diet along with intermittent fasting has helped me lose 30 pounds to-date, and I now have the energy to enjoy being active.

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This is great to see @rjwilliams! I really enjoyed it!

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@rjwilliams

The biggest take-away for me is that exercise does NOT promote weight loss; however, weight loss does enhance exercise, and becoming keto-adaped (where your body uses fat for fuel) is the cream rising to the top. Your body can either use carbs or fat for fuel. Carbs are the easiest to burn, and if carbs are available, your body uses them and never taps into your fat stores. Carbs are like dry pine needles–they ignite and burn out quickly, and once it's gone, it's gone. Fat is a long slow burn, which equates to steady energy. It takes weeks to months to truly transition to being keto-adapted, but it's worth it!

If it's weight loss you're after, then that happens in the kitchen with what you eat. Eating LCHF increases satiety so you end up eating less and achieve even greater results with intermittent fasting.

My ultimate goal has always been to achieve a healthy and active lifestyle. Following a ketogenic diet along with intermittent fasting has helped me lose 30 pounds to-date, and I now have the energy to enjoy being active.

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I've been doing a lot of research on food as medicine lately; and all of the experts I'm reading or listening to say the same thing. i.e. get healthy to lose weight, not lose weight to get healthy. This has changed the way I think, leading to my doing some extensive blood tests to see if I have leaky gut and identify possible allergies and food sensitivities to reduce inflammation, among other things. What do other people think about this concept?

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@nla4625

I've been doing a lot of research on food as medicine lately; and all of the experts I'm reading or listening to say the same thing. i.e. get healthy to lose weight, not lose weight to get healthy. This has changed the way I think, leading to my doing some extensive blood tests to see if I have leaky gut and identify possible allergies and food sensitivities to reduce inflammation, among other things. What do other people think about this concept?

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@nla4625, I agree. "Get healthy to lose weight" is one of the reasons that I've chosen to focus on improving my sleep. Better sleep promotes healthy weight (and weight loss). Also the things I do to improve my sleep additionally help maintain a healthy weight, i.e., outdoor exercise, no snacking, less computer screen = less sitting, etc. (Granted, I'm not doing well on less screen time. It's a work in progress.)

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@nla4625

I've been doing a lot of research on food as medicine lately; and all of the experts I'm reading or listening to say the same thing. i.e. get healthy to lose weight, not lose weight to get healthy. This has changed the way I think, leading to my doing some extensive blood tests to see if I have leaky gut and identify possible allergies and food sensitivities to reduce inflammation, among other things. What do other people think about this concept?

Jump to this post

@nla4625 – It certainly is a different way to look at the problem. When I was struggling to find answers for my idiopathic small fiber peripheral neuropathy I was overweight and around 260 to 280 pounds. I was more concerned then about finding something that could roll back or eliminate my numbness symptoms from the neuropathy. That was one of the reasons I found Connect. In my searches I found a book by Dr. Terry Wahls – The Wahls Protocol which was about how she used nutrition to roll back her symptoms of MS. I was interested in learning more about healthy foods and ones that provided cellular nutrition and also reduced inflammation. If nothing else the book changed my mind about the part food plays in my health.

I guess my thoughts on get healthy to lose weight vs. lose weight to get healthy are that it's not that simple for everyone. When I was "feeling good" at 330 lbs and age 50 I wanted to lose weight but didn't want to change my bad habits. But now at age 77, I'm thinking getting healthy will help me lose the weight and get to where I want to be 🙂

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