Neuropathy and Brain Neuroplasticity

Posted by Barry Sheales @user_che214927, Feb 15, 2020

I have been diagnosed as having Peripheral-neuropathy. I am aged 89 and extremely fit. Iam on nil medication for any reason, and am not in pain.. I have studied the new science of Neuroplasticity, and have started following the practices I need to adopt and actuall regrow my neurons to a full recovery. Are there any brain exercises out there that I can review?

@johnbishop

Hi Barry @user_che214927, That is such a great topic! I had once started reading a book "The Brain's Way of Healing" by Norman Doidge — http://www.normandoidge.com/ and found it very interesting. To be honest I got about half way through the book and gave it to a friend. From what I read it makes a ton of sense but I was in the wrong frame of mind to give it a try. It kind of reminds me of a saying that's been around a long time – "The Power of Positive Thinking". I actually think there is diet craze going on now that is using the technique.

What brain exercises have you found that worked for you?

Here is a Livestrong.com article that may give you some ideas. Brain Plasticity Exercises — https://www.livestrong.com/article/216213-brain-plasticity-exercises/

I also found an interesting TED Talk on YouTube – You can grow new brain cells. Here's how | Sandrine Thuret

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Hi John. Thank you for this post. I’m going to study more about neurogenesis. I read science journals every week and I have a particular interest in the study of particle physics. It taxes my brain and makes me think about something that I cannot see but can understand. I’m going to try to use my left hand more often and eat more food that I can chew.🌮🥯

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@user_che214927

Hi John! I suggest you recover the book yòu loaned out, or buy a new copy , and and study very carefully.It is not a book to read, buft tò study and act upon.

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Good point!

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@darlingtondoll

Hi John. Thank you for this post. I’m going to study more about neurogenesis. I read science journals every week and I have a particular interest in the study of particle physics. It taxes my brain and makes me think about something that I cannot see but can understand. I’m going to try to use my left hand more often and eat more food that I can chew.🌮🥯

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I’m following Sandrine Thuret’s advice and had a grilled cheese sandwich for breakfast. I was aware that I had to chew each bite. I often have red wine with my meals, but not with breakfast.😉

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@johnbishop

Hi Barry @user_che214927, That is such a great topic! I had once started reading a book "The Brain's Way of Healing" by Norman Doidge — http://www.normandoidge.com/ and found it very interesting. To be honest I got about half way through the book and gave it to a friend. From what I read it makes a ton of sense but I was in the wrong frame of mind to give it a try. It kind of reminds me of a saying that's been around a long time – "The Power of Positive Thinking". I actually think there is diet craze going on now that is using the technique.

What brain exercises have you found that worked for you?

Here is a Livestrong.com article that may give you some ideas. Brain Plasticity Exercises — https://www.livestrong.com/article/216213-brain-plasticity-exercises/

I also found an interesting TED Talk on YouTube – You can grow new brain cells. Here's how | Sandrine Thuret

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Have you considered Tai Chi? “The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi” by Peter Wayne says at p 113 that “sensory alertness in the feet decreases by … 75% by age 80. This sensory loss is associated with … peripheral neuropathy due to diabetes.” And on p 118 it says “studies show that Tai Chi positively affects people who have PN and experience little sensation in their hands and feet … [which] greatly affects balance.” It also says that a study at LSU showed that 24 weeks of Tai Chi classes by people with plantar PN due to diabetes “led to an increase in sensitivity of the soles of the feet, greater balance, and faster walking speed. Another … trial reported that a 12 week Tai Chi program in diabetic patients with PN increased nerve conduction velocities.”

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@catro

Have you considered Tai Chi? “The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi” by Peter Wayne says at p 113 that “sensory alertness in the feet decreases by … 75% by age 80. This sensory loss is associated with … peripheral neuropathy due to diabetes.” And on p 118 it says “studies show that Tai Chi positively affects people who have PN and experience little sensation in their hands and feet … [which] greatly affects balance.” It also says that a study at LSU showed that 24 weeks of Tai Chi classes by people with plantar PN due to diabetes “led to an increase in sensitivity of the soles of the feet, greater balance, and faster walking speed. Another … trial reported that a 12 week Tai Chi program in diabetic patients with PN increased nerve conduction velocities.”

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Currently my exercises and change of habits is producing a slight improvement in walkiñg añd balance. I never have haď any pain.I will consider your idea a bit further down the tŕack. Thank you!

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My wife and I are going to our first Tai Chi class tomorrow. I will report later how it goes and if it helps. I have been walking on a device called a Sanddune Stepper that helps me with balance.

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I have been reading about hypnosis for control and relief from chronic pain. Has anyone tried hypnosis for painful PN and if so what was your result?

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@catro

I have been reading about hypnosis for control and relief from chronic pain. Has anyone tried hypnosis for painful PN and if so what was your result?

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@catro, that is an interesting thought but I don’t know what the thought process would involve. I am reading the Norman Doidge book on neuroplasticity which tells of factual stories of people who have totally overcome chronic and debilitating pain; it somewhat relates to the “tapping” theory which is one way of diverting pain signals to the brain. All in all, a very interesting read worth investing in. Helen

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Inow continuing with my habit changes, but as I cannot now sþend time in my gym , I have purchased this yellow trike bik, as pictured , manuel with 6 gears, and will start with short , arounnd the block rides, and hopefully increase distance. Norman Doidge has released a follow up book ' The Brain's way of healing', and it is absolutely brilliant, as it describes many cases. But a warning: you realĺy need to read his first book ' The Brain that changes itself', befòre reading this new book. I have had 2 surprise results in last 2 week. Previously if I had the urge to vist the toilet, it ment I had to visit asap, urgently. Now the extreme urgency has vanished. I still get the urge, but , and I know you won't believe this, but I do not not rush, and actually shout out to my bladder to relax, and it does. Being an old aussie, where most of us have skin problems, due to a lifetime of overexposure to our dangerous
sun, I have suffered from constant itching, especially during the night. In Doidge's first book, chapter 7 on pain management , by controlling my thinking patterns. So now , when I have the need to scratch, which has become a habit, I totally ignore the message, and change brain to me thinking of some previous happy memory. The first day was extremely hard, BUT, the urge too scratch has totally disappeared. SO, I am very excited, but not getting carried away. Best wishes from Australia.

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@user_che214927

Inow continuing with my habit changes, but as I cannot now sþend time in my gym , I have purchased this yellow trike bik, as pictured , manuel with 6 gears, and will start with short , arounnd the block rides, and hopefully increase distance. Norman Doidge has released a follow up book ' The Brain's way of healing', and it is absolutely brilliant, as it describes many cases. But a warning: you realĺy need to read his first book ' The Brain that changes itself', befòre reading this new book. I have had 2 surprise results in last 2 week. Previously if I had the urge to vist the toilet, it ment I had to visit asap, urgently. Now the extreme urgency has vanished. I still get the urge, but , and I know you won't believe this, but I do not not rush, and actually shout out to my bladder to relax, and it does. Being an old aussie, where most of us have skin problems, due to a lifetime of overexposure to our dangerous
sun, I have suffered from constant itching, especially during the night. In Doidge's first book, chapter 7 on pain management , by controlling my thinking patterns. So now , when I have the need to scratch, which has become a habit, I totally ignore the message, and change brain to me thinking of some previous happy memory. The first day was extremely hard, BUT, the urge too scratch has totally disappeared. SO, I am very excited, but not getting carried away. Best wishes from Australia.

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I am reading the second book, did not read the first, but it also explains his theory of developing distracting thought practices while experiencing pain. Dr. Doidge had remarkable success while testing his well-researched theories on himself so I would guess that his methods have validity and worth a try.

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They and I are a work in progress. However, I strongly believe you need book one, as Norman constantly refers for us to re read. Chapter 7 on pain in book one is an example, and not only a mmust read, but also a must STUDY. Good luçk and go for it!

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In reply to @johnbishop "Good point!" + (show)
@johnbishop

Good point!

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Hi John, When reading book two on thee subject of pain, Droidge directed me to read chapter 7, of book one. I did ,, and it was very necessary to understand how it works. I Have a problem with an extremely itching skin. It drove me mad , especially during the night. That night it was extremely bad, and about 3.am I was wide awake, when I thought of what I had read in chapter 7 that day on pain. The princle aim with pain is to ignore it, relax mentally think of something special from, say, your past. I thought I would try it on my itch. I was awake for the rest of the night, and refused to think about it or scratch it. It was very hard going, as was the following day and night.On arising on day 2 all itching had vanished, yes totaly and has not returned. I get the occasion mini itch, but ignore it. Amazing but true, and my balance has improved, though only minimal.

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