cellulitis

Posted by JJaye @jjaye, Nov 15, 2011

Prevention of cellulitis-anybody have ideas? I can’t go off of certain meds that may be making the right internal environment for cellulitis. I was thinking of shin guards-ones that go on above slacks and ones that hide beneath that I can wear on my job. These would have to go around like lacrosse shin guards do. I wonder if any of yuo have made some of these to protect lower legs from bumps. All I have to do is bump my loser leg and get cellulitis. thanks!!

JJaye here-I meant lower leg not loser leg.

REPLY

If you are talking about that lumpy fat beneath the skin, the only thing I know that gets rid of it is losing weight and exercising. You can do both of these things while taking certain medication. Just make sure to get the okay from your doctor before you start a rigorous workout routine. I got a heart stress test over a year ago before I went back to the gym and what cellulite I had is just about gone now. It doesn’t disappear overnight but you can make it go away as you build muscle and burn fat.

REPLY

Cellulitis is an infection of the deepest layers of the skin that presents as inflamed,hot,swollen skin that if left untreated can eventually lead to death. Yep, that’s cellulitis.

REPLY

I see there has been no activity on this for 6 months but I will add my two cents anyway. You really should discuss this with your doc, each case is different. My cellulitis went septic (yeah the kind that can lead to death) so I have been very inspired to try to educate myself to prevent reoccurance, thankfully I do not have diabetes or an immune deficeiency which complicates things.
When I was in the hospital I started asking immediately about prevention but I did not get much response (they seemed to be preoccupied with keeping me alive) so I had to push. Eventually I got the most help from my dermatologist. I had swollen ankles so I now wear compression socks whenever I am awake, but you have to be very careful putting them on as you can cause an abrasion if you pinch yourself (keep your fingernails clipped close). This has reduced fluid build up in my lower leg dramatically which was a very good environment for infection. I also use a prescribed anti fungal cream daily between the toes(and for the rest of my life) to prevent athletes foot ( a common source of cellulitis infection). He also prescribed an ointment for a very occasional case of dyslaidrosis ecsema which if it shows up i get under control as quickly as possible. I use an prescribed antibiotic cream if I do get any kind of abrasion or scratch (I check for them daily). If I do have an sore which keeps me from wearing the socks I bandage the sore and then wrap my leg with horse wrap (available from your local farm store for a buck and a half).
After my bout with cellulitis my skin was thin fragile and discolored, so my dermatologist had me use amlactin cream daily (over the counter) to try to toughen it up, it seems to be slowly but progressively doing that. The amlactin will also remove dead skin and prevent dry cracked skin on both leg and feet which is also a source of infection.My hard dry feet are now as as smooth as a babies butt.
My infectious disease specialist has me on long term penicillin threapy (500 mg twice a day). There is some controversy over this approach, depends on who you talk to, but he seems to be comfortable with it.
To date this combination has been very sucessfull. Thankfully I also had a full recovery from the sepsis. Other than the compression socks and horse wrap and amlactin all these treatments are prescribed so as I said you need to work with your doc, I have three, a general practioner, dermatologist, and infectious disease specialist.
Hope this helps

Liked by konniehoover

REPLY
@pmack

I see there has been no activity on this for 6 months but I will add my two cents anyway. You really should discuss this with your doc, each case is different. My cellulitis went septic (yeah the kind that can lead to death) so I have been very inspired to try to educate myself to prevent reoccurance, thankfully I do not have diabetes or an immune deficeiency which complicates things.
When I was in the hospital I started asking immediately about prevention but I did not get much response (they seemed to be preoccupied with keeping me alive) so I had to push. Eventually I got the most help from my dermatologist. I had swollen ankles so I now wear compression socks whenever I am awake, but you have to be very careful putting them on as you can cause an abrasion if you pinch yourself (keep your fingernails clipped close). This has reduced fluid build up in my lower leg dramatically which was a very good environment for infection. I also use a prescribed anti fungal cream daily between the toes(and for the rest of my life) to prevent athletes foot ( a common source of cellulitis infection). He also prescribed an ointment for a very occasional case of dyslaidrosis ecsema which if it shows up i get under control as quickly as possible. I use an prescribed antibiotic cream if I do get any kind of abrasion or scratch (I check for them daily). If I do have an sore which keeps me from wearing the socks I bandage the sore and then wrap my leg with horse wrap (available from your local farm store for a buck and a half).
After my bout with cellulitis my skin was thin fragile and discolored, so my dermatologist had me use amlactin cream daily (over the counter) to try to toughen it up, it seems to be slowly but progressively doing that. The amlactin will also remove dead skin and prevent dry cracked skin on both leg and feet which is also a source of infection.My hard dry feet are now as as smooth as a babies butt.
My infectious disease specialist has me on long term penicillin threapy (500 mg twice a day). There is some controversy over this approach, depends on who you talk to, but he seems to be comfortable with it.
To date this combination has been very sucessfull. Thankfully I also had a full recovery from the sepsis. Other than the compression socks and horse wrap and amlactin all these treatments are prescribed so as I said you need to work with your doc, I have three, a general practioner, dermatologist, and infectious disease specialist.
Hope this helps

Jump to this post

Thanks so much for replying, Pmack! What does the horsewrap do? How do you wear it? thanks!

REPLY
@pmack

I see there has been no activity on this for 6 months but I will add my two cents anyway. You really should discuss this with your doc, each case is different. My cellulitis went septic (yeah the kind that can lead to death) so I have been very inspired to try to educate myself to prevent reoccurance, thankfully I do not have diabetes or an immune deficeiency which complicates things.
When I was in the hospital I started asking immediately about prevention but I did not get much response (they seemed to be preoccupied with keeping me alive) so I had to push. Eventually I got the most help from my dermatologist. I had swollen ankles so I now wear compression socks whenever I am awake, but you have to be very careful putting them on as you can cause an abrasion if you pinch yourself (keep your fingernails clipped close). This has reduced fluid build up in my lower leg dramatically which was a very good environment for infection. I also use a prescribed anti fungal cream daily between the toes(and for the rest of my life) to prevent athletes foot ( a common source of cellulitis infection). He also prescribed an ointment for a very occasional case of dyslaidrosis ecsema which if it shows up i get under control as quickly as possible. I use an prescribed antibiotic cream if I do get any kind of abrasion or scratch (I check for them daily). If I do have an sore which keeps me from wearing the socks I bandage the sore and then wrap my leg with horse wrap (available from your local farm store for a buck and a half).
After my bout with cellulitis my skin was thin fragile and discolored, so my dermatologist had me use amlactin cream daily (over the counter) to try to toughen it up, it seems to be slowly but progressively doing that. The amlactin will also remove dead skin and prevent dry cracked skin on both leg and feet which is also a source of infection.My hard dry feet are now as as smooth as a babies butt.
My infectious disease specialist has me on long term penicillin threapy (500 mg twice a day). There is some controversy over this approach, depends on who you talk to, but he seems to be comfortable with it.
To date this combination has been very sucessfull. Thankfully I also had a full recovery from the sepsis. Other than the compression socks and horse wrap and amlactin all these treatments are prescribed so as I said you need to work with your doc, I have three, a general practioner, dermatologist, and infectious disease specialist.
Hope this helps

Jump to this post

For cellulitis prevention it is essential to me to keep the fluid build up on my ankles down so thus I wear compression socks however if I do get a sore that requires antibiotic cream and a gauze bandage it is impossible to get the socks on and keep the bandage in place so instead I use the wrap to keep the gauze in place and provide the compresion for my ankle. My GP’s nurse turned me on to this. It takes the place of the old ace bandage. She used the “human” version in the office which runs upwards of $10 a roll at the drug store, but told me about the vet use only version which is about $1.50 in the ag store. The wrap is flexible and adheres to itself. I can mimic the compresion the socks give, I start low on the ankle, a little tighter there and just a bit looser around the calf. You don’t need any clips and it stays in place all day. It also affords some protection from the bumps you mentioned . Do be carefull however not to get it to tight and restrict blood flow. You can get a couple uses out of each roll. It does have latex so if your allerigic don’t use it. Here’s a link to our local ag store it’s actually called a cohesive flexible bandage. http://www.farmandfleet.com/farm_livestock/horse_tack/horse/wound_care/?p=2

I do know by the way exactly what your talking about with the bumps. When i first got out of the hospital it took hardly any bump at all to cause an abrasion, My skin wasn’t tissue paper thin but wasn’t far from it. Lucklly with the antibiotic ointment none of them turned into cellulitis. I did try shin guards, for me they were more trouble than they were worth, they rubbed on the skin and caused a sore.

from one who’s been there, good luck

REPLY

Take a low dose aspirin regimen if you are able. You will have to take some bactrum and use the bacitracin ointment if you want.

REPLY
@ginacostello

Take a low dose aspirin regimen if you are able. You will have to take some bactrum and use the bacitracin ointment if you want.

Jump to this post

I can’t take a low dose asprin and I’m allergic to bactrim ( by Rx only) and I don’t have any sores, but if you have any other suggestions I’d appreciate it. thanks! JJaye

REPLY
@ginacostello

Take a low dose aspirin regimen if you are able. You will have to take some bactrum and use the bacitracin ointment if you want.

Jump to this post

In sorry, I figured you might have some reasons to not do this. I have chronic granulomatous disease and am prone to cellulitus/impentego. It causes me to be allergic to seafood, metal, and latex. I have dry shaved two times in two years, and once dealt with cellulitus into impentego for a long time. This year I only delt with the cellulitus part. The low dose aspirin keeps the blood from clotting, which is where the danger of death the other posting person mentioned comes from. the bactrim is the drug that gets into the problem. What do they give you instead of bactrim for the same type of bacteria. That is what you need to find out. In the hospital there is a formulary drug use supply of medicine. You must find out what could possibly be replace and find the faciliy who is willing to administer it. Some facilities go by cost effectiveness, but do purchace other items.
Gina Costello

REPLY

i have the same problem bump or lean into anything and it appears.blood cultures and wound cultures all come back negative.any one else have the same problem?

REPLY

I have a question about cellulitis. I had cellulitis for 6 months in 2013. I now have a have a condition in both legs and ankles. There is fluid beneath the skin in multiple areas. This fluid is not affected by fluid pills. No local MD’s have a clue. Any suggestions?

Liked by janinehomewood

REPLY

Hello @johnayz, and welcome to Connect.

As you will see, I have merged your message with a past discussion, with the hope that a few of our members who have similar symptoms will join the conversation.
Here is some information form Mayo Clinic about the complications and risk factors associated with cellulitis: http://mayocl.in/1JmMlf5

Allow me to also introduce you to @charlena, @pmack, @chgorich, @jennene, @delores, @jilly, @janflan, @jjaye, @ginacostello, @bmasten; I hope they can give you some more insight.

@johnayz, how are you managing your symptoms?

Liked by janinehomewood

REPLY

I have a similar problem with it….I just keep getting it over again. I don’t even have to get bumped, I just keep getting it. I’ d love to know Why !!!

REPLY
@pmack

I see there has been no activity on this for 6 months but I will add my two cents anyway. You really should discuss this with your doc, each case is different. My cellulitis went septic (yeah the kind that can lead to death) so I have been very inspired to try to educate myself to prevent reoccurance, thankfully I do not have diabetes or an immune deficeiency which complicates things.
When I was in the hospital I started asking immediately about prevention but I did not get much response (they seemed to be preoccupied with keeping me alive) so I had to push. Eventually I got the most help from my dermatologist. I had swollen ankles so I now wear compression socks whenever I am awake, but you have to be very careful putting them on as you can cause an abrasion if you pinch yourself (keep your fingernails clipped close). This has reduced fluid build up in my lower leg dramatically which was a very good environment for infection. I also use a prescribed anti fungal cream daily between the toes(and for the rest of my life) to prevent athletes foot ( a common source of cellulitis infection). He also prescribed an ointment for a very occasional case of dyslaidrosis ecsema which if it shows up i get under control as quickly as possible. I use an prescribed antibiotic cream if I do get any kind of abrasion or scratch (I check for them daily). If I do have an sore which keeps me from wearing the socks I bandage the sore and then wrap my leg with horse wrap (available from your local farm store for a buck and a half).
After my bout with cellulitis my skin was thin fragile and discolored, so my dermatologist had me use amlactin cream daily (over the counter) to try to toughen it up, it seems to be slowly but progressively doing that. The amlactin will also remove dead skin and prevent dry cracked skin on both leg and feet which is also a source of infection.My hard dry feet are now as as smooth as a babies butt.
My infectious disease specialist has me on long term penicillin threapy (500 mg twice a day). There is some controversy over this approach, depends on who you talk to, but he seems to be comfortable with it.
To date this combination has been very sucessfull. Thankfully I also had a full recovery from the sepsis. Other than the compression socks and horse wrap and amlactin all these treatments are prescribed so as I said you need to work with your doc, I have three, a general practioner, dermatologist, and infectious disease specialist.
Hope this helps

Jump to this post

Thank U, More Ideas to combat this problem….

REPLY
@jjaye

JJaye here-I meant lower leg not loser leg.

Jump to this post

keep your legs well hydrated i use bag balm you can get it at any feed store.

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.