DESPERATELY FRIGHTENED PLEASE HELP ME

Posted by rubywitch67 @rubywitch67, Mon, Mar 18 3:44pm

I am a 67 year old woman with paroxysmal AFIB diagnosed in October of 2018. On Wednesday, 3/20, I am having an ablation. I had two cardiac stents placed about 10 years ago, so SOME of the procedure I'm familiar with, but this seems much more frightening to me. I like and trust both my cardiologist and the EP who will be doing the procedure, but there wasn't much time for them to answer all my questions. I am BEGGING anyone who has had an ablation to tell me what it's going to be like AFTER the procedure. I've read and heard SO many conflicting stories, I don't know what or who to believe and that is pushing my anxiety through the roof! Will it really be 3-6 months before I know if the ablation worked? Will I really still have episodes of AFIB for months afterwards? Will I have lots of chest pains, which I've read I will? How am I really going to feel? I know I will need to stay on the Xarelto, but will they put me on antiarrhythmics as well? I am just so scared about the "after" part of this procedure as nobody has really told me everything I can expect. I have panic disorder, which definitely does NOT help, but when I KNOW what to expect, I can control the panic. PLEASE…….if any of you can help me soon I would be ever so grateful. I have nobody to turn to but you folks. Thank you from the bottom of my wonky heart. Linda

Hi Linda, Please don't be afraid! I had an ablation about 9 years ago. I put it off for a couple years after my cardiologist suggested it, because I went on the Internet and read a bunch of stuff that scared me to death! I waited until my heart was out of rhythm ALL the time and I felt so lousy I figured I had nothing to lose. I didn't care to live feeling so crappy. So I had the ablation, stayed overnight in the hospital and went home the next day – and it put my heart in rhythm and I felt good almost from the beginning. The first month my heart still went out of rhythm from time to time, but I didn't feel bad. It took a little while to settle in. My doc said that was normal. My medications needed to be adjusted a few days later to less! About a month in the rhythm clicked in like Flynn I was quite overweight at the time, however, and about six months after I told my doctor I felt really good and was glad I had the ablation done but I still didn't have a lot of energy. He told me about Dr. Joel Fuhrman's book, EAT TO LIVE. I went on that way of eating immediately and within 10 months I'd lost 67 pounds and felt absolutely terrific!!! This lasted for 8 plus years. Recently, my AFIB came back. Fortunately, I do not feel bad even so. I havn't seen my ablation doc yet, however, I plan to, and if he says I should have another ablation, I would not hesitate! Not for a minute. Good luck and I hope to hear from you on this forum after your ablation! Please, Linda, do keep in touch with us.

REPLY
@afrobin

You are on blood thinners?!! Did you just start them? That seems rather extreme for the condition you describe as intermittent. But I know in the US (I am in Canada) people are very litigious and so doctors are forced to be ULTRA careful because even if there is a .001 % chance that you could have a stroke and the doctor didn't medicate with blood thinners, he could be sued from here to eternity. Here in Canada, you really can't sue for malpractice. It would cost you a fortune and you would get nothing much in return…if you even won.
Whenever my Afib was acting up, I was very well aware of it. My chest would roll and thud and race without letting up until I was put on beta blockers. It was very unpleasant. The Holter monitor (to check your heartbeat which you will probably be put on for 24 hours) malfunctioned because I didn't have 3 normal beats in a row.
If occasional blips and pounding and are interfering with your life…as in not being able to sleep (not even on your left side), and if bearing down as if you are giving birth doesn't stop the pounding, something needs to be done. Not ablation… but maybe a bit of medication. That's all. Don't worry. It does not sound serious or life threatening AT ALL.
And as I said, the cardiologist told me not to worry about pain that does not travel. It is muscular. You are tense after all.
You have such good blood pressure. It is perfect. I wish I had such low BP. Mediated, it is always around 145/90. Too high! I need to diet, lower salt intake and get moving more. Do you take medication to make it so low? I can see where the diastolic number (lower) can maybe make you feel a bit weak and possibly faint.
So, you feel weak and faint in general? Not just when the blips and thumping occur? Are you maybe just tired? Are you almost passing out when you feel faint?
If you saw my cardiologist, I am sure you would fall into the category of the 9 out of 10 that do not require medication for their mild arrhythmia, as he told me.

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I do not pass out when I feel faint. I just feel somewhat dizzy. But, I re-read the ER report, and they did a lung xray. It said my lungs are hyperinflated. I looked that up and it says that almost always means COP, which is now a catch-all term for chronic bronchitis (which I've suffered from on & off since I was a kid), or asthma, or lung damage from smoking or smoke inhalation. My dad was a smoker, hence my battles with bronchitis. I think sometimes that now I have asthma because sometimes (not all the time) it's hard to breathe, even before I wound up with afib. I had gone to the doctor about a year ago because I was having trouble catching a good breath, but she dismissed it as being from acid reflux. Now I'm wondering if I have COPD. I just talked to my sister-in-law who is a nurse, and she thinks maybe my afib is from my lung problems, not the other way around, because I've had trouble breathing since last summer. I got heavy smoke inhalation four years ago. So that makes sense, because I was thinking there is no way I drank enough to cause heart damage, I don't think so anyway. But, my dizziness is probably from not being able to breathe well.
So, I'm calling the doc tomorrow and making an appointment and will ask her if I can go see a pulmonary specialist as well as a cardiologist. I know there's nothing I can do about COPD, but I would really like to be able to feel better and to function better.
Thanks for helping me through this. It's been pretty hard on me.
To answer your question, I've always had low blood pressure. Before all this started it would get as low as 100/50, seriously. I do get faint sometimes from it, but I bought that monitor and have been checking all day, and before dinner my BP was 144/68. That alone should be a strong indicator that I do not have heart damage, but I don't know.
Well, tomorrow is another day. I hope you have a good rest of your week.

REPLY
@afrobin

You are on blood thinners?!! Did you just start them? That seems rather extreme for the condition you describe as intermittent. But I know in the US (I am in Canada) people are very litigious and so doctors are forced to be ULTRA careful because even if there is a .001 % chance that you could have a stroke and the doctor didn't medicate with blood thinners, he could be sued from here to eternity. Here in Canada, you really can't sue for malpractice. It would cost you a fortune and you would get nothing much in return…if you even won.
Whenever my Afib was acting up, I was very well aware of it. My chest would roll and thud and race without letting up until I was put on beta blockers. It was very unpleasant. The Holter monitor (to check your heartbeat which you will probably be put on for 24 hours) malfunctioned because I didn't have 3 normal beats in a row.
If occasional blips and pounding and are interfering with your life…as in not being able to sleep (not even on your left side), and if bearing down as if you are giving birth doesn't stop the pounding, something needs to be done. Not ablation… but maybe a bit of medication. That's all. Don't worry. It does not sound serious or life threatening AT ALL.
And as I said, the cardiologist told me not to worry about pain that does not travel. It is muscular. You are tense after all.
You have such good blood pressure. It is perfect. I wish I had such low BP. Mediated, it is always around 145/90. Too high! I need to diet, lower salt intake and get moving more. Do you take medication to make it so low? I can see where the diastolic number (lower) can maybe make you feel a bit weak and possibly faint.
So, you feel weak and faint in general? Not just when the blips and thumping occur? Are you maybe just tired? Are you almost passing out when you feel faint?
If you saw my cardiologist, I am sure you would fall into the category of the 9 out of 10 that do not require medication for their mild arrhythmia, as he told me.

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I just took my BP and it's 132/68 and my pulse is 71 with no afib right now.
If tonight I have trouble sleeping because it feels like my heart is pounding hard, I'll get up and take my BP again and see what my pulse is and whether the monitor says I'm having a afib episode. I have felt some flutters today, but the monitor hasn't indicated any afib when I've done the reading.

REPLY
@afrobin

You are on blood thinners?!! Did you just start them? That seems rather extreme for the condition you describe as intermittent. But I know in the US (I am in Canada) people are very litigious and so doctors are forced to be ULTRA careful because even if there is a .001 % chance that you could have a stroke and the doctor didn't medicate with blood thinners, he could be sued from here to eternity. Here in Canada, you really can't sue for malpractice. It would cost you a fortune and you would get nothing much in return…if you even won.
Whenever my Afib was acting up, I was very well aware of it. My chest would roll and thud and race without letting up until I was put on beta blockers. It was very unpleasant. The Holter monitor (to check your heartbeat which you will probably be put on for 24 hours) malfunctioned because I didn't have 3 normal beats in a row.
If occasional blips and pounding and are interfering with your life…as in not being able to sleep (not even on your left side), and if bearing down as if you are giving birth doesn't stop the pounding, something needs to be done. Not ablation… but maybe a bit of medication. That's all. Don't worry. It does not sound serious or life threatening AT ALL.
And as I said, the cardiologist told me not to worry about pain that does not travel. It is muscular. You are tense after all.
You have such good blood pressure. It is perfect. I wish I had such low BP. Mediated, it is always around 145/90. Too high! I need to diet, lower salt intake and get moving more. Do you take medication to make it so low? I can see where the diastolic number (lower) can maybe make you feel a bit weak and possibly faint.
So, you feel weak and faint in general? Not just when the blips and thumping occur? Are you maybe just tired? Are you almost passing out when you feel faint?
If you saw my cardiologist, I am sure you would fall into the category of the 9 out of 10 that do not require medication for their mild arrhythmia, as he told me.

Jump to this post

Hello catmom! Just got home from the hospital after my ablation yesterday. I have quite the story to tell you, but I have now been awake close to 40 hours and I can barely see to write this. I just wanted to let you know I haven't forgotten you or your questions and concerns. I see lots of folks are chiming in with some good advice that you should listen to. The decision for MY ablation was a real team effort that included my regular Cardiologist, the Electrophysiologists, which is quite a mouthful, so is commonly shortened to just “EP” or heart-rhythm specialist. I'm sorry if I'm sounding like a pre-med advisor now, but it IS important to know that a cardiologist and an EP differ in degrees of specialization. All EPs are cardiologists who have gone through an extra year or two of training after completing their cardiologist fellowship, and as stated before, all that extra training is only in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery.. So you definitely want one of these on your team as opposed to a general surgeon! And last, but not least, and this is just my opinion, but I found out yesterday how incredibly important THIS team member is. My EP also had me meet with the anesthesiologist he always chooses to work with. You are going about this the right way, which is to take it step by step seeing each doctor along that path before a decision is reached…..together. AFIB, if that is even what you have, is a very capricious "ailment." You need to be seen by the right people, led by the right people in the right order, to the right decision for you. I have to say that I am a little concerned that your GP has put you on blood thinners without you mentioning any testing beforehand. Anti-coagulants are serious medication, seldom given to people who have not been definitively diagnosed by specific testing protocols. If you ARE on blood thinners, which might only have been one day since you posted only 23 hours ago. I would urge you to call your doctor and discuss discontinuing them until you have seen and been tested by the cardiologist she is going to refer you to. Once you start thinners, if you DO have an arrhythmia, stopping them cold turkey increases your risk of stroke. Please talk to your doctor again, as soon as possible. See if she is can get you on a Holter or Event Monitor for 72 hours so when she refers you to the cardiologist, he will already have a good idea what is going on. I really have to call it a day…..well, closer to two, actually. If I don't sleep the entire day away tomorrow, I'll write you. Please take care of yourself. Linda

REPLY
@rubywitch67

Hello catmom! Just got home from the hospital after my ablation yesterday. I have quite the story to tell you, but I have now been awake close to 40 hours and I can barely see to write this. I just wanted to let you know I haven't forgotten you or your questions and concerns. I see lots of folks are chiming in with some good advice that you should listen to. The decision for MY ablation was a real team effort that included my regular Cardiologist, the Electrophysiologists, which is quite a mouthful, so is commonly shortened to just “EP” or heart-rhythm specialist. I'm sorry if I'm sounding like a pre-med advisor now, but it IS important to know that a cardiologist and an EP differ in degrees of specialization. All EPs are cardiologists who have gone through an extra year or two of training after completing their cardiologist fellowship, and as stated before, all that extra training is only in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery.. So you definitely want one of these on your team as opposed to a general surgeon! And last, but not least, and this is just my opinion, but I found out yesterday how incredibly important THIS team member is. My EP also had me meet with the anesthesiologist he always chooses to work with. You are going about this the right way, which is to take it step by step seeing each doctor along that path before a decision is reached…..together. AFIB, if that is even what you have, is a very capricious "ailment." You need to be seen by the right people, led by the right people in the right order, to the right decision for you. I have to say that I am a little concerned that your GP has put you on blood thinners without you mentioning any testing beforehand. Anti-coagulants are serious medication, seldom given to people who have not been definitively diagnosed by specific testing protocols. If you ARE on blood thinners, which might only have been one day since you posted only 23 hours ago. I would urge you to call your doctor and discuss discontinuing them until you have seen and been tested by the cardiologist she is going to refer you to. Once you start thinners, if you DO have an arrhythmia, stopping them cold turkey increases your risk of stroke. Please talk to your doctor again, as soon as possible. See if she is can get you on a Holter or Event Monitor for 72 hours so when she refers you to the cardiologist, he will already have a good idea what is going on. I really have to call it a day…..well, closer to two, actually. If I don't sleep the entire day away tomorrow, I'll write you. Please take care of yourself. Linda

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I'm too goofy to be on a computer……that is obvious! My reply was to catmom777, not @afrobin. But now I'm glad I goofed up as I did want to say to catmom777 that you made some excellent points and I hope she heeds your advice. It's good. Linda

REPLY
@rubywitch67

Hello catmom! Just got home from the hospital after my ablation yesterday. I have quite the story to tell you, but I have now been awake close to 40 hours and I can barely see to write this. I just wanted to let you know I haven't forgotten you or your questions and concerns. I see lots of folks are chiming in with some good advice that you should listen to. The decision for MY ablation was a real team effort that included my regular Cardiologist, the Electrophysiologists, which is quite a mouthful, so is commonly shortened to just “EP” or heart-rhythm specialist. I'm sorry if I'm sounding like a pre-med advisor now, but it IS important to know that a cardiologist and an EP differ in degrees of specialization. All EPs are cardiologists who have gone through an extra year or two of training after completing their cardiologist fellowship, and as stated before, all that extra training is only in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery.. So you definitely want one of these on your team as opposed to a general surgeon! And last, but not least, and this is just my opinion, but I found out yesterday how incredibly important THIS team member is. My EP also had me meet with the anesthesiologist he always chooses to work with. You are going about this the right way, which is to take it step by step seeing each doctor along that path before a decision is reached…..together. AFIB, if that is even what you have, is a very capricious "ailment." You need to be seen by the right people, led by the right people in the right order, to the right decision for you. I have to say that I am a little concerned that your GP has put you on blood thinners without you mentioning any testing beforehand. Anti-coagulants are serious medication, seldom given to people who have not been definitively diagnosed by specific testing protocols. If you ARE on blood thinners, which might only have been one day since you posted only 23 hours ago. I would urge you to call your doctor and discuss discontinuing them until you have seen and been tested by the cardiologist she is going to refer you to. Once you start thinners, if you DO have an arrhythmia, stopping them cold turkey increases your risk of stroke. Please talk to your doctor again, as soon as possible. See if she is can get you on a Holter or Event Monitor for 72 hours so when she refers you to the cardiologist, he will already have a good idea what is going on. I really have to call it a day…..well, closer to two, actually. If I don't sleep the entire day away tomorrow, I'll write you. Please take care of yourself. Linda

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Thanks very much for that advice. It was the ER doctor that prescribed Xarelto, which my body didn't like. I do feel trapped. I'm now on Eliquis and I feel almost the same as when I was on Xarelto, but not as bad. I'm very concerned about being on these blood thinners. I feel light-headed and sometimes dizzy and am not myself. A friend had some heart flutters and her doc told her to get magnesium supplements, which worked. She can still drink coffee and wine too. I feel like my world has been turned upside down but she is carrying on with her life life normal. My regular GP says she wants me to get this afib resolved. She knows I hate these drugs.
But, I have another problem that I didn't know about before the ER visit. I have hyperinflated lungs, which is basically COPD. I'm wondering now if my heart was beating so hard because it wasn't getting enough oxygen. I have an appointment with my doc next Wednesday and will ask her for a referral to a pulmonary specialist. One of the symptoms of COPD is heart palpitations. I want to get this addressed. COPD is incurable and progressive, but I need to deal with it. I have never been a cigarette smoker, but was raised in 2nd hand smoke and got serious smoke inhalation four years ago.
It's like a detective mission trying to figure all this out. I hope your ablation does the trick for you. This whole thing sucks. BTW, we only have a couple electrophysiologists here and one of them has a bad rep. so I may have no choice but to see a regular cardiologist. I've heard the one I'm seeing is good though.
Best of luck again with your ablation. Let me know how it goes please.

REPLY

Good morning, catmom,
Sorry to hear that you are feeling light-headed and dizzy and generally unwell. I checked the side effects of Eliquis and feeling light headed and dizzy are not among them so it must be your condition making you feel like that. Or other meds? Are you on any other medications for BP, diabetes or statins?
Maybe it is not specifically a heart issue after all. It could be all to do with your COPD…and after all, you had that incident 4 years ago where you inhaled carbon monoxide. There are treatments so don't despair. I have a friend (our age) who has had COPD for years. It is well managed and she goes out and about and enjoys life without any apparent limitations besides taking elevators instead of stairs.
I hope you are like me and research everything including meds you may be on and keep notes and ask for copies of all test results so that you are well informed and prepared to discuss your condition with the doctors.
And good that you check reviews on doctors. Is it on Rate your Doctor? Just like with restaurants and travel, one's health is far more important so checking out doctors is a good idea.
When you were at the hospital or the doctor's office, what was the result of the amount of oxygen in your blood? You know, they put a little clip on your finger to measure it. When I was at my last check up, the doctor said it should be 95% O2 saturation or higher. Mine was 98%. If yours is low, that could be why you feel light headed and dizzy.
Are you on other meds like to lower BP (which can make you feel weak, light headed and dizzy) or statins which it seems Big Pharma has every doctor convinced we should be on. My sister in law has borderline diabetes and was put on medication which is ridiculous. It made her so light headed because her blood sugar was way too low. How is your blood sugar? Do you have a friend with diabetes who can puncture your finger to see what your blood sugar is?
Yes, you have to be a detective! If you are on top of everything and are well informed about your condition, test results and side effects of medication etc…you will feel much more in control. The worst thing is feeling helpless and at the mercy of the health care system.
Remember, if you don't feel well, go to the hospital. If you say that it has something to do with the heart, they push you right through. That is the only way to be fast tracked to see a pulmonary specialist and get treatment for your COPD, if that is what is needed. Don't be a saint!

REPLY
@rubywitch67

Hello catmom! Just got home from the hospital after my ablation yesterday. I have quite the story to tell you, but I have now been awake close to 40 hours and I can barely see to write this. I just wanted to let you know I haven't forgotten you or your questions and concerns. I see lots of folks are chiming in with some good advice that you should listen to. The decision for MY ablation was a real team effort that included my regular Cardiologist, the Electrophysiologists, which is quite a mouthful, so is commonly shortened to just “EP” or heart-rhythm specialist. I'm sorry if I'm sounding like a pre-med advisor now, but it IS important to know that a cardiologist and an EP differ in degrees of specialization. All EPs are cardiologists who have gone through an extra year or two of training after completing their cardiologist fellowship, and as stated before, all that extra training is only in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery.. So you definitely want one of these on your team as opposed to a general surgeon! And last, but not least, and this is just my opinion, but I found out yesterday how incredibly important THIS team member is. My EP also had me meet with the anesthesiologist he always chooses to work with. You are going about this the right way, which is to take it step by step seeing each doctor along that path before a decision is reached…..together. AFIB, if that is even what you have, is a very capricious "ailment." You need to be seen by the right people, led by the right people in the right order, to the right decision for you. I have to say that I am a little concerned that your GP has put you on blood thinners without you mentioning any testing beforehand. Anti-coagulants are serious medication, seldom given to people who have not been definitively diagnosed by specific testing protocols. If you ARE on blood thinners, which might only have been one day since you posted only 23 hours ago. I would urge you to call your doctor and discuss discontinuing them until you have seen and been tested by the cardiologist she is going to refer you to. Once you start thinners, if you DO have an arrhythmia, stopping them cold turkey increases your risk of stroke. Please talk to your doctor again, as soon as possible. See if she is can get you on a Holter or Event Monitor for 72 hours so when she refers you to the cardiologist, he will already have a good idea what is going on. I really have to call it a day…..well, closer to two, actually. If I don't sleep the entire day away tomorrow, I'll write you. Please take care of yourself. Linda

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Hi Rubywitch, Good news that the ablation is behind you. You were so worried. You don't say how you feel besides being awake for 40 hours! Did it go smoothly? I presume it corrected the problem and that you are now on the mend. All the best! Robin

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Robin, my oxygen level has been consistently 97% to 100%. And, I do research the docs before I go ahead. I'm beginning to lose faith in my GP though. I told her over a year ago about my being short of breath and coughing, and she said it was due to acid reflux and put me on pantoprozole, which I didn't like and only took when I had to. I did have acid reflux (I drank coffee and wine then), but I feel she missed other symptoms. Now I'm coughing up stuff and got the xray in the ER that says my lungs are hyperinflated, which essentially means I have COPD. I'm calling around today to start looking for a pulmonary specialist.
It seems that when you have one health problem, you have more and some are connected. My body is going through a lot right now. Within a month I've been put on Xarelto (went off it), then Eliquis, and now just started alendronate sodium for osteoporosis. Hoping for no side effects.
I have found that my body tolerates Eliquis better if I drink lots of water. I seem to be very thirsty these days. I actually had a half-way good day yesterday and got a few things done, but then woke up at 12:30 am with a pounding heart. Got up and book my BP, which was 137/70 and pulse 73, but my heart was pounding very hard again and it was hard to sleep. I got maybe four hours sleep last night. My heart doesn't want me to sleep apparently. I'm supposed to pick up yet another drug to regulate my heartbeat. Just trying to keep it together until I see a cardiologist and start to get some answers.
All I can think about are my kids and grandkids. I have not yet seen the baby that was born last July. They live in another state. I want to see them and be able to drive and walk and enjoy the visit. I can't go visit them now because of my heart. If just doing yardwork and getting tired makes it beat hard and scare me, imagine playing with small children? I don't want to wind up in the ER there too.
Thanks for listening. I am so appreciative of all the feedback I'm getting on this. I am so scared. Being scared doesn't help with my heart, I know, but I can't help it.
Hope you have a good day.

REPLY
@afrobin

Hi Rubywitch, Good news that the ablation is behind you. You were so worried. You don't say how you feel besides being awake for 40 hours! Did it go smoothly? I presume it corrected the problem and that you are now on the mend. All the best! Robin

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Also, I am pre-diabetic. I have been careful though and it's stayed the same for years. I checked my blood sugar yesterday when I felt dizzy and it was actually kind of high for me at 123. I was shocked. I've never had a reading that high.

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@rubywitch67 First and foremost, you need to contact your doctor's office and you need to speak to him or her. You have every right in the world to have your questions answered by the doctor. Secondly, I wish you could find some excitement – not fear – that, due to the enormous advances in electrophysiology and ablation over the past decade, atrial fibrillation is curable in more cases than ever before. How wonderful! Also, the serious side effects of an ablations are extremely, extremely low. I had an ablation for another type of arrhythmia about 12 years ago. I was home a couple of hours after it, cooking dinner for my little boy. I had some skipped beats now and then but all calmed down quickly. There is no reason to think you will be worse instead of better. Try to be positive! They will keep you on the anticoagulant until you have been a-fib free for x amount of time (I don't know , of course, their specific protocol). Good luck! Try to frame the experience as an incredible opportunity to soon be, hopefully, atrial fibrillation free!! Of course, it doesn't work for every person but the odds are good!!

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Catmom., I may be mistaken, but I don't think a cardiologist has given you an official diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation. Don't be too eager to join the club! The fact that your GP got you an appointment with a cardiologist in 3 weeks indicates that she didn't find your condition too serious. If you had irregular beats and thumps every 10 – 20 seconds (or every 2 beats in my case years ago), and you were having trouble getting air, and you were feeling faint due to the irregular heart beats, your GP would have sent you directly to the ER where a doctor would have put you on beta blockers STAT! My advice is to take a deep breath…get out in the spring air, enjoy your grandchild, get your mind off occasional missed beats, eat well, get exercise so that you go to bed tired and so that you sleep well. At our age you expect to have something wrong. The body is deteriorating! Not fun! But please don't rush to take drugs.

A doctor I went to see who was obviously a puppet for Big Pharma as so many are, wanted me on statins because for the first time ever, my cholesterol level was .2 above the normal range. 'Normal' cholesterol levels used to be a lot higher than today's 'normal'. Big Pharma brought it down so that more people were put on statins. Then Big Pharma brought it down AGAIN to a new normal so that something like 90% of people over 55 are now on statins. Can we all be so sick?… There are well documented side effects of taking statins such as memory loss. And now they discover that cholesterol levels are not a good indicator of cardiac health. It's C-reactive protein and forget the cholesterol levels. I watched a documentary on Cholesterol, 'The Nature of Things' on YouTube and the bottom line was that only a man in his forties who had already had a cardiac arrest should be on statins.
I wouldn't doubt that you, Catmom and Rubywitch are both on statins. Nearly every American and probably Canadian over 55 is.
Check this out:
Google: 'Too Many Meds? America's Love Affair with Prescription Drugs' A quote from the article: "The amount of harm stemming from inappropriate prescription medication is staggering. Almost 1.3 million people went to U.S. emergency rooms due to adverse drug effects in 2014."… Patient beware!

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