Having auras and memory issues, yet test results confusing

Posted by Nadn @nadinen, Mon, May 27 12:59pm

I didnt understand my doctor well.. this is the first time something was found with eeg.. i had two before when i was younger..never found anything until now.. also had mri never found anything

I was told to do a new mri
Doctor said dont bother because even if there was something i wont go through with a surgery since epilepsy is considered well controlled

20190511_165215

Liked by Leonard

@nadinen
Hello,
I don’t understand what your question is.
You mentioned having two previous EEG’s that were normal but your last one was abnormal. Since you didn’t experience a seizure during the first two EEG’s the tests were normal. Normal tests are very common in Epilepsy patients. During your last EEG you had some seizure activity even though you may not have shown any seizure symptoms.
It appears you have TLE (Temporal Lobe Epilepsy) with Focal Aware Seizures (formerly known as Simple Partial Seizures) which appear to be controlled. As far as the new MRI is concerned it’s always a relief to know there are no structural problems other than the expected age related changes. But if your seizures are controlled there is no reason for surgery or electronic devices. Unless your having new symptoms or more frequent seizures another MRI seems pointless other than for piece of mind.
Wishing you health and happiness,
Jake

REPLY

@nadinen, Test results can be a challenge to understand. EEG findings should be discussed with your doctor who can interpret the results with the context of your overall clinical history. I strongly encourage you to talk to your doctor and ask questions until you get a picture of what it going on.

Like @jakedduck1, I'm a bit confused. Are you saying that one doctor order the EEG and another doctor said not to bother? Are you having new symptoms?

Liked by Leonard

REPLY

Sorry i should have been more clear

Yes i got told by my doctor not to bother with another mri

I guess i am just confused by the results how it says the left side is slowing.. my memory has become horrible and i am on double dose of my tegratol now due to having more auras..

Slowing as in my brain functions slowly or?

Liked by Leonard

REPLY
@jakedduck1

@nadinen
Hello,
I don’t understand what your question is.
You mentioned having two previous EEG’s that were normal but your last one was abnormal. Since you didn’t experience a seizure during the first two EEG’s the tests were normal. Normal tests are very common in Epilepsy patients. During your last EEG you had some seizure activity even though you may not have shown any seizure symptoms.
It appears you have TLE (Temporal Lobe Epilepsy) with Focal Aware Seizures (formerly known as Simple Partial Seizures) which appear to be controlled. As far as the new MRI is concerned it’s always a relief to know there are no structural problems other than the expected age related changes. But if your seizures are controlled there is no reason for surgery or electronic devices. Unless your having new symptoms or more frequent seizures another MRI seems pointless other than for piece of mind.
Wishing you health and happiness,
Jake

Jump to this post

What do you mean expected age related changes..?

Liked by Leonard

REPLY

Someone advised me to get a thin cut mri to see the left side more clearly incase there is something..and get surgery if possible instead of taking medication for life.. what are your opinions..i feel if im well controlled im ok but i hate medication too ..

Liked by Leonard

REPLY
@nadinen

What do you mean expected age related changes..?

Jump to this post

@nadinen
Hi,
Our brains change significantly over time just like the rest of the body. When young, for a few years the brain makes new connections at the rate of one million per second. Not sure how scientists came to that conclusion. Our brain isn’t fully developed until between age 25-35 more or less. Our speech and language don’t usually change but memory usually does. Seizures (probably not all seizures) and Epilepsy medication usually add to memory problems. Around age 60-70 the brain actually begins to shrink and probably shrinks the most between 70-80. One place this happens fastest is in the frontal lobe which may be why it’s more difficult to learn and make and retain memories as we age.
Jake

Liked by Julia

REPLY
@jakedduck1

@nadinen
Hi,
Our brains change significantly over time just like the rest of the body. When young, for a few years the brain makes new connections at the rate of one million per second. Not sure how scientists came to that conclusion. Our brain isn’t fully developed until between age 25-35 more or less. Our speech and language don’t usually change but memory usually does. Seizures (probably not all seizures) and Epilepsy medication usually add to memory problems. Around age 60-70 the brain actually begins to shrink and probably shrinks the most between 70-80. One place this happens fastest is in the frontal lobe which may be why it’s more difficult to learn and make and retain memories as we age.
Jake

Jump to this post

That is true. I agree with you

Liked by Leonard

REPLY
@jakedduck1

@nadinen
Hi,
Our brains change significantly over time just like the rest of the body. When young, for a few years the brain makes new connections at the rate of one million per second. Not sure how scientists came to that conclusion. Our brain isn’t fully developed until between age 25-35 more or less. Our speech and language don’t usually change but memory usually does. Seizures (probably not all seizures) and Epilepsy medication usually add to memory problems. Around age 60-70 the brain actually begins to shrink and probably shrinks the most between 70-80. One place this happens fastest is in the frontal lobe which may be why it’s more difficult to learn and make and retain memories as we age.
Jake

Jump to this post

My epilepsy.seemed to.begin at.age 71 about two months after back surgery. It seems to be under control with Lamotrine.
My heart goes out to those of you with frequent seizures.
Bruce G

Liked by Leonard

REPLY
@bruceg

My epilepsy.seemed to.begin at.age 71 about two months after back surgery. It seems to be under control with Lamotrine.
My heart goes out to those of you with frequent seizures.
Bruce G

Jump to this post

@bruceg
Hi Bruce,
People under 20 and over 65 most frequently develop Epilepsy.
Did you ask your Neurologist if your surgery could in any way be responsible for developing Epilepsy?
Is the lamotrigine controlling your seizures?
Health and happiness,
Jake

REPLY
@jakedduck1

@bruceg
Hi Bruce,
People under 20 and over 65 most frequently develop Epilepsy.
Did you ask your Neurologist if your surgery could in any way be responsible for developing Epilepsy?
Is the lamotrigine controlling your seizures?
Health and happiness,
Jake

Jump to this post

The Lamotrigine seems to be helping.
My memory is the worst effect of my.seizures. It.seems as of about half of my life is missing.
I do not remember if I asked my neurologist about the back operation.
It is on my list for my next appointment.

Liked by Leonard

REPLY

Does.anyone have any suggestions on dealing with long term memory loss?

Liked by Leonard

REPLY
@bruceg

The Lamotrigine seems to be helping.
My memory is the worst effect of my.seizures. It.seems as of about half of my life is missing.
I do not remember if I asked my neurologist about the back operation.
It is on my list for my next appointment.

Jump to this post

@bruceg
There is no doubt Seizures and Anticonvulsants definitely take their toll on our memories. Most seizure meds are sodium channel blockers like your med Lamotrigine which are better than the Calcium Channel Blockers which are now understood to cause memory and some brain damage. Anything that affects your cognitive abilities, learning, thinking, perception, visual processing, problem-solving and concentration have a direct affect on memory.
There are so many things that affect memory including our age, nutrition, emotional health and sleep among many other things.
As far as what can be done about helping improve or get memories back I’m not sure.
When I was in rehab last fall I had speech therapy which helped improve my memory, short term, to some degree. Not sure what can be done for long term. Decades of my memory are are gone forever due to Status Seizures causing Retrograde Amnesia. My past might be best forgotten anyway. Doing things that stimulate the brain like crossword puzzles, exercise, social interaction, good sleep habit, good nutrition, reduce stress, laughter, avoid anxiety, depression and stimulating activities certainly can’t hurt.
Jake

REPLY
@nadinen

Someone advised me to get a thin cut mri to see the left side more clearly incase there is something..and get surgery if possible instead of taking medication for life.. what are your opinions..i feel if im well controlled im ok but i hate medication too ..

Jump to this post

Hi, @nadinen – wondering how you are doing and if you and your doctor decided to pursue the thin-cut MRI to see the left side more clearly or possibly proceed with surgery?

REPLY

Hi, at the moment i am taking extra tegratol, and i am going to see if that helps, if that doesnt help my simple partials, my doctor is convinced the sensations i am feeling may be due to anxiety and will put me on an anxiety medication

I hope it doesnt get to that point,but anything for these auras and partials to go away.

Liked by Lisa Lucier, Leonard

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.