CPAP machine for travel

Posted by beatricefay @beatricefay, Jun 20, 2018

Can anyone recommend a good CPAP machine for travel? The one I usually use is too large and heavy for my carry on.

@jakedduck1

@johnbishop
My cousin sets his bi-pap on a setting of 7. With this limited information, does anyone know what that setting does? I’m totally ignorant of these gadgets.
Thanks,
Jake

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@jakedduck1
I used a CPAP for around 15 years, and bought a loaner unit from the supply store for travel. I got tired of packing and unpacking my machine.

But a year or two ago my sleep doctor had me do a sleep study, and from what they saw they changed me to a BIPAP. CPAP means constant air pressure. The BIPAP only puts out pressure on my inhale. The setting I have is 12. I think that indicates the pressure.

AHI? I suppose that means the number of apneic events per hour. With the BIPAP, I almost always have numbers below 1.

I used a full face mask for years, and had ongoing issues with leaking. Not very nice for my wife. My machine is ResMed, and now I use nasal pillows. Of course, because I move around at night, my mask gets pushed out of place, but the air leakage is much quieter with the nasal pillows. I imagine that having a beard made it impossible to maintain a seal with the full face mask.

I've been a mouth breather all of my life until the ENT doctor corrected my deviated septum. I had never been able to breathe through my left nostril, and my right one wasn't the best, either. WOW! After surgery I could breathe through my nose! It was a great feeling.

Anyway, because I was a mouth breather for 50 years, my brain still is programed that way. So I wear a chin strap, which is semi effective. To prevent me from opening my mouth completely, I'd have to tighten the strap so tight that it would be painful.

As I age, I find that I must become more adaptable. I've heard about people being set in their ways, but that's not the way to live comfortably in an aging body.

So now I have only one machine, but since we moved 13 years ago, going to a doctor or Walmart or Costco is no longer a 3 hour drive (each way). We had to spend the night in a motel at least once a month, and it was nice to have a machine packed and ready to go.

It's about time to do what I've been writing about. I'm glad you guys are doing well with your sleep.

Jim

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@jakedduck1

@johnbishop
My cousin sets his bi-pap on a setting of 7. With this limited information, does anyone know what that setting does? I’m totally ignorant of these gadgets.
Thanks,
Jake

Jump to this post

@jakedduck1 — I'm pretty sure the setting of 7 is the air pressure setting prescribed by the doctor for the sleep apnea. My sleep medicine doctor prescribed a setting of 8 to 18 but it normally never gets above 12 during the night for me.

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@johnbishop

@jakedduck1 — I'm pretty sure the setting of 7 is the air pressure setting prescribed by the doctor for the sleep apnea. My sleep medicine doctor prescribed a setting of 8 to 18 but it normally never gets above 12 during the night for me.

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Thank you John
Jake

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@jimhd
Thanks Jim, glad your breathing better with your repaired nose. So is it common to lower the pressure setting when switching from cpap to bipap. My cousin used 7 with his ccap, should he decrease it now with the bipap. Sorry I’m so ignorant.
Jake

REPLY
@jimhd

@jakedduck1
I used a CPAP for around 15 years, and bought a loaner unit from the supply store for travel. I got tired of packing and unpacking my machine.

But a year or two ago my sleep doctor had me do a sleep study, and from what they saw they changed me to a BIPAP. CPAP means constant air pressure. The BIPAP only puts out pressure on my inhale. The setting I have is 12. I think that indicates the pressure.

AHI? I suppose that means the number of apneic events per hour. With the BIPAP, I almost always have numbers below 1.

I used a full face mask for years, and had ongoing issues with leaking. Not very nice for my wife. My machine is ResMed, and now I use nasal pillows. Of course, because I move around at night, my mask gets pushed out of place, but the air leakage is much quieter with the nasal pillows. I imagine that having a beard made it impossible to maintain a seal with the full face mask.

I've been a mouth breather all of my life until the ENT doctor corrected my deviated septum. I had never been able to breathe through my left nostril, and my right one wasn't the best, either. WOW! After surgery I could breathe through my nose! It was a great feeling.

Anyway, because I was a mouth breather for 50 years, my brain still is programed that way. So I wear a chin strap, which is semi effective. To prevent me from opening my mouth completely, I'd have to tighten the strap so tight that it would be painful.

As I age, I find that I must become more adaptable. I've heard about people being set in their ways, but that's not the way to live comfortably in an aging body.

So now I have only one machine, but since we moved 13 years ago, going to a doctor or Walmart or Costco is no longer a 3 hour drive (each way). We had to spend the night in a motel at least once a month, and it was nice to have a machine packed and ready to go.

It's about time to do what I've been writing about. I'm glad you guys are doing well with your sleep.

Jim

Jump to this post

Hi @jimhd, I also have a deviated septum and have issues with my right nostril always being plugged up and hard to breathe. My sleep doctor told me it wouldn't fix my obstructive sleep apnea but I'm thinking I might have it fixed anyway for the reason you mentioned about breathing being so much better. Psst…how old were you went you had the septoplasty? I'm 76 and wondering if I'll have any issues with the surgery.

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@jakedduck1

@jimhd
Thanks Jim, glad your breathing better with your repaired nose. So is it common to lower the pressure setting when switching from cpap to bipap. My cousin used 7 with his ccap, should he decrease it now with the bipap. Sorry I’m so ignorant.
Jake

Jump to this post

@jakedduck1 I don't know the details of the pressure. My doctor just set it up. It stayed at 12 when I made the switch.

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@johnbishop

Hi @jimhd, I also have a deviated septum and have issues with my right nostril always being plugged up and hard to breathe. My sleep doctor told me it wouldn't fix my obstructive sleep apnea but I'm thinking I might have it fixed anyway for the reason you mentioned about breathing being so much better. Psst…how old were you went you had the septoplasty? I'm 76 and wondering if I'll have any issues with the surgery.

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@johnbishop I had the surgery in April, '98. I was 47. It was a brief outpatient procedure. It was weird – I could feel the doctor using a hammer and chisel.

I slept on my left side and arranged my arms and hands so I put pressure on my right cheek, to open up my airway. Now I sleep on my right side.
Jim

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@jimhd

@jakedduck1 I don't know the details of the pressure. My doctor just set it up. It stayed at 12 when I made the switch.

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@jimhd
Thank you Jim.
Jake

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This is exactly what I need – recommendations for a good travel CPAP machine. Has anyone had experience with the Philips travel Dreamstation with humidifier? If so, what do you think of it? I am currently using a Philips System one 60 series and like it – but it's heavy and bulky.

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@muffy

This is exactly what I need – recommendations for a good travel CPAP machine. Has anyone had experience with the Philips travel Dreamstation with humidifier? If so, what do you think of it? I am currently using a Philips System one 60 series and like it – but it's heavy and bulky.

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I have the Dreamstation Go travel CPAP with the humidfier. I also have the Dreamstation CPAP which was my regular CPAP until I went on a long weekend trip and used my Dreamstation Go for the first time and had really good AHI numbers. When I got home I decided to make the travel CPAP my everyday machine and found that I'm getting better numbers with it that the Dreamstation. I like that they both sync up with the MyDreammapper program on my phone and computer so it's easy to keep track of the data. I used the humidifier but took it off this week and haven't missed using it yet.

I bought the larger travel case which comes with a cloth bag for the mask, headgear, tubing and power cord. The larger travel case will hold the CPAP and humidifier or the CPAP and battery but not much else. The small case will hold the CPAP itself and nothing else. All of the other stuff goes in the travel bag that comes with it. It does make it easy for traveling.

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@johnbishop

I have the Dreamstation Go travel CPAP with the humidfier. I also have the Dreamstation CPAP which was my regular CPAP until I went on a long weekend trip and used my Dreamstation Go for the first time and had really good AHI numbers. When I got home I decided to make the travel CPAP my everyday machine and found that I'm getting better numbers with it that the Dreamstation. I like that they both sync up with the MyDreammapper program on my phone and computer so it's easy to keep track of the data. I used the humidifier but took it off this week and haven't missed using it yet.

I bought the larger travel case which comes with a cloth bag for the mask, headgear, tubing and power cord. The larger travel case will hold the CPAP and humidifier or the CPAP and battery but not much else. The small case will hold the CPAP itself and nothing else. All of the other stuff goes in the travel bag that comes with it. It does make it easy for traveling.

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@johnbishop Do you know if they make a travel BIPAP? My ResMed is pretty compact and easy to pack and unpack. Where I live, in high desert, humidity is low enough that I need a humidifier, or my airway gets dry. Some of my meds are prone to causing dry mouth, so I use Bioteen mouthwash at bedtime, and I have a spray version of it on my nightstand, next to the Bioteen lozenges.

I'd better stop before this post turns into a novel.

Jim

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@jimhd

@johnbishop Do you know if they make a travel BIPAP? My ResMed is pretty compact and easy to pack and unpack. Where I live, in high desert, humidity is low enough that I need a humidifier, or my airway gets dry. Some of my meds are prone to causing dry mouth, so I use Bioteen mouthwash at bedtime, and I have a spray version of it on my nightstand, next to the Bioteen lozenges.

I'd better stop before this post turns into a novel.

Jim

Jump to this post

Hi @jimhd I think there are some newer more compact BIPAP machines that are easier to pack and take with you. I found some reviews that point to the ResMed AirCurve 10 VAuto w/ Humidifier as one of the smallest/best BIPAP machines. I get a little confused reading the reviews trying to determine if it's a BIPAP machine – the list says it is but reading the description on the manufacturers website seems to reference it as an Auto CPAP. I would have a discussion with the medical store before making a decision. Here's one of the review sites I found that may be helpful.
https://snoringabc.com/best-bipap-machines/

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