Afib ablation

Posted by elizabeth1941 @elizabeth1941, Fri, Feb 22 8:11am

Hello I am 78 years old and will be having an afib ablation in the next week or two. Can anyone tell me what to expect in the weeks and months after the ablation. Will I feel a lot of discomfort? Will I be limited to what activities I can do?.I have plans to travel to the west high altitude location less than three months after ablation. Is this safe to do?

@sal70

You will be able to do anything. Since my ablation I have had no problems with afib. It has been seven months, I’ve been able to go off the meds, and have a link implanted in my chest to monitor the a fib. Don’t be afraid, it’s a really good thing

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Did you have an av node ablation which would require a pacemaker

My husband had an ablation last week and got a call today requesting he get an ECG (preferably today), because something showed up different on their ECG than before. Since we live in the boonies the soonest he can get in is Thursday. The only thing that shows numbers that changed quite a bit is the P Axis degree went from a 78 to a 22. Does that mean anything to you?

Hi @sistertwo,

I moved your message to this ongoing discussion as I thought it would be beneficial for you to meet other members who are discussing Afib and ablation.
If you click on VIEW & REPLY in your email notification, you will see the whole discussion and can join in, meet, and participate with other members talking about their or their loved ones' experiences.

The axis of the ECG is the major direction of the overall electrical activity of the heart. Here’s some information that might help you to understand the ECG better: https://www.healio.com/cardiology/learn-the-heart/ecg-review/ecg-interpretation-tutorial/determining-axis

May I ask if your husband’s cardiologist has offered an explanation?

Liked by sistertwo

@kanaazpereira

Hi @elizabeth1941,

I wanted to follow-up and ask how you are doing; did you have the ablation?

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I haven't had the ablation. After much thought and anxiety I have decided to go to the Cleveland clinic,but that will be a few months down the road. I feel very comfortable with this decision. Their reputation is what solidified this decision

I am a 71-year old female with a history of very symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. I have had three cardiac ablations. The first ablation did nothing for me and I continued to have subsequent hospitalizations due to recurrent a-fib episodes. Four years later I had my second ablation. I had much better success with it and remained largely episode-free for almost five years. At that point I experienced several episodes of symptomatic a-fib and was referred for a third ablation. I underwent my third ablation in July of 2018 and have since experienced only a few brief episodes of supraventricular tachycardia. With the second and third ablations, the only effects I noticed were some tenderness in the groin and some fatigue. I was back to my normal activities within a few days of having the ablations. All three of my ablations have lasted more than six hours due to the extent of burns required; from what I understand, that is longer than the procedure is normally. I admit that initially the idea of having the ablation was anxiety-provoking, but the subsequent freedom from the a-fib episodes has certainly made the process worthwhile. I was started on dofetilide following the third ablation but was able to discontinue that in January and am now just on diltiazem once a day with the hope that I will in time be able to discontinue it as well. I am on Coumadin and will probably be on that the rest of my life as I also have coils and stent in an aneurysm in my brain. I do the INR testing at home, which makes coping with the Coumadin easier. Hope this is helpful to anyone facing the thought of having an ablation performed.

@sanibelsandy

I am a 71-year old female with a history of very symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. I have had three cardiac ablations. The first ablation did nothing for me and I continued to have subsequent hospitalizations due to recurrent a-fib episodes. Four years later I had my second ablation. I had much better success with it and remained largely episode-free for almost five years. At that point I experienced several episodes of symptomatic a-fib and was referred for a third ablation. I underwent my third ablation in July of 2018 and have since experienced only a few brief episodes of supraventricular tachycardia. With the second and third ablations, the only effects I noticed were some tenderness in the groin and some fatigue. I was back to my normal activities within a few days of having the ablations. All three of my ablations have lasted more than six hours due to the extent of burns required; from what I understand, that is longer than the procedure is normally. I admit that initially the idea of having the ablation was anxiety-provoking, but the subsequent freedom from the a-fib episodes has certainly made the process worthwhile. I was started on dofetilide following the third ablation but was able to discontinue that in January and am now just on diltiazem once a day with the hope that I will in time be able to discontinue it as well. I am on Coumadin and will probably be on that the rest of my life as I also have coils and stent in an aneurysm in my brain. I do the INR testing at home, which makes coping with the Coumadin easier. Hope this is helpful to anyone facing the thought of having an ablation performed.

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Did you have an av node ablation with a pacemaker installed?

@kanaazpereira

Hi @sistertwo,

I moved your message to this ongoing discussion as I thought it would be beneficial for you to meet other members who are discussing Afib and ablation.
If you click on VIEW & REPLY in your email notification, you will see the whole discussion and can join in, meet, and participate with other members talking about their or their loved ones' experiences.

The axis of the ECG is the major direction of the overall electrical activity of the heart. Here’s some information that might help you to understand the ECG better: https://www.healio.com/cardiology/learn-the-heart/ecg-review/ecg-interpretation-tutorial/determining-axis

May I ask if your husband’s cardiologist has offered an explanation?

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@kanaazpereira Thank you. He has not talked to his cardiologist since the evening of the ablation and everything about that was very well explained. The ECG ordered was not yet explained in layman's terms, but I'm sure it will be when they have seen the results of his appointment tomorrow. Thank you for the information.

Husband had an ablation almost two weeks ago and his BP has been running low the last few days. Now it is 100 over 53. I had him drink a bottle of water and then laid down to elevate his feet. Nothing changes. Do any of you experience a lower than usual blood pressure?

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