AF occurence

Posted by lcgh @lcgh, Wed, Oct 16 4:26pm

My AF always occurs at night after I am asleep. Does anyone else have this situation?

I think lying on your left side helps;…as I recall. (same as with reflux). It's worth a try.

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Do you mean that you wake up with it? I discovered that if I get up at night, I was jumping up too soon to a standing position–that may have created the switch to afib. Because now I sit up slowly, let my heart get used to that, and then slowly go to a standing position. So far this has prevented morning afib after the alarm rings.

Liked by lucky1038

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thanks for your observations — i don't know when the Afib starts — i can feel it at night when i am trying to go to sleep.

Liked by catmom777

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My cardiologist said that he medicates 1 in 10 who see him for 'skipped beats'. I was one of them. He told me that because I felt faint and had to take big breaths all the time (air hungry), I needed to be put on beta blockers. My daughter at about 22 years old had skipped beats and he said she was fine because it didn't affect her in any way…except that she could feel them. I think some people worry about palpitations and skipped beats when they don't need to. Of course, it should still be checked out to rule out anything more serious.

Liked by catmom777

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The AFib that I have experienced actually caused me to wake up from a sound sleep.

Liked by catmom777

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@lucky1038

thanks for your observations — i don't know when the Afib starts — i can feel it at night when i am trying to go to sleep.

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When afib begins for me in the evening, it means I've been working too hard. Then if I rest and go to sleep, it will be gone in the morning. But everyone is different.

Liked by catmom777

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Somebody already said this, but we are all different and AFIB can act differently for all of us. But you are not alone…..I was woken up many times in the middle of the night by my AFIB. Since my ablation in March, I have no more episodes……..KNOCK ON WOOD! I would talk to your cardiologist and let him/her know the ONLY time you feel the AFIB is during sleep. I'm guessing they will reassure you and have a reason why it happens that way for you. But this obvious anxiety it is producing is not good, so for peace of mind, ASK! Don't worry……they get paid A LOT more than you or me to answer a few questions! Best of luck!

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I didn't have afib but before transplant my issue was ventricular Tachacardia and yes it seemed to always be at night. Towards the end i was getting them so often right about midnight it would keep me awake. But like others said talk to your dr. I know mine was watching my magnesium levels and keeped them close to the high side. I know magnesium is real important for heart rhythm problems.

Liked by catmom777

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My AF comes and goes, but it reoccurred also recently, maybe due to family issues. Stress seems to set mine off, as does getting too tired. I can keep it at bay for months if I'm careful, but lately it's back, and it happens at night too. I wake up in the middle of the night almost every night, and lately I can feel my heart miss beats. It feels like it wants to race, but I'm on Diltiazem which keeps it from going crazy. The doc said it's OK if I take magnesium, so I might test a low dose to see if it helps.
I don't think I'll ever get used to this. I was diagnosed in March and it still makes me anxious and sad. Other people who have had it a long time said I will get used to it, but so far I haven't. The worst part for me is knowing it's for life and I'll be on these expensive drugs for life and that I might die if I quit taking the drugs. I hate the dependency and I hate my heart not beating right. But, eventually I hope I learn to live with it all. My family still doesn't get that I have to be careful. They expect me to be as healthy as I was, able to do anything at any time, travel and keep all hours, stay up late, put a lot of stress on me, etc. I'm venting. I can't vent to them because they don't get it. Only people with afib get it.

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@afrobin

My cardiologist said that he medicates 1 in 10 who see him for 'skipped beats'. I was one of them. He told me that because I felt faint and had to take big breaths all the time (air hungry), I needed to be put on beta blockers. My daughter at about 22 years old had skipped beats and he said she was fine because it didn't affect her in any way…except that she could feel them. I think some people worry about palpitations and skipped beats when they don't need to. Of course, it should still be checked out to rule out anything more serious.

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That's weird that your doc had that reaction to missed beats. I was told that missed beats are very serious because the blood stagnates in one ventricle and forms clots which can break loose when the heart starts beating regular again and then they can cause strokes. The ER doctor didn't mess around when I went in for my tachycardia. He put me on blood thinners and told me I'd be on them for the rest of my life. Every doctor I've seen since then has said the same thing. Missed beats are nothing to mess around with.

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"Missed" beats or "skipped" beats mean different things when seen on an EKG. They could be harmless, not really missed, but a space after an early beat. Usually doctors don't worry about these. If they mean afib, then the doctor wants to prevent clots and gives a blood thinner. That's why it's always good to see your doctor and get an accurate diagnosis. Twenty years of treatment for afib is a good investment if you're avoiding a stroke. Check to see if you are taking medications if there are cheaper generic ones. My 3 meds cost $15 per month. This is acceptable for lifetime health. (I've been treated for afib for almost 5 years. The condition can be okay with good treatment. Families may wish that we were getting younger instead of older, but dealing well with a medical issue always pays off in the long run. If you need more rest or a change in habits, go for it!

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I found that if I ate a trigger food like glass wine or coffee during the day even if. Had been hidden in another food

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Yup!

May be caused by a hernia pushing on stomach and pressing Vagus nerve.

Do not eat 4 hours before bed.

May be u need a spinal adjustment.

I had experienced palpitations and one episode of a fib.

I definitely would suggest seeing a chiropractor to make sure your cervical spine and thoracic spine are properly aligned.

Helped me tremendously.

Many people with heart issues do not realize that these areas of your spine can greatly affect your heart.

My story:
My EKG, echocardiogram and other tests were all normal. No one could understand why I was having the symptoms.

I got off of my metoprolol.

No one with any form of a fib should be taking a beta blocker.

I am gluten-free. I do not smoke, I do not drink, I do not take any kind of caffeine in any form.

I eat very healthy and only eat chicken or fish.

Lots of fruits and veggies, nuts.

On the advice of a cardiologist from York cardiology in the UK, I began taking magnesium taurate. This form of magnesium is excellent for the heart.

This plan, has worked for me.

So you may want to see a Chiropractor, consider magnesium taurate, and change your diet.

You can also view YouTube videos from York cardiology.

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Liked by sue225, kimut71

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Hi Jocrane, Years ago I suddenly developed Afib. My beats were all over the place. Every beat was off and so I was not getting O2 to my brain and felt faint and had to constantly take deep breaths. It was a nightmare! The cardiologist said that in 9 out of 10 cases he does not medicate. But in my case, because it was affecting my ability to get enough oxygen, he had to put me on beta blockers. (My daughter has occasional skipped beats and the cardiologist said she's fine.) Believe me, I ate well, was active, didn't drink or take caffeine in any form such as chocolate or tea or coffee etc.. Try as I might, I could not get the dose of beta blocker down from the maximum dose. which is what the cardiologist told me to do. Finally, after almost 2 years of feeling exhausted by such a high dose (that the cardiologist said could make my heart suddenly stop), I decided to go to the gym every day and push my heart for 35 minutes running on a treadmill. Within 1 month, I was off the beta blockers. I kept up my 6 days out of 7 exercise regimen and my heart has been stable ever since; and that was 24 years ago. I have to say though, that if I have a coffee or some chocolate or any stimulant such as ephedrine (the dentist gave it to me although I asked him not to…)…I will have skipped beats. I take it as a warning.
And that's my beta blocker story and how I cured my serious case of AFib.

Liked by kimut71

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@catmom777

That's weird that your doc had that reaction to missed beats. I was told that missed beats are very serious because the blood stagnates in one ventricle and forms clots which can break loose when the heart starts beating regular again and then they can cause strokes. The ER doctor didn't mess around when I went in for my tachycardia. He put me on blood thinners and told me I'd be on them for the rest of my life. Every doctor I've seen since then has said the same thing. Missed beats are nothing to mess around with.

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Missed beats, palpitations, fluttering sensations may or may not be serious and may or may not need to be treated. For many years I had palpitations on an infrequent basis and skipped beats. As time went on, things changed . Holter monitor picked up atrial tachycardia. Told you could treat or not treat or take magnesium. 6 months later, symptoms became frequent, annoyingly and unnervingly persistent. This time the holter monitor picked up ventricular tachycardia. Cardiologists jump to attention when that shows up. And that needs to be treated . Sometimes with a betablocker and sometimes with a calcium channel blocker. I take metoprolol.
Moral of the story, if you are experiencing any of the above always have it checked out.

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