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steve1948
@steve1948

Posts: 28
Joined: Feb 20, 2017

Cpap and sleep

Posted by @steve1948, Feb 24, 2017

I was in the hospital for pneumonia and while I was getting a nebulizer treatment the therapist asked if I use a Cpap at home, at the time I didn’t have one. Now mind you I was only sleeping for 2 hrs a night during my pneumonia bout (2 weeks) and the therapist asked if I were open to using a BPAP (what they call it in a hospital) it was a large machine and I said of course. Upon using it I still only slept for 2 hours but it was a very restful 2 hours of sleep and was welcomed. I told my Pulmonologist and got set up for a sleep study, and it is all history. I sleep more restful (have much less visits to the bathroom at night) and use it religiously. Medicare covered my testing and machine. After my test my doc told me I stopped breathing x amount of times a minute, and was restless (tossed and turned) an ungodly amount of time during my test. On the follow up test (with the Cpap) the number decreased significantly. My sister snores like a constant thunder storm and she went for a test and got her Cpap, and now she doesn’t snore at all and tells me she sleeps much better.
There are two ways to use the machine, with a nostril mask (so to speak) and a full mask (you usually see on TV movies). The latter is what I use, I couldn’t get use to the nostril application, and if you were to catch a cold, I don’t know how well it would work, but I use the mask never the less. Hope this helps, and do read the instructions about your machine.

REPLY

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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@johnbishop Hi, John. I think the CPAP and BiPAP makers fail when they market the machines in a bag that is just big enough for the machine. If a person going to fly they often want the machine bag to be large enough to hold to hold whatever else they would take on the flight. Mine usually come in the small bag which i place under the seat in front of me, and operate the machine there. I would prefer a smaller machine I could take out of the bag which would go overhead then place it on my table to operate it. It could be round so I could wrap the tube around it.
Yes, it is scary, and my first couple months I took off the mask and threw it many times. Now after 31 years, I would not even think about going to sleep without it if I have a choice. It saves my life every time I put it on. My ECH tells that I have had many heart attack episodes, and I would bet most of them were from OSA.

@johnhans

I just saw a video on youtube about how to fit a resmed full face mask. It suggested tucking the hose under the top of the pillow to keep the hose from getting caught and pulling on the face mask. This of course means allowing an ample amount on the hose to allow you to turn before tucking the hose under the top of the pillow. Another suggesting was when adjusting the side straps be sure to adjust both sides at once. They allude to the fact that you do not need a perfect fit and that tightening too much can make things worse. They do show that the mask is tightened to the point of a little pressure on the face. Just loosely sitting on the face will not work. All of these are suggestions I have used except for the tucking of the hose. I will have to try that tonight.

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@johnhans I have mounted a small three foot mast next to my bed, attached to the nightstand where I keep my BiPAP. I run the tube to a loop on top, then down to me. This way the excess water just condenses in the colder tube and runs back down to the reservoir, and nothing pulls on the tube. I used to sleep on my front or side but this is much better.

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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Hello @oldkarl

You certainly are a testimony to the value of the CPAP. I am glad that you adjusted to this way of sleeping. After 31 years, your experience speaks volumes to those who are just beginners!
Teresa

I have been wearing a CPAP for about 15-16 years; I really don't remember when I got it. I sleep on both sides and my back, kinda like a wave just rolling all night. Drives my best half crazy, but it is much better than tossing accompanied by a freight train roar. I have a terrible time with dry mouth and tried to go back to a full mask from my nose pillow, but it did not help and I could not find a material that did not cause my face to sweat and then develop a rash, so back to nose pillow. I also have not been able to take full advantage of mine as higher pressures cause me to swallow air and I wake up with much bigger problems than missing a few breaths. I am unable to sleep in a lab and am being set up for a self-titrating machine to give my doc the data they need. I do take mine everywhere I go. If I nap in my recliner, I move my machine to the den. Before my first test, a friend of a friend died in his sleep while waiting to for a study, so I never sleep without mine. Forgot to take my power cord to the outer banks one year and had to drive back to the mainland and go to several computer stores until I found someone with a huge box full of spare power supply cords and one fit my machine perfectly. Sorry for my verbosity.

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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Hi @oldkarl — I haven't been on a long vacation for a long time. I would probably figure out a way to take part of my setup with me if I ever go on a long trip again. On the bright side, I haven't thrown my mask down yet. ☺

@gman007

I have been wearing a CPAP for about 15-16 years; I really don't remember when I got it. I sleep on both sides and my back, kinda like a wave just rolling all night. Drives my best half crazy, but it is much better than tossing accompanied by a freight train roar. I have a terrible time with dry mouth and tried to go back to a full mask from my nose pillow, but it did not help and I could not find a material that did not cause my face to sweat and then develop a rash, so back to nose pillow. I also have not been able to take full advantage of mine as higher pressures cause me to swallow air and I wake up with much bigger problems than missing a few breaths. I am unable to sleep in a lab and am being set up for a self-titrating machine to give my doc the data they need. I do take mine everywhere I go. If I nap in my recliner, I move my machine to the den. Before my first test, a friend of a friend died in his sleep while waiting to for a study, so I never sleep without mine. Forgot to take my power cord to the outer banks one year and had to drive back to the mainland and go to several computer stores until I found someone with a huge box full of spare power supply cords and one fit my machine perfectly. Sorry for my verbosity.

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Hi Gary @gman007, I can relate to the wave and rolling back and forth all night. I do the same thing. I also have a problem with my mouth getting really dry. Biotene Dry Mouth oral rinse really helps me. I use it just before bedtime.

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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@johnbishop; @oldkarl– I have several friends & relatives that have told me several times that they have ripped their masks off and flung them accross the room! Thankfully the C-pap remained! 🙂 !

I am also a mouth-breather who uses a full-face mask. On occasion, I have gotten up in the morning to discover that I have destroyed part of the cushion by chewing on it!

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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I have been reading everyone's reactions to the equipment and at times I have to chuckle. Maybe the manufacturer should add a warning label, "Irritability Can Occur Before Adjustment Begins."
Teresa

@bernese53

I am also a mouth-breather who uses a full-face mask. On occasion, I have gotten up in the morning to discover that I have destroyed part of the cushion by chewing on it!

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@bernese53– Wow, haven't heard that happening before! Maybe they should start making mint flavored cushions. Hah ha! Thanks for sharing that Bernese. Jim @thankful

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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@hopeful33250– Teresa, I totally agree with a warning label! Lets start working on a acronym for that! That would be great! ICOBAB needs works but so true.

@gman007

I have been wearing a CPAP for about 15-16 years; I really don't remember when I got it. I sleep on both sides and my back, kinda like a wave just rolling all night. Drives my best half crazy, but it is much better than tossing accompanied by a freight train roar. I have a terrible time with dry mouth and tried to go back to a full mask from my nose pillow, but it did not help and I could not find a material that did not cause my face to sweat and then develop a rash, so back to nose pillow. I also have not been able to take full advantage of mine as higher pressures cause me to swallow air and I wake up with much bigger problems than missing a few breaths. I am unable to sleep in a lab and am being set up for a self-titrating machine to give my doc the data they need. I do take mine everywhere I go. If I nap in my recliner, I move my machine to the den. Before my first test, a friend of a friend died in his sleep while waiting to for a study, so I never sleep without mine. Forgot to take my power cord to the outer banks one year and had to drive back to the mainland and go to several computer stores until I found someone with a huge box full of spare power supply cords and one fit my machine perfectly. Sorry for my verbosity.

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My dentist suggested Biotene. I have the mouthwash, toothpaste, a spray, paste for the tongue, and lozenges – does nothing for me. I think between diabetes and narcotics, I am always gonna be dried out. I track my fluid intake and I am usually at 16-17 cups/day and all that does is keep me exercised shuffling to the bathroom and back.

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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Well, I focused on sleeping only on my side last night and I used your pillow suggestion of sleeping with the face on the side of the pillow. I had to switch to a smaller pillow but I did sleep much better and was happy to see the results with an AHI of 4.9. The true test will be the next few days to see if it stays around the same or gets better. Thanks for the tips @johnhans and the support from all of my CPAP pals.

Capture

@gman007

I have been wearing a CPAP for about 15-16 years; I really don't remember when I got it. I sleep on both sides and my back, kinda like a wave just rolling all night. Drives my best half crazy, but it is much better than tossing accompanied by a freight train roar. I have a terrible time with dry mouth and tried to go back to a full mask from my nose pillow, but it did not help and I could not find a material that did not cause my face to sweat and then develop a rash, so back to nose pillow. I also have not been able to take full advantage of mine as higher pressures cause me to swallow air and I wake up with much bigger problems than missing a few breaths. I am unable to sleep in a lab and am being set up for a self-titrating machine to give my doc the data they need. I do take mine everywhere I go. If I nap in my recliner, I move my machine to the den. Before my first test, a friend of a friend died in his sleep while waiting to for a study, so I never sleep without mine. Forgot to take my power cord to the outer banks one year and had to drive back to the mainland and go to several computer stores until I found someone with a huge box full of spare power supply cords and one fit my machine perfectly. Sorry for my verbosity.

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Gary @gman007, I can relate to the bathroom shuffling at night even though I struggle to drink enough water during the day.

@johnhans

I think it is important to note that sleep apnea patients who sleep on their side need to have their face half off of the pillow. Otherwise the pillow will move a full face mask over and cause it to leak. There are also special pillows that are available to buy for those who want something just for sleep apnea patients, but I have always used the sleep halfway off technique. I do not know how many of us sleep on their side, but it was recommended to me when I first started on CPAP therapy years ago. I was told that it lessens the incidence of sleep apnea. When I did my sleep study I was told to sleep on my back so as not to disturb the electrode placements. Before the study, I always slept on my back.

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@thankful Great idea – you just have love to acronyms!

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